Monday Sep 09, 2013

Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Database as a Service at Oracle OpenWorld 2013

Oracle OpenWorld 2013 will be big on Cloud Computing. Whether its Oracle Exadata, RAC, or Oracle Database 12c (DB12c) almost all of the solutions are designed with large scale cloud deployments in mind. At the forefront of all these technologies is Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c (EM12c) - right from provisioning, to monitoring, to managing its entire lifecycle. EM12c provides the glue that stitches different technologies together to provides a private cloud solution that enterprises can deploy to jumpstart their journey to cloud.

Like every year, there is a lot of good content being delivered about EM12c.This year it will be blend of new features (scheduled to come out in October) and lot of customer stories. Potential customers will have a great chance to talk to existing implementers and plan accordingly.

Here is a list of various sessions and demos that cover Database as a Service.

Sessions:

Zero to Cloud: Real Customers, Real-World Success Stories

This is a session by customers for customers. Come armed with your questions, and the current users of EM12c DBaaS will be happy to share their story and some practices they follow.

Harness the Power of Oracle Database 12c with Oracle Enterprise Manager Database as a Service

This is my session where I talk about EM12c DBaaS features as it stands today and how DB12c changes the dynamics with its new multitenant option. NetApp will be the co-presenter who will talk about the benefits of using EM along with NetApp Flexclone technology to speed up data cloning. Note, we will be giving away EM 12c Cloud Books and DVDs to people asking interesting questions.

Databases “On the Fly”: Unravel the Cloud Potential in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c

This is another great customer session. Norwegian Labor Agency, NAV deployed DBaaS in their data center over a year ago and since then it has becoming an integral part of their database platform team.

Oracle Exadata and Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c: Extreme Consolidation in the Cloud

HDFC Bank was an early adopter of EM 12c DBaaS, and since then they have been at the cutting edge. In this session they will talk about how they have benefited from using DBaaS over the last 2 years, and also how adopting Schema as a service has tremendously improved their consolidation efforts. Additionally, they will share details and tips on using subsetting and data masking when cloning databases.

Hands-On-Lab (HOL):

There are two excellent hands on lab sessions that will give you complete, unabated access to all EM12c DBaaS services and features. Design, setup, use, and meter your own cloud solution in 60 mins. You will also get to learn and choose between various DBaaS models (fresh database, pluggable, Snap Clone...).

Database as a Service with Oracle Enterprise Manager and Oracle Database 12c (1)

Database as a Service with Oracle Enterprise Manager and Oracle Database 12c (2)

Demo Pod:

If you are short on time, stop by our many demopods and ask for a quick demo or ask questions about our various DBaaS offerings.

Delivering and Managing Database as a Service

Zero to Cloud: Infrastructure to Testing as a Service

Deploy a Database Cloud on Oracle SuperCluster to Simplify IT and Radically Improve Service Delivery

Oracle Engineered Systems Showcase : Oracle Exadata

As always for any questions, feel free to ping me on twitter @AdeeshF.

Additional Resources:

Focus On Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c: Cloud Management

Screenwatch: Database as a Service: Using Database Cloud Self Service Portal

Short Video: Deliver Database as a Service with Oracle Enterprise Manager

Tuesday Aug 27, 2013

Delivering Cloud with DBaaS - new webcast and e-book

Recently I participated in a live webcast in which Tim Mooney from Oracle and Carl Olofson from IDC discussed customer experiences with building public and private database clouds.  The recorded webcast is now available for on-demand viewing:  Delivering Cloud through Database as a Service

The webcast focuses on how Database as a Service delivers these key cloud benefits:

  • Greater IT efficiency
  • Higher capital utilization
  • Faster time to market

 You may also be interested in the free e-book, Building a Database Cloud for Dummies.

And at this point I'll digress for a moment, as the title of the e-book reminds me of a question that arose during the webcast, and continues to cloud many of our discussions about Database as a Service: are you a consumer, or a provider? 

To see the importance of understanding the consumer/provider point of view, consider the possible answers to this question:  "How much will a typical DBaaS cost?"

If a consumer is asking the question, the answer will be "whatever the provider charges" -- and from there we can look at examples of what public cloud providers charge for DBaaS.

If a provider is asking the question, we have a much more detailed discussion which must cover the entire solution that will host the DBaaS environment, including software, hardware, people and processes.

