Wednesday Mar 05, 2014

Internal Links

Another great question today, this time, from friend and colleague, Jerry the master house re-fitter. I think we are competing on who can completely rip and replace their entire house in the shortest time on their own. Every conversation we have starts with 'so what are you working on?' He's in the midst of a kitchen re-fit, Im finishing off odds and ends before I re-build our stair well and start work on my hidden man cave under said stairs. Anyhoo, his question!

Can you create a PDF document that shows a summary on the first page and provides links to more detailed sections further down in the document?

Why yes you can Jerry. Something like this? Click on the department names in the first table and the return to top links in the detail sections. Pretty neat huh? Dynamic internal links based on the data, in this case the department names.

Its not that hard to do either. Here's the template, RTF only right now.


The important fields in this case are the ones in red, heres their contents.

TopLink

<fo:block id="doctop" />

Just think of it as an anchor to the top of the page called doctop

Back to Top

<fo:basic-link internal-destination="doctop" text-decoration="underline">Back to Top</fo:basic-link>

Just a live link 'Back to Top' if you will, that takes the user to the doc top location i.e. to the top of the page.

DeptLink

<fo:block id="{DEPARTMENT_NAME}"/>

Just like the TopLink above, this just creates an anchor in the document. The neat thing here is that we dynamically name it the actual value of the DEPARTMENT_NAME. Note that this link is inside the for-each:G_DEPT loop so the {DEPARTMENT_NAME} is evaluated each time the loop iterates. The curly braces force the engine to fetch the DEPARTMENT_NAME value before creating the anchor.

DEPARTMENT_NAME

<fo:basic-link  internal-destination="{DEPARTMENT_NAME}" ><?DEPARTMENT_NAME?></fo:basic-link>

This is the link for the user to be able to navigate to the detail for that department. It does not use a regular MSWord URL, we have to create a field in the template to hold the department name value and apply the link. Note, no text decoration this time i.e. no underline.

You can add a dynamic link on to anything in the summary section. You just need to remember to keep link 'names' as unique as needed for source and destination. You can combine multiple data values into the link name using the concat function.

Template and data available here. Tested with 10 and 11g, will work with all BIP flavors.

Friday Feb 28, 2014

Waterfall Charts

Great question came through the ether from Holger on waterfall charts last night.

"I know that Answers supports waterfall charts and BI Publisher does not.
Do you have a different solution approach for waterfall charts with BI Publisher (perhaps stacked bars with white areas)?
Maybe you have already implemented something similar in the past and you can send me an example."

I didnt have one to hand, but I do now. Little known fact, the Publisher chart engine is based on the Oracle Reports chart engine. Therefore, this document came straight to mind. Its awesome for chart tips and tricks. Will you have to get your hands dirty in the chart code? Yep. Will you get the chart you want with a little effort? Yep. Now, I know, I know, in this day and age, you should get waterfalls with no effort but then you'd be bored right?

First things first, for the uninitiated, what is a waterfall chart? From some kind person at Wikipedia, "The waterfall chart is normally used for understanding how an initial value is affected by a series of intermediate positive or negative values. Usually the initial and the final values are represented by whole columns, while the intermediate values are denoted by floating columns. The columns are color-coded for distinguishing between positive and negative values."

We'll get back to that last sentence later, for now lets get the basic chart working.

Checking out the Oracle Report charting doc, search for 'floating' their term for 'waterfall' and it will get you to the section on building a 'floating column chart' or in more modern parlance, a waterfall chart. If you have already got your feet wet in the dark arts world of Publisher chart XML, get on with it and get your waterfall working.

If not, read on.

When I first starting looking at this chart, I decided to ignore the 'negative values' in the definition above. Being a glass half full kind of guy I dont see negatives right :)

Without them its a pretty simple job of rendering a stacked bar chart with 4 series for the colors. One for the starting value, one for the ending value, one for the diffs (steps) and one for the base values. The base values color could be set to white but that obscures any tick lines in the chart. Better to use the transparency option from the Oracle Reports doc.

