Thursday Sep 03, 2015

Oracle Big Data Lite 4.2.1 - Includes Big Data Discovery

We just released Oracle Big Data Lite 4.2.1 VM.  This VM provides many of the key big data technologies that are part of Oracle's big data platform.  Along with all the great features of the previous version, Big Data Lite now adds Oracle Big Data Discovery 1.1:

The list of big data capabilities provided by the virtual machine continues to grow.  Here's a list of all the products that are pre-configured:

  • Oracle Enterprise Linux 6.6
  • Oracle Database 12c Release 1 Enterprise Edition ( - including Oracle Big Data SQL-enabled external tables, Oracle Multitenant, Oracle Advanced Analytics, Oracle OLAP, Oracle Partitioning, Oracle Spatial and Graph, and more.
  • Cloudera Distribution including Apache Hadoop (CDH5.4.0)
  • Cloudera Manager (5.4.0)
  • Oracle Big Data Discovery 1.1
  • Oracle Big Data Connectors 4.2
    • Oracle SQL Connector for HDFS 3.3.0
    • Oracle Loader for Hadoop 3.4.0
    • Oracle Data Integrator 12c
    • Oracle R Advanced Analytics for Hadoop 2.5.0
    • Oracle XQuery for Hadoop 4.2.0
  • Oracle NoSQL Database Enterprise Edition 12cR1 (3.3.4)
  • Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph 1.0
  • Oracle JDeveloper 12c (12.1.3)
  • Oracle SQL Developer and Data Modeler 4.1
  • Oracle Data Integrator 12cR1 (
  • Oracle GoldenGate 12c
  • Oracle R Distribution 3.1.1
  • Oracle Perfect Balance 2.4.0
  • Oracle CopyToBDA 2.0 
Take it for a spin - and check out the tutorials and demos that are available from the Big Data Lite download page.

Tuesday Jul 07, 2015

Update to BDA X5-2 provides more flexibility and capacity with no price changes

As more people pick up big data technologies, we see the workloads run on these big data system evolve and diversify. The initial workloads were all Map Reduce and fit a specific, (micro) batch workload pattern. Over the past couple of years that has changed and that change is reflected in the Hadoop tools - specifically with YARN. While there is still quite a bit of batch work being done, typically using Map Reduce (think Hive, Pig etc) we are seeing our customers move to more mixed workloads where the batch work is augmented with both more online SQL as well as more streaming workloads.

More Horsepower - More Capacity 

The change towards a more mixed workload leads us to change the shape of the underlying hardware. Systems now shift away from the once sacred "1-core to 1-disk ratio" and also from the small memory footprints for the worker nodes.

With the BDA X5-2 update in December 2014, BDA doubled the base memory configuration and added 2.25x more CPU resources in every node as well as upgrading to Intel's fastest Xeon E5 CPU. BDA X5-2 now has 2 * 18 Xeon cores to enable CPU intense workloads like analytics SQL queries using Oracle Big Data SQL, machine learning, graph applications etc.

With the processing covered for these more mixed workloads, we looked at other emerging trends or workloads and their impact on the BDA X5-2 hardware. The most prominent trend we see in big data are the large data volumes we expect to see from the Internet of Things (IoT) explosion and the potential cost associated with storing that data.

To address this issue (and storage cost in general) we are now adding 2x more disk space onto each and every BDA disk doubling the total available space on the system while keeping the list price constant. That is correct, 2x capacity but no price change! 

More Flexibility

And if that isn't enough, we are also changing the way our customers can grow their systems by introducing BDA Elastic Configurations.

As we see customers build out production in large increments, we also see a need to be more flexible in expanding the non-production environments (test, qa and performance environments). BDA X5-2 Elastic Configurations enables expansion of a system in 1-node increments by adding a BDA X5-2 High Capacity (HC) plus InfiniBand Infrastructure into a 6-node Starter Rack.

