Tuesday Sep 27, 2011

Stuck in Your SharePoint Shell?

Are you using SharePoint? Still trying to figure out how to integrate the content in SharePoint seamlessly to your enterprise applications and business processes?

Now imagine if you could easily share information with the right people in various departments and roles across the company. And what if you could also automatically deliver targeted information to potential customers—and connect them with the right partners? It's a level of enterprise collaboration and efficiency that Microsoft SharePoint can't deliver. But Oracle WebCenter provides all this and more.

Watch Episode 1, “A Ray of Hope”, of this video series to see how a solar company enables employees to make the right connections across the company to get a product redesign into production quickly using Oracle WebCenter.


Curious as to what happens next? Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to get the news about when the next episode is available!

Learn more at http://www.oracle.com/moveoff/sharepoint

Friday Sep 09, 2011

WEM Secret Sauce

Not sure hWEM Secret Sauceow it got to be Friday already; these short holiday weeks sure seem to always fly by so quickly. TGIF.


Well...I can’t really close out this week without revealing the family recipe for a successful Web Experience Management (WEM) strategy.

What’s the WEM secret sauce? What are the essential ingredients? What should your goals be when starting out on this journey? What should your expectations be with regard to effort versus return? Can you set it and forget it?

First of all, let’s reiterate what has been widely discussed across the blogosphere.


WEM is a blend of strategy, technology and organizational change
and a key component of a complete
Customer Experience Management (CXM) Strategy.


It is NOT a field of dreams. If you are of the belief that just by building a brand new, dynamic, whiz bang site (in a vacuum) the online population will stampede and be beating down your great www doors, I suggest you stay in that fantasy world and enjoy yourself. The real world is a bit different. Once you build it – you still have to get people to find you. Make sure that you’ve included the corresponding programs for enticing visitors to find and engage your organization's site in your budget, project time line and planning.

Pixie DustThat said, I also do believe that there is a certain amount of kismet, cultural ephemera and topical sensitivity at play in our online ecosystem today. Sprinkle in a little pixie dust for good measure for accurate predictions of online behavior around the world. Add some geo-socio-political predictive analysis of our volatile global economy and political unrest and you might have a perfect recipe for an unbeatable successful WEM initiative. 

Before you begin, it is important to be very clear about your goals. How can you measure success without knowing what you are seeking to measEphemeraure? Do you want to build loyalty, drive customer acquisition, increase membership, share more knowledge, sell more widgets, reduce operational costs, and/or build an online empire? Know where you want to end up before you begin and always keep your online GPS talking to you (“recalculating…”) with your goals in mind for everything you do.

Oh, one more thing. I hate to break it to you, but it is never done. WEM is a continuous improvement and optimization cycle. The creation of targeted and brand consistent, multi-channel content and the timely contextual delivery of that content is a cycle that should never end.

WEM Cycle

In today’s socially enabled, multichannel online world, individuals increasingly expect their online experiences to be targeted specifically to their interests, and to provide a point of seamless extension and expression of who they are. For Web marketers, this new imperative presents a unique set of challenges when it comes to engaging with their customers online. No longer is it acceptable to simply present flashy product Web pages, or interact with customers via newsletters and mailing lists, nor is it acceptable to publish a stripped-down mobile version of a corporate site. Instead, you have to show the ability to “know” your customer as an individual. Would they rather interact with your company and other customers via Facebook than your corporate site? Do they do most of their browsing and interaction via their iPhone? Do they want to have a personalized view of their relationship with your company, from transaction history to loyalty offers?

Essential Ingredients of a successful WEM strategy:

  • Multi-channel – web, mobile, tablet, kiosk, next big thing…

  • Customer-focused, Data-inclusive, Customer Data driven AKA Know Thy Customerknow your customers or visitors as well as possible; use appropriate customer data in back-office systems (CRM, ERP, etc...) and treat your customers as friends like Mayberry RFD; watch, learn and adapt to their needs and desires

  • Easy business-user content authoring – eliminate reliance on IT/Development, reduce bottlenecks and IT/Marketing politics and project logjams.

  • Delivery of high-scale dynamic sites – make sure you can meet the demand globally

  • Content Targeting and Segmentation – be able to direct the right content to the right person or group auto-magically; define customer segments and create intelligent and predictive rules for what content will be delivered to each customer or segment online

  • Analytics & Optimization - Continual improvement and continuous measurement and optimization – test, measure, modify – repeat; be able to measure which content/offer/component produces the best desired results; don’t expect the same content success to last forever - keep it fresh and updated

  • User generated content (UGC) and Social networks – images, videos, recipes, discussions, and reviews, etc. - be able to accept, moderate, and quickly publish UGC to build community among your users no matter where they connect

  • End-user personalization – some users like to nest and make themselves at home - give them the tools to make their place on your sites personalized to their tastes and interests.