<Series id="0" borderTransparent="true" transparent="true"/> 

Pretty simple, even the data structure is reasonably easy to get working. But, the negative values was nagging at me and Holger, who I pointed at the Oracle Reports doc had come back and could not get negative values to show correctly. So I took another look. What a pain in the butt!

In the chart above (thats my first BIP waterfall maybe the first ever BIP waterfall.) I have lime green, start and finish bars; red for negative and green for positive values. Look a little closer at the hidden bar values where we transition from red to green, ah man, royal pain in the butt! Not because of anything tough in the chart definition, thats pretty straightforward. I just need the following columns START, BASE, DOWN, UP and FINISH. 

START 200
BASE 0
UP 0
DOWN 0
FINISH 0
START 0
BASE 180
UP 0
DOWN 20
FINISH 0
START 0
BASE 150
UP 0
DOWN 30
FINISH 0

 Bar 1 - Start Value
 Bar 2 - PROD1
 Bar 3 - PROD2

and so on. The start, up, down and finish values are reasonably easy to get. The real trick is calculating that hidden BASE value correctly for that transition from -ve >> + ve and vice versa. Hitting Google, I found the key to that calculation in a great page on building a waterfall chart in Excel from the folks at Contextures.  Excel is great at referencing previous cell values to create complex calculations and I guess I could have fudged this article and used an Excel sheet as my data source. I could even have used an Excel template against my database table to create the data for the chart and fed the resulting Excel output back into the report as the data source for the chart. But, I digress, that would be tres cool thou, gotta look at that.
On that page is the formula to get the hidden base bar values and I adapted that into some sql to get the same result.

Lets assume I have the following data in a table:

PRODUCT_NAME SALES
PROD1 -20
PROD2 -30
PROD3 50
PROD4 60

The sales values are versus the same period last year i.e. a delta value.  I have a starting value of 200 total sales, lets assume this is pulled from another table.
I have spent the majority of my time on generating the data, the actual chart definition is pretty straight forward. Getting that BASE value has been most tricksy!

I need to generate the following for each column:

PRODUCT_NAME

STRT

BASE_VAL

DOWN

UP

END_TOTAL

START
200
0
0
0
0
PROD1
0
180
20
0
0
PROD2
0
150 30 0
0
PROD3
0 150 0 50 0
PROD4
0 200
0 60 0
END
0 0 0 0 260

Ignoring the START and END values for a second. Here's the query for the PRODx columns:

 SELECT 2 SORT_KEY 
, PRODUCT_NAME
, STRT
, SALES
, UP
, DOWN
, 0 END_TOTAL
, 200 + (SUM(LAG_UP - DOWN) OVER (ORDER BY PRODUCT_NAME)) AS BASE_VAL
FROM
(SELECT P.PRODUCT_NAME
,  0 AS STRT
, P.SALES
, CASE WHEN P.SALES > 0 THEN P.SALES ELSE 0 END AS UP  
, CASE WHEN P.SALES < 0 THEN ABS(P.SALES) ELSE 0 END AS DOWN
, LAG(CASE WHEN P.SALES > 0 THEN P.SALES ELSE 0 END,1,0) 
      OVER (ORDER BY P.PRODUCT_NAME) AS LAG_UP
FROM PRODUCTS P
)

The inner query is breaking the UP and DOWN values into their own columns based on the SALES value. The LAG function is the cool bit to fetch the UP value in the previous row. That column is the key to getting the BASE values correctly.

The outer query just has a calculation for the BASE_VAL.

200 + (SUM(LAG_UP - DOWN) OVER (ORDER BY PRODUCT_NAME))

The SUM..OVER allows me to iterate over the rows to get the calculation I need ie starting value (200) + the running sum of LAG_UP - DOWN. Remember the LAG_UP value is fetching the value from the previous row.
Is there a neater way to do this? Im most sure there is, I could probably eliminate the inner query with a little effort but for the purposes of this post, its quite handy to be able to break things down.