The increased flexibility enables our customers to start with a production scale cluster of 6 nodes (X5-2 or older) and then increment within the base rack up to 18 nodes, then expand across racks without any additional switching (no top of rack required, all on the same InfiniBand network) to build large(r) clusters. The expansion is of course all supported from the Oracle Mammoth configuration utility and its CLI, greatly simplifying expansion of clusters.

Major Improvement, No Additional Cost

Over the past generations BDA has been quickly adopted to changing usage and workload patterns enabling the adoption of Hadoop into the data ecosystem with minimal infrastructure disruption but with maximum business benefits. The latest update to BDA X5-2 enables flexibility, delivers more storage capacity and runs more workloads then ever before. 

For more information see the BDA X5-2 Data Sheet on OTN

Saturday Jun 20, 2015

Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph - Installing the Image Processing Framework

Oracle Big Data Lite 4.2 was just released - and one of the cool new features is Oracle Spatial and Graph.  In order to use this new feature, there is one more configuration step required.  Normally, we include everything you need in the VM - but this is a component that we couldn't distribute.

For the Big Data Spatial Image Processing Framework, you will need to install and configure Proj.4 - Cartographic Projections Library.  Simply follow these steps: 

  • Start the Big Data Lite VM and log in as user "oracle"
  • Launch firefox and download this tarball (​ to ~/Downloads
  • Run the following commands at the linux prompt:
    • cd ~/Downloads
    • tar -xvf proj-4.9.1.tar.gz
    • cd proj-4.9.1
    • ./configure
    • make
    • sudo make install

This will create the file in directory /usr/local/lib/.  Now that the file has been created, create links to it in the appropriate directories.  At the linux prompt:

  • sudo ln -s /usr/local/lib/ /u02/oracle-spatial-graph/shareddir/spatial/demo/imageserver/native/
  • sudo ln -s /usr/local/lib/ /usr/lib/hadoop/lib/native/

That's all there is to it.  Big Data Lite is now ready for Orace Big Data Spatial and Graph!

Oracle Big Data Lite 4.2 Now Available!

Oracle Big Data Lite Virtual Machine 4.2 is now available on OTN.  For those of you that are new to the VM - it is a great way to get started with Oracle's big data platform.  It has a ton of products installed and configured - including: 

  • Oracle Enterprise Linux 6.6
  • Oracle Database 12c Release 1 Enterprise Edition ( - including Oracle Big Data SQL-enabled external tables, Oracle Multitenant, Oracle Advanced Analytics, Oracle OLAP, Oracle Partitioning, Oracle Spatial and Graph, and more.
  • Cloudera Distribution including Apache Hadoop (CDH5.4.0)
  • Cloudera Manager (5.4.0)
  • Oracle Big Data Connectors 4.2
    • Oracle SQL Connector for HDFS 3.3.0
    • Oracle Loader for Hadoop 3.4.0
    • Oracle Data Integrator 12c
    • Oracle R Advanced Analytics for Hadoop 2.5.0
    • Oracle XQuery for Hadoop 4.2.0
  • Oracle NoSQL Database Enterprise Edition 12cR1 (3.3.4)
  • Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph 1.0
  • Oracle JDeveloper 12c (12.1.3)
  • Oracle SQL Developer and Data Modeler 4.1
  • Oracle Data Integrator 12cR1 (12.1.3)
  • Oracle GoldenGate 12c
  • Oracle R Distribution 3.1.1
  • Oracle Perfect Balance 2.4.0
  • Oracle CopyToBDA 2.0

Check out our new product - Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph (and don't forget to read the blog post on a small config update you'll need to make to use it).  It's a great way to find relationships in data and query and visualize geographic data.  Speaking of analysis... Oracle R Advanced Analytics for Hadoop now leverages Spark for many of its algorithms for (way) faster processing.

 But, that's just a couple of features... download the VM and check it out for yourself :). 

Friday May 15, 2015

Big Data Spatial and Graph is now released!

Cross-posting this from the announcement of the new spatial and graph capabilities. You can get more detail on OTN.

The product objective is to provide spatial and graph capabilities that are best suited to the use cases, data sets, and workloads found in big data environments.  Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph can be deployed on Oracle Big Data Appliance, as well as other supported Hadoop and NoSQL systems on commodity hardware. 