So when asking questions about DBaaS, make sure to identify your role up front -- this helps discussions get to the point more quickly.

You might wonder, how did the e-book title lead to this digression?  It's simple: the title does not indicate whether the dummies in question are those building the cloud, or are the future consumers of the cloud, or both ... in any case, it's a nicely written book despite the ambiguous title. 



Friday Aug 23, 2013

Database Consolidation onto Private Clouds white paper - updated for Oracle Database 12c

One of our most popular white papers on private database clouds has been expanded and updated to discuss Oracle Database 12c.  Available on OTN, the new version of Database Consolidation onto Private Clouds covers best practices for consolidation with pluggable databases that the new mulitenant architecture provides, and expanded information on the database and schema consolidation options.  These are the database consolidation models the paper evaluates:  

server  database  schema
pluggable databases 


Key considerations for consolidating workloads which the paper explores:

  • Choosing a consolidation model
  • How PDBs solve the IT complexity problem
  • Isolation in consolidated environments
  • Cloud pool design
  • Complementary workloads
  • Enterprise Manager 12c for consolidation planning and operations

 The paper's OTN page is the landing pad for information on private database clouds with the Oracle Database.  Drop in to learn more about isolation and security, consolidation on Exadata Database Machine, and more.


Tuesday Aug 20, 2013

Oracle Database 12c for Private Database Clouds

The release of Oracle Database 12 is accompanied by extensive supporting collateral that details the new features and options of this major release.  But with so much to read and investigate, where to start?  If you don't have the time to pore through everything, then you may wish organize your reading in terms of the use case you're most interested in.  If your interest is Database as a Service in private database clouds then may I suggest that you start here:

Accelerate the Journey to Enterprise Cloud with Oracle Database 12c

This paper describes the phases of the journey to enterprise cloud, and enumerates the new features and options in Oracle Database 12c that support each phase.  Oracle Multitenant figures prominently, but it's not the only cloud-enabling topic: Oracle Database Quality of Service Management, Application Continuity, Automatic Data Optimization, Global Data Services and Active Data Guard Far Sync all deliver key benefits for delivering database as a service. 

Further reading and research is suggested by the references included in the paper.

Happy clouding!

Wednesday Nov 14, 2012

Slap the App on the VM for every private cloud solution! Really ?

One of the key attractions of the general session "Managing Enterprise Private Cloud" at Oracle OpenWorld 2012 was an interactive role play depicting how to address some of the key challenges of planning, deploying and managing an enterprise private cloud. It was a face-off between Don DeVM, IT manager at a fictitious enterprise 'Vulcan' and Ed Muntz, the Enterprise Manager hero .

 


Don DeVM is really excited about the efficiency and cost savings from virtualization. The success he enjoyed from the infrastructure virtualization made him believe that for all cloud service delivery models ( database, testing or applications as-a-service ), he has a single solution - slap the app on the VM and here you go .

However, Ed Muntz believes in delivering cloud services that allows the business units and enterprise users to manage the complete lifecycle of the cloud services they are providing, for example, setting up cloud, provisioning it to users through a self-service portal ,  managing and tuning the performance, monitoring and applying patches for database or applications.

Watch the video of the face-off , see how Don and Ed address s
ome of the key challenges of planning, deploying and managing an enterprise private cloud and be the judge !


Thursday Nov 08, 2012

HDFC Bank's Journey to Oracle Private Database Cloud

One of the key takeaways from a recent post by Sushil Kumar is the importance of business initiative that drives the transformational journey from legacy IT to enterprise private cloud. The journey that leads to a agile, self-service and efficient infrastructure with reduced complexity and enables IT to deliver services more closely aligned with business requirements.

Nilanjay Bhattacharjee, AVP, IT of HDFC Bank presented a real-world case study based on one such initiative in his Oracle OpenWorld session titled "HDFC BANK Journey into Oracle Database Cloud with EM 12c DBaaS". The case study highlighted in this session is from HDFC Bank’s Lending Business Segment, which comprises roughly 50% of Bank’s top line. Bank’s Lending Business is always under pressure to launch “New Schemes” to compete and stay ahead in this segment and IT has to keep up with this challenging business requirement. Lending related applications are highly dynamic and go through constant changes and every single and minor change in each related application is required to be thoroughly UAT tested certified before they are certified for production rollout. This leads to a constant pressure in IT for rapid provisioning of UAT databases on an ongoing basis to enable faster time to market.