For the start and end values I used more queries and then just UNIONed the three together. Once note on that union; the sorting. For the chart to work, I need START, PRODx, FINISH, in that order. The easiest way to get that was to add a SORT_KEY value to each query and then sort by it. So my total query for the chart was:

SELECT 1 SORT_KEY
, 'START' PRODUCT_NAME
, 200 STRT
, 0 SALES
, 0 UP
, 0 DOWN
, 0 END_TOTAL
, 0 BASE_VAL
FROM PRODUCTS
UNION
SELECT 2 SORT_KEY 
, PRODUCT_NAME
, STRT
, SALES
, UP
, DOWN
, 0 END_TOTAL
, 200 + (SUM(LAG_UP - DOWN) 
      OVER (ORDER BY PRODUCT_NAME)) AS BASE_VAL
FROM
(SELECT P.PRODUCT_NAME
,  0 AS STRT
, P.SALES
, CASE WHEN P.SALES > 0 THEN P.SALES ELSE 0 END AS UP  
, CASE WHEN P.SALES < 0 THEN ABS(P.SALES) ELSE 0 END AS DOWN
, LAG(CASE WHEN P.SALES > 0 THEN P.SALES ELSE 0 END,1,0) 
       OVER (ORDER BY P.PRODUCT_NAME) AS LAG_UP
FROM PRODUCTS P
)
UNION
SELECT 3 SORT_KEY 
, 'END' PRODUCT_NAME
, 0 STRT
, 0 SALES
, 0 UP
, 0 DOWN
, SUM(SALES) + 200 END_TOTAL
, 0 BASE_VAL
FROM PRODUCTS
GROUP BY 1,2,3,4,6
ORDER BY 1 

A lot of effort for a dinky chart but now its done once, doing it again will be easier. Of course no one will want just a single chart in their report, there will be other data, tables, charts, etc. I think if I was doing this in anger I would just break out this query as a separate item in the data model ie a query just for the chart. It will make life much simpler.
Another option that I considered was to build a sub template in XSL to generate the XML tree to support the chart and assign that to a variable. Im sure it can be done with a little effort, I'll save it for another time.

On the last leg, we have the data; now to build the chart. This is actually the easy bit. Sadly I have found an issue in the online template builder that precludes using the chart builder in those templates. However, RTF templates to the rescue!

Insert a chart and in the dialog set up the data like this (click the image to see it full scale.)

Its just a vertical stacked bar with the BASE_VAL color set to white.You can still see the 'hidden' bars and they are over writing the tick lines but if you are happy with it, leave it as is. You can double click the chart and the dialog box can read it no problem. If however, you want those 'hidden' bars truly hidden then click on the Advanced tab of the chart dialog and replace:

<Series id="1" color="#FFFFFF" />

with

<Series id="1" borderTransparent="true" transparent="true" />

and the bars will become completely transparent. You can do the #D and gradient thang if you want and play with colors and themes. You'll then be done with your waterfall masterpiece!

Alot of work? Not really, more than out of the box for sure but hopefully, I have given you enough to decipher the data needs and how to do it at least with an Oracle db. If you need all my files, including table definition, sample XML, BIP DM, Report and templates, you can get them here.

Monday Feb 24, 2014

Wildcard Filtering continued

I wrote up a method for using wildcard filtering in your layouts a while back here. I spotted a followup question on that blog post last week and thought I would try and address it using another wildcard method. 

I want to use the bi publisher to look for several conditions using a wild card. For example if I was sql it would look like this:

if name in ('%Wst','%Grt')

How can I utilize bi publisher to look for the same conditions.

This, in XPATH speak is an OR condition and we can treat it as such. In the last article I used the 'starts-with' function, its a little limiting, there is a better one, 'contains'. This is a much more powerful function that allows you to look for any string within another string. Its case insensitive so you do not need to do upper or lowering of the string you are searching to get the desired results.
Here it is in action:

For the clerks filter I use :

<?for-each-group:G_1[contains(JOB_TITLE,'Clerk')];./JOB_TITLE?>

and to find all clerks and managers, I use:

<?for-each-group:G_1[contains(JOB_TITLE,'Clerk') or contains(JOB_TITLE,'Manager')];./JOB_TITLE?>

Note that Im using re-grouping here, you can use the same XPATH with a regular for-each. Also note the lower case 'or' in the second expression. You can also use an 'and' too.