Here are some feature highlights.   

Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph includes two main components:

  • A distributed property graph database with 35 built-in graph analytics to
    • discover graph patterns in big data, such as communities and influencers within a social graph
    • generate recommendations based on interests, profiles, and past behaviors
  • A wide range of spatial analysis functions and services to
    • evaluate data based on how near or far something is to one another, or whether something falls within a boundary or region
    • process and visualize geospatial map data and imagery

Property Graph Data Management and Analysis

The property graph feature of Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph facilitates big data discovery and dynamic schema evolution with real-world modeling and proven in-memory parallel analytics. Property graphs are commonly used to model and analyze relationships, such as communities, influencers and recommendations, and other patterns found in social networks, cyber security, utilities and telecommunications, life sciences and clinical data, and knowledge networks.  

Property graphs model the real-world as networks of linked data comprising vertices (entities), edges (relationships), and properties (attributes) for both. Property graphs are flexible and easy to evolve; metadata is stored as part of the graph and new relationships are added by simply adding a edge. Graphs support sparse data; properties can be added to a vertex or edge but need not be applied to all similar vertices and edges.  Standard property graph analysis enables discovery with analytics that include ranking, centrality, recommender, community detection, and path finding.

Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph provides an industry leading property graph capability on Apache HBase and Oracle NoSQL Database with a Groovy-based console; parallel bulk load from common graph file formats; text indexing and search; querying graphs in database and in memory; ease of development with open source Java APIs and popular scripting languages; and an in-memory, parallel, multi-user, graph analytics engine with 35 standard graph analytics.

Spatial Analysis and Services Enrich and Categorize Your Big Data with Location

With the spatial capabilities, users can take data with any location information, enrich it, and use it to harmonize their data.  For example, Big Data Spatial and Graph can look at datasets like Twitter feeds that include a zip code or street address, and add or update city, state, and country information.  It can also filter or group results based on spatial relationships:  for example, filtering customer data from logfiles based on how near one customer is to another, or finding how many customers are in each sales territory.  These results can be visualized on a map with the included HTML5-based web mapping tool.  Location can be used as a universal key across disparate data commonly found in Hadoop-based analytic solutions. 

Also, users can perform large-scale operations for data cleansing, preparation, and processing of imagery, sensor data, and raw input data with the raster services.  Users can load raster data on HDFS using dozens of supported file formats, perform analysis such as mosaic and subset, write and carry out other analysis operations, visualize data, and manage workflows.  Hadoop environments are ideally suited to storing and processing these high data volumes quickly, in parallel across MapReduce nodes.  

Learn more about Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph at the OTN product website:

Read the Data Sheet

Read the Spatial Feature Overview

Tuesday Apr 14, 2015

Statement of Direction -- Big Data Management System

Click here to start reading the Full Statement of Direction. 

Introduction: Oracle Big Data Management System Today 

As today's enterprises embrace big data, their information architectures must evolve. Every enterprise has data warehouses today, but the best-practices information architecture embraces emerging technologies such as Hadoop and NoSQL. Today’s information architecture recognizes that data not only is stored in increasingly disparate data platforms, but also in increasingly disparate locations: on-premises and potentially multiple cloud platforms. The ideal of a single monolithic ‘enterprise data warehouse’ has faded as a new more flexible architecture has emerged. Oracle calls this new architecture the Oracle Big Data Management System, and today it consists of three key components