Nilanjay joined Sushil Kumar, VP, Product Strategy, Oracle, during the Enterprise Manager general session at Oracle OpenWorld 2012. Let's watch what Nilanjay had to say about their recent Database cloud deployment.

“Agility” in launching new business schemes became the key business driver for private database cloud adoption in the Bank. Nilanjay spent an hour discussing it during his session. Let's look at why Database-as-a-Service(DBaaS) model was need of the hour in this case  -

  • Average 3 days to provision UAT Database for Loan Management Application
  • Silo’ed UAT environment with Average 30% utilization
  • Compliance requirement consume UAT testing resources
  • DBA activities leads to $$ paid to SI for provisioning databases manually
  • Overhead in managing configuration drift between production and test environments
  • Rollout impact/delay on new business initiatives

The private database cloud implementation progressed through 4 fundamental phases - Standardization, Consolidation, Automation, Optimization of UAT infrastructure. Project scoping was carried out and end users and stakeholders were engaged early on right from planning phase and including all phases of implementation.

  • Standardization and Consolidation phase involved multiple iterations of planning to first standardize on infrastructure, db versions, patch levels, configuration, IT processes etc and with database level consolidation project onto Exadata platform. It was also decided to have existing AIX UAT DB landscape covered and EM 12c DBaaS solution being platform agnostic supported this model well.
  • Automation and Optimization phase provided the necessary Agility, Self-Service and efficiency and this was made possible via EM 12c DBaaS. EM 12c DBaaS Self-Service/SSA Portal was setup with required zones, quotas, service templates, charge plan defined. There were 2 zones implemented - Exadata zone  primarily for UAT and benchmark testing for databases running on Exadata platform and second zone was for AIX setup to cover other databases those running on AIX. Metering and Chargeback/Showback capabilities provided business and IT the framework for cloud optimization and also visibility into cloud usage.

More details on UAT cloud implementation, related building blocks and EM 12c DBaaS solution are covered in Nilanjay's OpenWorld session here.

Some of the key Benefits achieved from UAT cloud initiative are -

  • New business initiatives can be easily launched due to rapid provisioning of UAT Databases [ ~3 hours ]
  • Drastically cut down $$ on SI for DBA Activities due to Self-Service
  • Effective usage of infrastructure leading to  better ROI
  • Empowering  consumers to provision database using Self-Service
  • Control on project schedule with DB end date aligned to project plan submitted during provisioning
  • Databases provisioned through Self-Service are monitored in EM and auto configured for Alerts and KPI
  • Regulatory requirement of database does not impact existing project in queue

This table below shows typical list of activities and tasks involved when a end user requests for a UAT database. EM 12c DBaaS solution helped reduce UAT database provisioning time from roughly 3 days down to 3 hours and this timing also includes provisioning time for database with production scale data (ranging from 250 G to 2 TB of data) -


And it's not just about time to provision,  this initiative has enabled an agile, efficient and transparent UAT environment where end users are empowered with real control of cloud resources and IT's role is shifted as enabler of strategic services instead of being administrator of all user requests. The strong collaboration between IT and business community right from planning to implementation to go-live has played the key role in achieving this common goal of enterprise private cloud. Finally, real cloud is here and this cloud is accompanied with rain (business benefits) as well !

For more information, please go to Oracle Enterprise Manager  web page or  follow us at : 

Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Linkedin | Newsletter

Tuesday Nov 06, 2012

FOUR questions to ask if you are implementing DATABASE-AS-A-SERVICE

During my ongoing tenure at Oracle, I have met all types of DBAs. Happy DBAs, unhappy DBAs, proud DBAs, risk-loving DBAs, cautious DBAs. These days, as Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) becomes more mainstream, I find some complacent DBAs who are basking in their achievement of having implemented DBaaS. Some others, however, are not that happy. They grudgingly complain that they did not have much of a say in the implementation, they simply had to follow what their cloud architects (mostly infrastructure admins) offered them. In most cases it would be a database wrapped inside a VM that would be labeled as “Database as a Service”. In other cases, it would be existing brute-force automation simply exposed in a portal. As much as I think that there is more to DBaaS than those approaches and often get tempted to propose Enterprise Manager 12c, I try to be objective. Neither do I want to dampen the spirit of the happy ones, nor do I want to stoke the pain of the unhappy ones. As I mentioned in my previous post, I don’t deny vanilla automation could be useful. I like virtualization too for what it has helped us accomplish in terms of resource management, but we need to scrutinize its merit on a case-by-case basis and apply it meaningfully.