This works in 10 and 11g flavors of BIP. Sample files available here.

Wednesday Oct 23, 2013

BIP 11g Dynamic SQL

Back in the 10g release, if you wanted something beyond the standard query for your report extract; you needed to break out your favorite text editor. You gotta love 'vi' and hate emacs, am I right? And get to building a data template, they were/are lovely to write, such fun ... not! Its not fun writing them by hand but, you do get to do some cool stuff around the data extract including dynamic SQL. By that I mean the ability to add content dynamically to your your query at runtime.

With 11g, we spoiled you with a visual builder, no more vi or notepad sessions, a friendly drag and drop interface allowing you to build hierarchical data sets, calculated columns, summary columns, etc. You can still create the dynamic SQL statements, its not so well documented right now, in lieu of doc updates here's the skinny.

If you check out the 10g process to create dynamic sql in the docs. You need to create a data trigger function where you assign the dynamic sql to a global variable that's matched in your report SQL. In 11g, the process is really the same, BI Publisher just provides a bit more help to define what trigger code needs to be called. You still need to create the function and place it inside a package in the db.

Here's a simple plsql package with the 'beforedata' function trigger.

Spec

create or replace PACKAGE BIREPORTS AS 

 whereCols varchar2(2000);
 FUNCTION beforeReportTrig return boolean;

end BIREPORTS;

Body

create or replace PACKAGE BODY BIREPORTS AS

  FUNCTION beforeReportTrig return boolean AS 
   BEGIN
      whereCols := ' and d.department_id = 100';
      RETURN true;
   END beforeReportTrig;

END BIREPORTS;

you'll notice the additional where clause (whereCols - declared as a public variable) is hard coded. I'll cover parameterizing that in my next post. If you can not wait, check the 10g docs for an example.

I have my package compiling successfully in the db. Now, onto the BIP data model definition.

1. Create a new data model and go ahead and create your query(s) as you would normally.

2. In the query dialog box, add in the variables you want replaced at runtime using an ampersand rather than a colon e.g. &whereCols.

 

select     d.DEPARTMENT_NAME,
...
 from    "OE"."EMPLOYEES" e,
    "OE"."DEPARTMENTS" d 
 where   d."DEPARTMENT_ID"= e."DEPARTMENT_ID" 
&whereCols

 

Note that 'whereCols' matches the global variable name in our package. When you click OK to clear the dialog, you'll be asked for a default value for the variable, just use ' and 1=1' That leading space is important to keep the SQL valid ie required whitespace. This value will be used for the where clause if case its not set by the function code.

3. Now click on the Event Triggers tree node and create a new trigger of the type Before Data. Type in the default package name, in my example, 'BIREPORTS'. Then hit the update button to get BIP to fetch the valid functions.
In my case I get to see the following:


Select the BEFOREREPORTTRIG function (or your name) and shuttle it across.

4. Save your data model and now test it. For now, you can update the where clause via the plsql package.

Next time ... parametrizing the dynamic clause.

Thursday Oct 10, 2013

Mobile App Designer

Back in August a new Oracle mobile solution jumped out of the gate, the Mobile App Designer (MAD). I seem to have been on the road every week for the last, goodness knows how many weeks. I have finally found some time this week to get down and work with it. Its pretty cool and above all, its capable of providing a mobile platform independent reporting solution.

But you already have a mobile application! Yep, and I think they both sit quite comfortably together. The Oracle BI Mobile Application is available from the App Store for Apple users. Its a great app, build reports, dashboards and BIP reports for your browser based users and your Apple app users can take advantage of them immediately.

MAD takes the next step forward. Maybe you don't use or can not use Apple mobile devices? Maybe you need to build something more specific around a business area that provides users with a richer experience, beyond what Answers and Dashboards can offer. However, you do not want to have to rely of the tech folks to build the mobile application, thats just piling more work on them. You also want to be platform agnostic, you might have a mix of mobile platforms. MAD can help.