  • The data warehouse, running on Oracle Database and Oracle Exadata Database Machine, is the primary analytic database for storing much of a company’s core transactional data: financial records, customer data, point- of-sale data and so forth. Despite now being part of a broader architecture, the requirements on the RDBMS for performance, scalability, concurrency and workload management are in more demand than ever; Oracle Database 12c introduced Oracle Database In-Memory (with columnar tables, SIMD processing, and advanced compression schemes) as latest in a long succession of warehouse-focused innovations. The market-leading Oracle Database is the ideal starting point for customers to extend their architecture to the Big Data Management System.
  • The ‘data reservoir’, hosted on Oracle Big Data Appliance, will augment the data warehouse as a repository for the new sources of large volumes of data: machine-generated log files, social-media data, and videos and images -- as well as a repository for more granular transactional data or older transactional data which is not stored in the data warehouse. Oracle’s Big Data Management System embraces complementary technologies and platforms, including open-source technologies: Oracle Big Data Appliance includes Cloudera’s Distribution of Hadoop and Oracle NoSQL Database for data management.
  • A ‘franchised query engine,’ Oracle Big Data SQL, enables scalable, integrated access in situ to the entire Big Data Management System. SQL is the accepted language for day-to-day data access and analytic queries, and thus SQL is the primary language of the Big Data Management System.  Big Data SQL enables users to combine data from Oracle Database, Hadoop and NoSQL sources within a single SQL statement.  Leveraging the architecture of Exadata Storage Software and the SQL engine of the Oracle Database, Big Data SQL delivers high-performance access to all data in the Big Data Management System.

Using this architecture, the Oracle Big Data Management System combines the performance of Oracle’s market-leading relational database, the power of Oracle’s SQL engine, and the cost-effective, flexible storage of Hadoop and NoSQL. The result is an integrated architecture for managing Big Data, providing all of the benefits of Oracle Database, Exadata, and Hadoop, without the drawbacks of independently-accessed data repositories.  

Note that the scope of this statement of direction is the data platform for Big Data. An enterprise Big Data solution would also be comprised of big data tools and big data applications built upon this data platform. 

Read the full Statement of Direction -- Big Data Management System here.

Wednesday Apr 08, 2015

Noteworthy event for big data and data warehousing

I know there is a choice of conferences and events, but this one strikes me as very interesting. The thing that (amongst a whole bunch of other interesting sessions) strikes me as extremely interesting is the extra day with a master class on Information Architecture in the "big data world". Officially this is called Oracle Information Management and Big Data Reference architecture, and I think we - as a community - can all use some more foundation on information management. Or maybe, a nice refresher for those of us who were in the weeds of our daily jobs?

On top of the master class, there are a whole load of interesting sessions. Some are really on the consumer side, some are focused on the back-end, but I think both perspectives are very useful.

Some of the sessions that look very promising to me (in Brighton) are "A journey into big data and analytics - Liberty Global" and in either location anything on Big Data Discovery - really cool stuff, and something I think will change how we derive value from big data.

So, where do you go? Brighton and Atlanta of course...

Read more about the event here.

PS. I'm hearing our own Reiner Zimmermann is doing a keynote in Brighton! 

Wednesday Mar 18, 2015

Production workloads blend Cloud and On-Premise Capabilities

Prediction #7 - blending production workloadsacross cloud and on-premise in Oracle's Enterprise Big Data Predictions 2015 is a tough nut to crack. Yet, we at Oracle think this is really the direction we all will go. Sure we can debate the timing, and whether or not this happens in 2015, but it is something that will come to all of us who are looking towards that big data future. So let’s discuss what we think is really going to happen over the coming years in the big data and cloud world.

Reality #1 – Data will live both in the cloud and on-premise

We see this today. Organizations run Human Capital Management systems in the cloud, integrate these with data from outside cloud based systems (think for example LinkedIn, staffing agencies etc.) while their general data warehouses and new big data systems are all deployed as on-premise systems. We also see the example in the prediction where various auto dealer systems uplink into the cloud to enable the manufacturer to consolidate all of their disparate systems. This data may be translated into data warehouse entries and possibly live in two worlds – both in the cloud and on-premise for deep diving analytics or in aggregated form.

Reality #2 – Hybrid deployments are difficult to query and optimize

We also see this today and it is one of the major issues of living in the hybrid world of cloud and on-premise. A lot of the issues are driven by low level technical limitations, specifically in network bandwidth and upload / download capacity into and out of the cloud environment. The other challenges are really (big) data management challenges in that they go into the art of running queries across two ecosystems with very different characteristics. We see a trend to use engineered systems on-premise, which delivers optimized performance for the applications, but in the cloud we often see virtualization pushing the trade-off towards ease of deployment and ease of management. These completely different ecosystems make optimization of queries across them very difficult.

