Monday Feb 10, 2014

Alternate Tray Printing

Since we introduced support for check printing PCL escape sequences in 11.1.1.7 i.e. being able to set the micr font or change the print cartridge to the magnetic ink for that string. I have wanted to test out other PCL commands, particularly, changing print trays. Say you have letter headed paper or pre-printed or colored paper in tray 2 but only want to use it for the first page or specific or for a separator page, the rest can come out of plain ol Tray 1 with its copier paper.

I have had a couple of inquiries recently and so, I finally took some time to test out the theory. I should add here, that the dev team thought it would work but were not 100%. The feature was built for the check printing requirements alone so they could not support any other commands. I was hopeful thou!
In short, it works!



I can generate a document and print it with embedded PCL commands to change from Tray 1 (&l4H) to Tray 2 (&l1H ) - yep, makes no sense to me either. I got the codes from here, useful site with a host of other possibilities to test.

For the test, I just created a department-employee listing that broke the page when the department changed. Just inside the first grouping loop I included the PCL string to set Tray 1.

<pcl><control><esc/>&l4H </control> </pcl>

Note, this has to be in clear text, you can not use a formfield.
I then created a dummy insert page using a template and called it from just within the closing department group field (InsertPAGE field.) At the beginning of the dummy page I included the PCL string to get the paper from Tray 2:

<pcl><control><esc/>&l1H</control> </pcl>

When you run this to PDF you will see the PCL string. I played with this and hid it using a white font and it worked great, assuming you have white paper :)

When you set up the printer in the BIP admin console, you need to ensure you have picked the 'PDF to PCL Filter' for the printer.



If you dont want to have PCL enabled all the time, you can have multiple definitions for the same printer with/with out the PCL filter. Users just need to pick the appropriate printer instance. Using this filter ensures that those PCL strings will be preserved into the final PCL that gets sent to the printer.

Example files here. Official documentation on the PCL string here.

Happy Printing!





Monday Feb 03, 2014

Memory Guard

Happy New ... err .. Chinese Year! Yeah, its been a while, its also been danged busy and we're only in February, just! A question came up on one of our internal mailing lists concerning out of memory errors. Pieter, support guru extraordinaire jumped on it with reference to a support note covering the relatively new 'BI Publisher Memory Guard'. Sounds grand eh?

As many a BIP user knows, at BIP's heart lives an XSLT engine. XSLT engines are notoriously memory hungry. Oracle's wee beastie has come a long way in terms of taming its appetite for bits and bytes since we started using it. BIP allows you to take advantage of this 'scalable mode.' Its a check box on the data model which essentially says 'XSLT engine, stop stuffing your face with memory doughnuts and get on with the salad and chicken train for this job' i.e. it gets a limited memory stack within which to work and makes use of disk, if needed, think Windows' 'virtual memory'.

Now that switch is all well and good, for a known big report that you would typically mark as 'schedule only.' You do not want users sitting in front of their screen waiting for a 10,000 page document to appear, right? How about those reports that are borderline 'big' or you have a potentially big report but expect users to filter the heck out of it and they choose not to? It would be nice to be able to set some limits on reports in case a user kicks off a monster donut binge session. Enter 'BI Publisher Memory Guard'!

It essentially lets you set those limits on memory and report size so that users can not run a report that brings the server to its knees. More information on the support web site, search for 'BI Publisher Memory Guard a New Feature to Prevent out-of-memory Errors (Doc ID 1599935.1)' or you can get Leslie's white paper covering the same here.

Wednesday Sep 18, 2013

BI Publisher Trial Edition News

Whoooo hoooo! Theres finally a new version of the BI Publisher Trial Edition available for download from OTN.

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/bi-publisher/downloads/index.html

11.1.1.7.1 is the imaginative release name. Nevermind your iOS7's get some blazingly fast BIP '.7.1'!

I'll be digging into some of the new features in the coming weeks!

Friday May 10, 2013

Building on Subject Areas

The new release of BI Publisher 11.1.1.7 has a very nice new feature for those of you wanting to build reports on top of the BI Server data model. In previous releases you would need to either write the logical sql yourself or build an Answer request and copy the SQL from the Advanced tab and paste it into the BIP data modeler.

With the new release comes the ability to create reports without the need for a data model at all. You have the option when creating a new report to use a subject area directly.

 Once you have selected the subject area you are interested in you can decide on whether to continue into the wizard to help you build the layout. Or to strike out on your own and build the layout yourself.


If you go for the latter and load up the layout editor, you get to see all of the data items you would see in the Answers builder in the data tree. Its then a case of dragging and dropping the columns into the layout, just as you would normally with a sample data source.

Once you are back to the report editor, the final step is to add some parameters. 

This is a little different to a conventional BIP report. There is no data model definition per se i.e the logical SQL is not stored but rather, the columns you added to the layout and the subject area(s) you pulled them from. Yes' you can go across subject areas, but you need to know if its going to make sense or even work before you add more. You add more subject areas click on the subject area name where the data model name normally resides. You'll then get a shuttle dialog that lets you add more subject areas. You can then add columns in the layout builder.
Getting back to the parameters, on the report editor page, click the Parameters link (top right.) This will open the parameters dialog.

You can add parameters and set how they will be displayed; whether folks can select all; do they see check boxes, a drop box or text box; whether other parameters should be limited by the choice made for this box. Everything you get with a regular BIP parameter.


Finally, the report rendered with the parameters.


If you have a need to build a more highly formatted report on the BI Server data then this is definitely the way to go. This approach really does open up BIP reporting to business users. No need to write SQL, just pick the columns you want and format them in a simple to use interface.

Before you ask, you can not build report layouts in MSWord or Excel for this type of data source, not yet anyhoo :0)



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