For those of you that have already used the Online Template layout editor with BI Publisher, you already know how to build a mobile application. The MAD interface is essentially the online template builder user interface, tweaked for a mobile destination ie a phone or tablet.

You build your data model as you would normally including the newer direct data model build on a subject area from OBIEE.

Then start to create the 'pages' of your application and the content to sit on those pages. All the normal stuff, tables, pivot tables, charts, images plus accordians, filters and repeating objects. On top of that is the ability to then extend the visual objects that are available to users. Maps (google or oracle), D3 visuals, gantt charts, org charts, if you can either write the code or leverage an existing javascript library, MAD has the extension framework to support it.

You can build and test in a browser and then deploy to your own BI App Store. Users, on their mobile devices, can then subscribe to an application. They can open and interact with your app using their phone or tablet's interactive features just as they would with a native application.  As you update your app and add new features the changes will be picked up the next time your users open the application.

Interested? Want to know more? The Oracle MAD home page has a ton of content including tutorials, etc. We are planning to dig into MAD in forthcoming posts. The geek in me wanted to be able to build plugins using the D3 and other visuals. I have been working with Leslie on some of the documentation and we'll be sharing some of that 'plugin' doc and how tos in the coming weeks.

Monday Jul 15, 2013

Minning and Maxing in Pivots

A tricksy question from a hobbiteses this past week or so. How can I use minimum or maximum in an RTF template pivot table?

Using the pivot table dialog box, you get sum or count. So, how to get a min or max? You need to understand the pivot structure a bit to understand how to get the min|max. I wrote about the pivot table format a few years back here.

 Its the C field that holds the calculation as the last parameter.

<?crosstab:c8949;"//G_1";"DEPARTMENT_NAME{,o=a,t=t}";"HIRE_YEAR{,o=a,t=t}";"JOB_ID";"sum" ?>

I was not sure if we could simply swap out the sum|count function for our min, max functions. But, Im a hacker at heart, so I gave it a whirl. It worked, I used the BIP min and max functions:

xdoxslt:minimum
xdoxslt:maximum

They both work nicely!

So, the C field would look like:

<?crosstab:c8949;"//G_1";"DEPARTMENT_NAME{,o=a,t=t}";"HIRE_YEAR{,o=a,t=t}";"JOB_ID";"xdoxslt:maximum" ?>

If you do not need the default totals (that use the functions you define.) You can just delete them from the table.

Sample template and data here.

Now, the average values need cracking!


Thursday May 23, 2013

BI Publisher 11g Training - Jul 1-3

For those of you still sitting on the 10g fence ... or if you're new to Publisher 11g, take advantage of this educational opportunity:

Oracle BI Publisher 11g R1: Fundamentals

Learn To:

    Create data models by using the Data Model Editor.
    Create BI Publisher reports based on data models.
    Create report layouts by using the Layout Editor (online).
    Create reports based on OBI EE data sources.
    Publish the reports on OBI EE Dashboards.
    Schedule reports and burst these reports.

Date: 01-JUL-13
Duration: 3 days
Location: Online

Click here for more details and to enroll

Thursday Apr 11, 2013

Variable Numbers to Words

Satyender posted a comment to the Numbers to Words post asking:
How can I store the result of &lt;?xdofx:to_check_number(TOTAL_INV_AMOUNT,'USD','CASE_UPPER','DECIMAL_STYLE_WORDS')?&gt; inside a variable.

Checking this out, BIP chokes on the assigning to the variable with a nice error:

 Namespace prefix 'xdofx' used but not declared

Turning to BIP RTF template guru in residence Hok-Min, he suggested avoiding the xdofx: wrapper altogether in this case and calling the function more directly. The underlying function in java is:

public static String toCheckNumber(String locStr, String amount, String preOrCurCode, String caseStyle, String decimalStyle)

Applying that to Satyender's needs we end up with:

<?variable@incontext:salval; xdoxslt:toCheckNumber($_XDOLOCALE,.//SALARY,'USD'
,'CASE_UPPER','DECIMAL_STYLE_WORDS')?>

We still need the xdoxslt prefix but we can now assign the value to a variable. There is a caveat from Hok Min.