Solution – Equality brings optimizations to mixed environments

As larger systems like big data and data warehouse systems move to the cloud, better performance becomes a key success criterion. Oracle is uniquely positioned to drive both standardization and performance optimizations into the cloud by deploying on engineered systems like Oracle Exadata and Oracle Big Data Appliance. Deploying engineered systems enables customers to run large systems in the cloud delivering performance as they see today in on-premise deployments. This then means that we do not live in a world divided in slow and fast, but in a world of fast and fast.
This equivalence also means that we have the same functionality in both worlds, and here we can sprinkle in some – future – Oracle magic, where we start optimizing queries to take into account where the data lives, how fast we can move it around (the dreaded networking bandwidth issue) and where we need to execute code. Now, how are we going to do this? That is a piece magic, and you will just need to wait a bit… suffice it to say we are hard at work at solving this challenging topic.

Wednesday Mar 11, 2015

Oracle Big Data Lite 4.1 VM is available on OTN

Oracle Big Data Lite 4.1 VM is now available for download on OTN.  Big Data Lite includes many of the key capabilities of Oracle's big data platform.  Each of the components have been configure to work together - and there are many hands-on labs and demonstrations to help you get started using the system.  Below is a listing of what's included:

  • Oracle Enterprise Linux 6.5
  • Oracle Database 12c Release 1 Enterprise Edition ( - including Oracle Big Data SQL-enabled external tables, Oracle Multitenant, Oracle Advanced Analytics, Oracle OLAP, Oracle Partitioning, Oracle Spatial and Graph, and more.
  • Cloudera Distribution including Apache Hadoop (CDH5.3.0)
  • Cloudera Manager (5.3.0)
  • Oracle Big Data Connectors 4.1
    • Oracle SQL Connector for HDFS 3.2.0
    • Oracle Loader for Hadoop 3.3.0
    • Oracle Data Integrator 12c
    • Oracle R Advanced Analytics for Hadoop 2.4.1
    • Oracle XQuery for Hadoop 4.1.0
  • Oracle NoSQL Database Enterprise Edition 12cR1 (3.2.5)
  • Oracle JDeveloper 12c (12.1.3)
  • Oracle SQL Developer and Data Modeler 4.0.3
  • Oracle Data Integrator 12cR1 (12.1.3)
  • Oracle GoldenGate 12c
  • Oracle R Distribution 3.1.1
  • Oracle Perfect Balance 2.3.0
  • Oracle CopyToBDA 1.1 



Tuesday Mar 03, 2015

Are you leveraging Oracle's database innovations for Cloud and Big data?

If you are interested in big data, Hadoop, SQL and data warehousing then mark your calendars because on March 18th at 10:00AM PST/1:00PM EST, you will be able to hear Tom Kyte (Oracle Database Architect) talk about how you can use Oracle Big Data SQL to seamlessly integrate all your Hadoop big data datasets with your relational schemas stored in Oracle Database 12c. As part of this discussion Tom will outline how you can build the perfect foundation for your enterprise big data management system using Oracle's innovative technology.

If you are working on a data warehousing project and/or a big data project then this is one webcast you will not want to miss so register today (click here) to hear the latest about Oracle Database innovations and best practices. The full list of speakers is:

Tom Kyte
Oracle Database Architect
Keith Wilcox
VP, Database Administration
Bill Callahan
Director, Principal Engineer,
CCC Information Services, Inc.

Friday Jan 16, 2015

Deploying SAS High Performance Analytics on Big Data Appliance

Oracle and SAS have an ongoing commitment to our joint customers to deliver value-added technology integrations through engineered systems such as Exadata, Big Data Appliance, SuperCluster,  Exalogic and ZFS Storage Appliance.  Dedicated resources manage and execute on joint SAS/Oracle Database, Fusion Middleware, and Oracle Solaris integration projects; providing customer support, including sizing and IT infrastructure optimization and consolidation.  Oracle support teams are onsite at SAS Headquarters in Cary, NC (USA); and in the field on a global basis.