For DBAs who either claim to have implemented DBaaS or are planning to do so, I simply want to provide four key questions to ponder about:

1. Does it make life easier for your end users?

Database-as-a-Service can have several types of end users. Junior DBAs, QA Engineers, Developers- each having their own skillset. The objective of DBaaS is to make their life simple, so that they can focus on their core responsibilities without having to worry about additional stuff. For example, if you are a Developer using Oracle Application Express (APEX), you want to deal with schema, objects and PL/SQL code and not with datafiles or listener configuration. If you are a QA Engineer needing database copies for functional testing, you do not want to deal with underlying operating system patching and compliance issues.

The question to ask, therefore, is, whether DBaaS makes life easier for those users. It is often convenient to give them VM shells to deal with a la Amazon EC2 IaaS, but is that what they really want? Is it a productive use of a developer's time if he needs to apply RPM errata to his Linux operating system. Asking him to keep the underlying operating system current is like making a guest responsible for a restaurant's decor.

2. Does it make life easier for your administrators?

Cloud, in general, is supposed to free administrators from attending to mundane tasks like provisioning services for every single end user request. It is supposed to enable a readily consumable platform and enforce standardization in the process. For example, if a Service Catalog exposes DBaaS of specific database versions and configurations, it, by its very nature, enforces certain discipline and standardization within the IT environment. What if, instead of specific database configurations, cloud allowed each end user to create databases of their liking resulting in hundreds of version and patch levels and thousands of individual databases.

Therefore the right question to ask is whether the unwanted consequence of DBaaS is OS and database sprawl. And if so, who is responsible for tracking them, backing them up, administering them? Studies have shown that these administrative overheads increase exponentially with new targets, and it could result in a management nightmare.

That leads us to our next question.

3. Does it satisfy your Security Officers and Compliance Auditors?

Compliance Auditors need to know who did what and when. They also want the cloud platform to be secure, so that end users have little freedom in tampering with it. Dealing with VM sprawl is not the easiest of challenges, let alone dealing with them as they keep getting reconfigured and moved around. This leads to the proverbial needle in the haystack problem, and all it needs is one needle to cause a serious compliance issue in the enterprise.

Bottomline is, flexibility and agility should not come at the expense of compliance and it is very important to get the balance right. Can we have security and isolation without creating compliance challenges? Instead of a ‘one size fits all approach’ i.e. OS level isolation, can we think smartly about database isolation or schema based isolation? This is where the appropriate resource modeling needs to be applied. The usual systems management vendors out there with heterogeneous common-denominator approach have compromised on these semantics.

If you follow Enterprise Manager’s DBaaS solution, you will see that we have considered different models, not precluding virtualization, for different customer use cases. The judgment to use virtual assemblies versus databases on physical RAC versus Schema-as-a-Service in a single database, should be governed by the need of the applications and not by putting compliance considerations in the backburner.

4. Does it satisfy your CIO?

Finally, does it satisfy your higher ups? As the sponsor of cloud initiative, the CIO is expected to lead an IT transformation project, not merely a run-of-the-mill IT operations. Simply virtualizing server resources and delivering them through self-service is a good start, but hardly transformational. CIOs may appreciate the instant benefit from server consolidation, but studies have revealed that the ROI from consolidation would flatten out at 20-25%. The question would be: what next?

As we go higher up in the stack, the need to virtualize, segregate and optimize shifts to those layers that are more palpable to the business users. As Sushil Kumar noted in his blog post, " the most important thing to note here is the enterprise private cloud is not just an IT project, rather it is a business initiative to create an IT setup that is more aligned with the needs of today's dynamic and highly competitive business environment." Business users could not care less about infrastructure consolidation or virtualization - they care about business agility and service level assurance.

Last but not the least, lot of CIOs get miffed if we ask them to throw away their existing hardware investments for implementing DBaaS. In Oracle, we always emphasize on freedom of choosing a platform; hence Enterprise Manager’s DBaaS solution is platform neutral. It can work on any Operating System (that the agent is certified on) Oracle’s hardware as well as 3rd party hardware.

