Wednesday Jan 07, 2009

Public APIs in Sun xVM Ops Center

Sun xVM Ops Center exposes certain public APIs. These public APIs allow external systems management solutions to integrate with Sun xVM Ops Center. These public APIs are the ideal integration points for third-party software to control or to monitor the Sun xVM software. The public APIs are exposed as a series of MXBean interfaces. The main entry point to the public APIs is the MXBean interface defined in com.sun.xvm.services packages.

There are two ways of accessing public APIs:

  • Public API Access Through JMX-Remoting
  • Public API Access Through WS-Management

Some of the capabilities that are exposed by the public APIs are as follows:

  • Discovering resources on the network
  • Provisioning OS and firmware to servers
  • Managing Sun xVM Servers
  • Managing virtual pools
  • Managing and migrating guests
  • Managing networks
  • Managing virtual image libraries
  • Monitoring OS and servers

Sun xVM Ops Center comes with a software developer's kit (SDK). SDK contains the following:

  • Complete documentation of public APIs in the form of javadoc. The javadoc also contains a mapping of WS-Management queries and responses required to interact with each of these APIs.
  • Simple functional examples on how to access the public APIs. Java 6 is required to compile or use each of these examples.

For more information, see the SDK that is shipped with Sun xVM Ops Center.

Tuesday Aug 05, 2008

JET in Sun xVM Ops Center

Jumpstart Enterprise Toolkit (JET) simplifies the use of Jumpstart to install and configure Solaris OS. Solaris OS installation in Sun xVM Ops Center uses JET as the underlying technology.

Sun xVM Ops Center contains the SUNWjet package, which contains the main JET framework. This package has 3 modules: base_config, custom, and flash.

For Solaris systems, you can create a Solaris OS profile in one of two ways:

  • Create an OS profile exclusively from a JET template.

    A sample JET template is available at /opt/SUNWjet/Templates. You can either edit that template or create a new template.

    To create the OS profile, first select Operating System from the Provisioning menu, then select Import Jet Template from the OS Profiles menu. Follow the steps in the wizard to import the JET template and create a OS profile from that JET template.

  • Create an OS profile that includes additional JET module and name/value parameter functionality.

    To create the OS profile, first select Operating System from the Provisioning menu, then select Create OS Profile from the OS Profiles menu. Select Specify JET parameters in the Define Profile screen and specify additional JET parameters.

    For more information, visit http://wikis.sun.com/display/xvmOC1dot1/Creating+an+OS+Profile

    There are additional JET packages such as JetZONES and JetLDOMS available from Sun. These packages are not available in Sun xVM Ops Center as of now. You can download and use these packages to provision zones and LDoms through Sun xVM Ops Center.

  • Wednesday Jul 02, 2008

    Automating OS Provisioning

    You can perform bare metal OS provisioning using Sun xVM Ops Center. You can provision operating systems on hundreds of machines simultaneously. Using xVM Ops Center, you can avoid the manual error-prone processes that are associated with OS provisioning. xVM Ops Center supports provisioning of Solaris and Linux operating systems.

    The xVM Ops Center GUI allows you to provision your registered systems in three steps:

  • Creating OS images: An OS image is a copy of the OS installation media used to install the OS. You can create an OS image by loading an OS image from CD or DVD or by importing an OS image from ISO or FLAR files.

    To import an OS image from ISO files, first select Operating System from the Provisioning Menu, then select Import OS Image from the OS Images menu. Select one or more ISO files needed to make up the entire OS image.

  • Creating OS profiles: An OS profile specifies how to configure the OS when provisioning the OS on a set of target systems. The OS profile includes information like what software packages or distributions to install, what disk partitions to use, and various network settings. When you create an OS image, an OS profile of the same name is automatically created and is intended as a template.

    To create the OS profile, first select Operating System from the Provisioning menu, then select Create OS Profiles from the OS Profiles menu. Follow the steps in the wizard to create the OS profile.

  • Provisioning the OS: In this step, you provision the OS on one or more servers.

    To provision the OS, first select Operating System from the Provisioning menu, then select Provision OS from the Provision menu. Follow the steps in the wizard to provision the OS.

    The above OS provisioning process is similar, regardless of the hardware, operating system, or underlying technology that you are deploying. Hence, this process can be extended to automate the provisioning of data centers.

    For more information on OS provisioning, visit http://wikis.sun.com/display/xvmOC1dot1/OS+Provisioning

    For information on the systems supported for OS provisioning, visit http://wikis.sun.com/display/xvmOC1dot1/Supported+Systems+for+OS+Provisioning

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    This blog provides news and insights about Sun's xVM products, including Sun xVM Ops Center and Sun xVM Server.

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