The latest in this effort is to enable our joint customers to deploy SAS High Performance Analytics on Big Data Appliance. This effort enables SAS users to leverage the lower cost infrastructure Hadoop offers in a production ready deployment on Oracle Big Data Appliance. Here from Paul Kent (VP Big Data, SAS) on some of the details.

Read more on deploying SAS High Performance Analytics on Don't miss the deployment guide and best practices here.

Thursday Oct 09, 2014

One of the ways Oracle is using Big Data

Today, Oracle is using big data technology and concepts to significantly improve the effectiveness of its support operations, starting with its hardware support group. While the company is just beginning this journey, the initiative is already delivering valuable benefits.

In 2013, Oracle’s hardware support group began to look at how it could use automation to improve support quality and accelerate service request (SR) resolution. Its goal is to use predictive analytics to automate SR resolution within 80% to 95% accuracy.

Oracle’s support group gathers a tremendous amount of data. Each month, for example, it logs 35,000 new SRs and receives nearly 6 TB of telemetry data via automated service requests (ASRs)—which represent approximately 18% of all SRs. Like many organizations, Oracle had a siloed view of this data, which hindered analysis. For example, it could look at SRs but could not analyze the associated text, and it could review SRs and ASRs separately, but not together.

Oracle was conducting manual root-cause analysis to identify which types of SRs were the best candidates for automation. This was a time-consuming, difficult, and costly process, and the company looked to introduce big data and predictive analytics to automate insight.

The team knew that it had to walk before it could run. It started by taking information from approximately 10 silos, such as feeds from SRs and ASRs, parts of databases, and customer experience systems, and migrating the information to an Oracle Endeca Information Discovery environment. Using the powerful Oracle Endeca solution, Oracle could look at SRs, ASRs, and associated notes in a single environment, which immediately yielded several additional opportunities for automation. On the first day of going live with the solution, Oracle identified 4% more automation opportunities.

Next, Oracle focused its efforts on gaining insight in near real time, leveraging the parallel processing of Hadoop to automatically feed Oracle Endeca Information Discovery—dramatically improving data velocity. Oracle’s first initiative with this new environment looked at Oracle Solaris SRs. In the first few weeks of that project, Oracle identified automation opportunities that will increase automated SR resolution from less than 1% to approximately 5%—simply by aggregating all of the data in near real-time. 

Once Oracle proved via these early proofs of concept that it could process data more efficiently and effectively to feed analytical projects, it began to deploy Oracle Big Data Appliance and Oracle Exalytics In-Memory Machine.

Read the entire profile here.

Monday Sep 29, 2014

The End of the Data Scientist Bubble...

Looking around northern California and inside many technology kitchens makes me believe that we are about to see the Data Scientist bubble burst. And then I read the Fortune Magazine article on Peter Thiel - and the excerpt on Zero to One (his new book) in that article and it dawned on me that is one of the intersting ways to look at the Data Scientist bubble.

Thiel's Classification of Innovation

Without trying to simplify and/or bastardize mr. Thiel's theory, the example in the Fortune Mag article will make this visible to most people (I hope). In the article the analogy is; going from one type writer to 100 type writers is 1 to N, inventing a word processor is moving us from 0 to 1. In other words, true innovation dramatically changes things by giving previously unknown power to the masses. It is that innovation that moves us from 0 to 1. Expansion of existing ideas - not true innovation - moves us from 1 to N. Of course, don't take my word on this but read the article or the book...

The Demise of the Human Data Scientist

The above paradigm explains the Data Scientist bubble quite nicely. Once upon a time companies hired a few PhD students who by chance had a degree in statistics and had learned how to program and figured out how to deal with (large) data sets. These newly minted data scientists proved that there is potential value in mashing data together, running analytics on these newly created data sets and thus caused a storm of publicity. Companies large and small are now frantically trying to hire these elusive data scientists, or something a little more down to earth, are creating data scientists (luckily not in the lab) by forming teams that bring a part of the skillset to the table.