Note that the amount has to be in string format.  If it is not a string, it has to be converted to a string, e.g. string($CALCULATED_SALARY).  If you use XML element name directly (like in this case SALARY), then it is already a string, so no need to do conversion.

I know this raises the question of why do we need the xdofx: prefix at all? Im discussing that with Hok Min as I write and will get back to you.


Thursday Sep 27, 2012

Quick Quips on QR Codes

Yes, I'm an alliterating all-star; I missed my calling as a newspaper headline writer.
I have recently received questions from several folks on support for QR codes. You know them they are everywhere you look, even here!

How does Publisher handle QR codes then? In theory, exactly the same way we handle any other 2D barcode font. We need the font file, a mapping entry and an encoding class. With those three pieces we can embed QR codes into any output.

To test the theory, I went off to IDAutomation, I have worked with them and many customers over the years and their fonts and encoders have worked great and have been very reliable.
They kindly provide demo fonts which has made my life so much easier to be able to write posts like this. Their QR font and encoder is a little tough to find. I started here and then hit the Demo Now button. On the next page I hit the right hand Demo Now button. In the resulting zip file you'll need two files:
 AdditionalFonts.zip >> Automation2DFonts >> TrueType >> IDAutomation2D.ttf
 Java Class Encoder >> IDAutomation_JavaFontEncoder_QRCode.jar - the QRBarcodeExample.java is useful to see how to call the encoder.

The font file needs to be installed into the windows/fonts directory, just copy and paste it in using file explorer and windows will install it for you. Remember, we are using the demo font here and you'll see if you get your phones decoder to looks a the font above there is a fixed string 'DEMO' at the beginning. You want that removed? Go buy the font from the IDAutomation folks.

The Encoder

Next you need to create your encoding wrapper class. Publisher does ship a class but its compiled and I do not recommend trying to modify it, you can just build your own. I have loaded up my class here. You do not need to be a java guru, its pretty straightforward. I'd recommend a java IDE like JDeveloper from a convenience point of view. I have annotated my class and added a main method to it so you can test your encoders from JDeveloper without having to deploy them first. You can load up the project form the zip file straight into JDeveloper.

Next, take a look at IDAutomation's example java class and you'll see:

QRCodeEncoder qre=new QRCodeEncoder();
 String DataToEncode = "IDAutmation Inc.";
 boolean ApplyTilde = false;
 int EncodingMode = 0;
 int Version = 0;
 int ErrorCorrectionLevel = 0;
 System.out.println( qre.FontEncode(DataToEncode, ApplyTilde,
                        EncodingMode, Version, ErrorCorrectionLevel) );

You'll need to check what settings you need to set for the ApplyTilde, EncodingMode, Version and ErrorCorrectionLevel. They are covered in the user guide from IDAutomation here. If you do not want to hard code the values in the encoder then you can quite easily externalize them and read the values from a text file. I have not covered that scenario here, I'm going with IDAutomation's defaults and my phone app is reading the fonts no problem.

Now you know how to call the encoder, you need to incorporate it into your encoder wrapper class. From my sample class:

      Class[] clazz = new Class[] { "".getClass() };  
      ENCODERS.put("code128a",mUtility.getClass().getMethod("code128a", clazz));
      ENCODERS.put("code128b",mUtility.getClass().getMethod("code128b", clazz));
      ENCODERS.put("code128c",mUtility.getClass().getMethod("code128c", clazz));
      ENCODERS.put("qrcode",mUtility.getClass().getMethod("qrcode", clazz));

I just added a new entry to register the encoder method 'qrcode' (in red). Then I created a new method inside the class to call the IDAutomation encoder.

/** Call to IDAutomations QR Code encoder. Passing the data to encode
     Returning the encoded string to the template for formatting **/
 
public static final String qrcode (String DataToEncode)
{
  QRCodeEncoder qre=new QRCodeEncoder();
   boolean ApplyTilde = false;
   int EncodingMode = 0;
   int Version = 0;
   int ErrorCorrectionLevel = 0;
  return qre.FontEncode(DataToEncode, ApplyTilde, EncodingMode, Version, ErrorCorrectionLevel);
 }

Almost the exact same code in their sample class. The DataToEncode string is passed in rather than hardcoded of course.