As a parting note, I urge you to remember these 4 questions. Remember that your satisfaction as an implementer lies in the satisfaction of others.

Tuesday Oct 23, 2012

Clouds, Clouds, Clouds Everywhere, Not a Drop of Rain!

At the recently concluded Oracle OpenWorld 2012, the center of discussion was clearly Cloud. Over the five action packed days, I got to meet a large number of customers and most of them had serious interest in all things cloud.  Public Cloud - particularly the Oracle Cloud - clearly got a lot of attention and interest. I think the use cases and the value proposition for public cloud is pretty straight forward. However, when it comes to private cloud, there were some interesting revelations.  Well, I shouldn’t really call them revelations since they are pretty consistent with what I have heard from customers at other conferences as well as during 1:1 interactions.

While the interest in enterprise private cloud remains to be very high, only a handful of enterprises have truly embarked on a journey to create what the purists would call true private cloud - with capabilities such as self-service and chargeback/show back. For a large majority, today's reality is simply consolidation and virtualization - and they are quite far off from creating an agile, self-service and transparent IT infrastructure which is what the enterprise cloud is all about.  Even a handful of those who have actually implemented a close-to-real enterprise private cloud have taken an infrastructure centric approach and are seeing only limited business upside. Quite a few were frank enough to admit that chargeback and self-service isn’t something that they see an immediate need for. 

This is in quite contrast to the picture being painted by all those surveys out there that show a large number of enterprises having already implemented an enterprise private cloud.  On the face of it, this seems quite contrary to the observations outlined above. So what exactly is the reality?

Well, the reality is that there is undoubtedly a huge amount of interest among enterprises about transforming their legacy IT environment - which is often seen as too rigid, too fragmented, and ultimately too expensive - to something more agile, transparent and business-focused. At the same time however, there is a great deal of confusion among CIOs and architects about how to get there. This isn't very surprising given all the buzz and hype surrounding cloud computing. Every IT vendor claims to have the most unique solution and there isn't a single IT product out there that does not have a cloud angle to it. Add to this the chatter on the blogosphere, it will get even a sane mind spinning.  Consequently, most  enterprises are still struggling to fully understand the concept and value of enterprise private cloud.  Even among those who have chosen to move forward relatively early, quite a few have made their decisions more based on vendor influence/preferences rather than what their businesses actually need.  Clearly, there is a disconnect between the promise of the enterprise private cloud and the current adoption trends. 

So what is the way forward?  I certainly do not claim to have all the answers. But here is a perspective that many cloud practitioners have found useful and thus worth sharing.

To take a step back, the fundamental premise of the enterprise private cloud is IT transformation. It is the quest to create a more agile, transparent and efficient IT infrastructure that is driven more by business needs rather than constrained by operational and procedural inefficiencies. It is the new way of delivering and consuming IT services - where the IT organizations operate more like enablers of  strategic services rather than just being the gatekeepers of IT resources. In an enterprise private cloud environment, IT organizations are expected to empower the end users via self-service access/control and provide the business stakeholders a transparent view of how the resources are being used, what’s the cost of delivering a given service, how well are the customers being served, etc.  But the most important thing to note here is the enterprise private cloud is not just an IT project, rather it is a business initiative to create an IT setup that is more aligned with the needs of today's dynamic and highly competitive business environment. Surprised? You shouldn’t be. Just remember how the business users have been at the forefront of public cloud adoption within enterprises and private cloud is no exception.  

Such a broad-based transformation makes cloud more than a technology initiative. It requires people (organizational) and process changes as well, and these changes are as critical as is the choice of right tools and technology. In my next blog,  I will share how essential it is for enterprise cloud technology to go hand-in hand with process re-engineering and organization changes to unlock true value of  enterprise cloud.

I am sharing a short video from my session "Managing your private Cloud" at Oracle OpenWorld 2012. More videos from this session will be posted at the recently introduced Zero to Cloud resource page.

Many other experts of Oracle enterprise private cloud solution will join me on this blog "Zero to Cloud"  and share best practices , deployment tips and information on how to plan, build, deploy, monitor, manage , meter and optimize the enterprise private cloud. We look forward to your feedback, suggestions and having an engaging conversion with you on this blog.

About

"Zero to Cloud" Blog is dedicated to Enterprise Private Cloud Solution.
Zero To Cloud Resource Page

Search

Categories
Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today