This approach all starts to smell pretty much like a whole busload of typewriters being thrown at a well-known data analysis and data wrangling problem. Neither the problem nor the solution are new, nor innovative. Data Scientists are therefore not moving us from 0 to 1...

One could argue that while the data scientist quest is not innovative, at least is solves the problem of doing analytics. Fair and by some measure correct, but there is one bigger issue with the paradigm of "data scientists will solve our analytics problem" and that is scale. Giving the keys to all that big data to only a few data scientists is not going to work because these smart and amazing people are now becoming, often unbeknownst to them, an organizational bottleneck to gaining knowledge from big data.

The only real solution, our 0 to 1, is to expose a large number of consumers to all that big data, while enabling these consumers to apply a lot of the cool data science to all that data. In other words, we need to provide tools which include data science smarts. Those tools will enable us to apply the 80% common data science rules to the 80% of common business problems. This approach drives real business value at scale. With large chunks of issues resolved, we can then focus our few star data scientists on the 20% of problems or innovations that drive competitive advantage and change markets.

My Conclusion

The bubble is bursting because what I am seeing is more and more tools coming to market (soon) that will drive data science into the day-to-day job of all business people. Innovation is not the building of a better tool for data scientists or hiring more of them, instead the real 0 to 1 innovation is tools that make make all of us data scientists and lets us solve our own data science problems. The future of Data Science is smarter tools, not smarter humans.

Friday Sep 26, 2014

Oracle Big Data Lite 4.0 Virtual Machine Now Available

Big Data Lite 4.0 is now available for download from OTN.  There are lots of new capabilities in this latest version:
  • Oracle Database 12c (, including new JSON support and Oracle Big Data SQL-enabled external tables.  Check out this hands-on lab to learn how to securely analyze all your data - across both Hadoop and Oracle Database 12c - using Big Data SQL.
  • New versions of SQL Developer and Data Modeler that support Hive access and automatic generation of Big Data SQL external tables
  • GoldenGate and the latest ODI versions are now included - with some great new hands-on labs.
  • Cloudera Manager is back - you can now optionally use CM to manage your Hadoop environment (requires 10GB memory devoted to the VM).  If you don't want to use CM, you can use the manual CDH configuration with the Big Data Lite services application
  • New versions of the entire stack... Big Data Connectors, NoSQL Database, CDH, JDeveloper and more.

Here's the inventory of all the features and version:

  • Oracle Enterprise Linux 6.4
  • Oracle Database 12c Release 1 Enterprise Edition ( - including Oracle Big Data SQL-enabled external tables, Oracle Advanced Analytics, OLAP, Spatial and more
  • Cloudera Distribution including Apache Hadoop (CDH5.1.2)
  • Cloudera Manager (5.1.2)
  • Oracle Big Data Connectors 4.0
    • Oracle SQL Connector for HDFS 3.1.0
    • Oracle Loader for Hadoop 3.2.0
    • Oracle Data Integrator 12c
    • Oracle R Advanced Analytics for Hadoop 2.4.1
    • Oracle XQuery for Hadoop 4.0.1
  • Oracle NoSQL Database Enterprise Edition 12cR1 (3.0.14)
  • Oracle JDeveloper 12c (12.1.3)
  • Oracle SQL Developer and Data Modeler 4.0.3
  • Oracle Data Integrator 12cR1 (12.1.3)
  • Oracle GoldenGate 12c
  • Oracle R Distribution 3.1.1

Tuesday Sep 23, 2014

Big Data IM Reference Architecture

Just in time for Oracle Openworld, the new Big Data Information Management Reference Architecture is posted on our OTN pages. The reference architecture attempts to create order in the wild west of new technologies, the flurry of new ideas and most importantly tries to go from marketing hype to a real, implementable architecture.

To get all the details, read the paper here. Thanks to the EMEA architecture team , the folks at Rittman Mead Consulting and all others involved.


The data warehouse insider is written by the Oracle product management team and sheds lights on all thing data warehousing and big data.


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