With the class done you can now compile it, but you need to ensure that the IDAutomation_JavaFontEncoder_QRCode.jar is in the classpath.
In JDeveloper, open the project properties >> Libraries and Classpaths and then add the jar to the list. You'll need the publisher jars too. You can find those in the jlib directory in your Template Builder for Word directory.

Note! In my class, I have used

package oracle.psbi.barcode;

As my package spec, yours will be different but you need to note it for later.

Once you have it compiling without errors you will need to generate a jar file to keep it in.
In JDeveloper highlight your project node >> New >> Deployment Profile >> JAR file. Once you have created the descriptor, just take the defaults. It will tell you where the jar is located. Go get it and then its time to copy it and the IDAutomation jar into the Template Builder for Word directory structure.

Deploying the jars

On your windows machine locate the jlib directory under the Template Builder for Word install directory. On my machine its here, F:\Program Files\Oracle\BI Publisher\BI Publisher Desktop\Template Builder for Word\jlib. Copy both of the jar files into the directory.

The next step is to get the jars into the classpath for the Word plugin so that Publisher can find your wrapper class and it can then find the IDAutomation encoder. The most consistent way I have found so far, is to open up the RTF2PDF.jar in the same directory and make some mods.

First make a backup of the jar file then open it using winzip or 7zip or similar and get into the META-INF directory. In there is a file, MANIFEST.MF. This contains the classpath for the plugin, open it in an editor and add the jars to the end of the classpath list. In mine I have:

Manifest-Version: 1.0
Class-Path: ./activation.jar ./mail.jar ./xdochartstyles.jar ./bicmn.jar ./jewt4.jar 
./share.jar ./bipres.jar ./xdoparser.jar ./xdocore.jar ./xmlparserv2.jar 
./xmlparserv2-904.jar  ./i18nAPI_v3.jar ./versioninfo.jar 
./barcodejar.jar ./IDAutomation_JavaFontEncoder_QRCode.jar
Main-Class: RTF2PDF

I have put in carriage returns above to make the Class-Path: entry more readable, make sure yours is all on one line. Be sure to use the ./ as a prefix to the jar name. Ensure the file is saved inside the jar file 7zip and winzip both have popups asking if you want to update the file in the jar file.
Now you have the jars on the classpath, the Publisher plugin will be able to find our classes at run time.

Referencing the Font

The next step is to reference the font location so that the rendering engine can find it and embed a subset into the PDF output. Remember the other output formats rely on the font being present on the machine that is opening the document. The PDF is the only truly portable format.

Inside the config directory under the Template Builder for Word install directory, mine is here,
F:\Program Files\Oracle\BI Publisher\BI Publisher Desktop\Template Builder for Word\config.
You'll find the file, 'xdo example.cfg'. Rename it to xdo.cfg and open it in a text editor.
In the fonts section, create a new entry:

       <font family="IDAutomation2D" style="normal" weight="normal">
             <truetype path="C:\windows\fonts\IDAutomation2D.ttf" /> 
      </font>

Note, 'IDAutomation2D' (in red) is the same name as you can see when you open MSWord and look for the QRCode font. This must match exactly. When Publisher looks at the fonts in the RTF template at runtime it will see 'IDAutomation2D' it will then look at its font mapping entries to find where that font file resides on the disk. If the names do not match or the font is not present then the font will not get used and it will fall back on Helvetica.

Building the Template

Now you have the data encoder and the font in place and mapped; you can use it in the template. The two commands you will need to have present are:

<?register-barcode-vendor:'ENCODER WRAPPER CLASS'; 'ENCODER NAME'?> 

for my encoder I have:

<?register-barcode-vendor:'oracle.psbi.barcode.BarcodeUtil'; 'MyBarcodeEncoder'?>

Notice the two parameters for the command.
The first provides the package 'path' and class name (remember I said you need to remember that above.)
The second is the name of the encoder, in my case 'MyBarcodeEncoder'. Check my full encoder class in the zip linked below to see where I named it. You can change it to something else, no problem.
This command needs to be near the top of the template.

The second command is the encoding command:

<?format-barcode:DATAT_TO_ENCODE;'ENCODER_METHOD_NAME';'ENCODER_NAME'?>

for my command I have

<?format-barcode:DATATEXT;'qrcode';'MyBarcodeEncoder'?>
DATATEXT is the XML element that contains the text to be encoded. If you want to hard code a piece of text just surround it with single quotes.

qrcode is the name of my encoder method that calls the IDAutomation encoder. Remember this.
MyBarcodeEncoder is the name of my encoder. Repetition? Yes but its needed again.

Both of these commands are put inside their own form fields.

Do not apply the QRCode font to the second field just yet. Lets make sure the encoder is working. Run you template with some data and you should get something like this for your encoded data:

AHEEEHAPPJOPMOFADIPFJKDCLPAHEEEHA
BNFFFNBPJGMDIDJPFOJGIGBLMPBNFFFNB
APIBOHFJCFBNKHGGBMPFJFJLJBKGOMNII
OANKPJFFLEPLDNPCLMNGNIJIHFDNLJFEH
FPLFLHFHFILKFBLOIGMDFCFLGJGOPJJME
CPIACDFJPBGDODOJCHALJOBPECKMOEDDF
MFFNFNEPKKKCHAIHCHPCFFLDAHFHAGLMK
APBBBPAPLDKNKJKKGIPDLKGMGHDDEPHLN
HHHHHHHPHPHHPHPPHPPPPHHPHHPHPHPHP

Grooovy huh? If you do not get the encoded text then go back and check that your jars are in the right spot and that you have the MANIFEST.MF file updated correctly.
Once you do get the encoded text, highlight the field and apply the IDAutomation2D font to it. Then re-run the report and you will hopefully see the QR code in your output. If not, go back and check the xdo.cfg entry and make sure its in the right place and the font location is correct.

That's it, you now have QR codes in Publisher outputs. Everything I have written above, has been tested with the 5.6.3, 10.1.3.4.2 codelines. I'll be testing the 11g code in the next day or two and will update you with any changes.

One thing I have not covered yet and will do in the next few days is how to deploy all of this to your server. Look out for a follow up post.

One note on the apparent white lines in the font (see the image above). Once printed they disappear and even viewing the code on a screen with the white lines, my phone app is still able to read and interpret the contents no problem.

I have zipped up my encoder wrapper class as a JDeveloper 11.1.1.6 project here. Just dig into the src directories to find the BarcodeUtil.java file if you just want the code. I have put comments into the file to hopefully help the novice java programmer out.

Happy QR'ing!

Friday May 18, 2012

Secrets Revealed to Advanced Charting

We get a lot of emails and questions here at Publisher Tower concerning charts and how to do X. I write about some of the solutions here if I think they could be useful to a wider audience but its tough to document everything for everyone's specific features.

The chart dialog in the template builder gets you so far but there are cases where you are going to have to get into the code to make things work the way you want them to. I have documented a bunch which I have pulled together as links below. But if you do venture into the chart code, where do you start?

I have re-documented the location of the chart DTD document recently as it disappeared from OTN and having bugged a few people about it, its still not there, c'est la vie. But those of you with the Template Builder for Word (TB) have your own copy you can refer to. Just dig into your TB install directory and look for the dvt-jclient.jar (11g) or bipres.jar (10g) files open them with a zip utility a dig down through the directories to oracle\dss\graph\.
There you will find the fabled and rare, graph.dtd ... this is the golden fleece of the BIP charting world. In it, you will find secrets beyond your imagination, treasures beyond compare ...  OK, its not that exciting but there is a lot of charting info to be gleaned. There is not much in the way of comments but you can at least look up features and then see what attributes they will need to achieve your needs.

Just remember, Word has almost unlimited undo's, just get stuck in a try stuff out you are not going to break anything!

Some blogged chart solutions via google.

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