  • Mobile Web delivery – expect the demand for mobile access to exponentially increase; provide your users with an equivalent if not better mobile experience

Mix all these things together at once across a global enterprise. Deliver segmented, targeted, and dynamically assembled content across global Web properties with rapid response times and intelligent edge caching. Optimize and speed the delivery of dynamic, rich and engaging online experiences across Web, mobile, and social channels. Add a sprinkle of pixie dust for good luck and you’ve got a winning recipe for success.


Oracle WebCenter:
The Connected Online Customer Experience

With Oracle WebCenter, Oracle is uniquely able to offer organizations a way to engage with their customers in a highly personalized, relevant, and meaningful way across online channels. As organizations look toward the future of customer experience management, Oracle can provide one platform across all touch points—online commerce, corporate sites, mobile, social, in-store, and service. Oracle WebCenter facilitates an integrated customer experience that will foster true “one-to-one” relationships.

Tuesday Sep 06, 2011

Web Experience Management and Customer Experience Management

Before we delve into other interesting details about enhancing your customers’ experiences with your online channels, I thought it would be beneficial to lay the groundwork for defining what we consider to be Web Experience Management.

At the 10K foot level, looking down, Web Experience Management (WEM) is a strategic component of Customer Experience Management (CXM) for organizations seeking to control interaction, perception and brand adoption or loyalty with their company and its products and/or services.

There has been a lot written about Customer Experience Management and the originator of the subject is well known to be Bernd Schmitt. Schmitt is the author of an early groundbreaking book, “Experiential Marketing” and subsequently wrote the first book on “Customer Experience Management” in 2003. He has a thriving consulting practice for helping companies that focus on the customer experience to join the most successful and profitable organizations in the world. Here’s a great short interview with him as one of the top 50 thinkers of 2011.

Schmitt defines Customer Experience Management as: “…the process of strategically managing a customer’s entire experience with a product or a company.” His recent ideas about “Big Think: Killing the Sacred Cow” are a fascinating look at what companies can do to break out of their static mode by challenging the status quo of their industry to succeed in ways that couldn’t have been imagined beforehand. This is a deep subject for a future post.

Meanwhile, within the world of technology analysts, Forrester Research has defined CXM solutions in their recent report (The Emergence of Customer Experience Management Solutions by Brian K. Walker, August 10, 2011) as:

“… technology solutions that allow businesses to manage and optimize the customer experience through content management, customer targeting, analytics, personalization, and optimization capabilities across customer touchpoints — online, through mobile devices, through Internet-connected interfaces, and through digitally supported customer interactions such as contact centers and in-store or branch interfaces.”

They further boil it down to: “A solution that enables the management and delivery of dynamic, targeted, consistent content, offers, products, and service interactions across digitally enabled consumer touchpoints.”

Of course, hearing these descriptions, we all know that WEM and CXM are not one button solutions. They require careful thought and planning. The idea can be overwhelming as we think about all our products and the variations of purchasing scenarios across the potential personas. We know the clichés that it is impossible to boil the ocean and the best way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time. But…which cup do you boil first? Which bite do you start with? And the answer that everyone hates…” it depends…” We'll be looking at the main components of WEM this week and welcome your questions and input.

Web Experience Management: Labor Day Luddite

Happy end of Labor Day Weekend! Like many of you, I would have appreciated a few more days to the long weekend. However I was looking forward to starting this week's topic of Web Experience Management here on the WebCenter blog; there has been so much going on in this area both here at Oracle as well as externally across the digital ecosystem.

To start out our week, I thought I'd like to add a bit to the interesting conversation that my former colleague, Tom Wentworth started last week on Forbes.com in his post entitled, “Context Will Drive The Future Of Web Content Management.” I’d like to take Tom’s direction even a step further to continue the conversation about Web experience management that I started here last week (Mayberry R.F.D. Meets the WWW (Oracle WebCenter Blog)). I advocated bringing a lot more courtesy to our online interactions with content that is not only contextual but intelligently delivered, with all the available knowledge of the visitor taken into consideration.

To begin some of my research for this, I started an informal discussion at our annual Labor Day afternoon neighborhood block party  focused on people’s pet peeves with the experience they have on websites they frequent on a regular basis. While there was at least one Luddite in the crowd who was shocked about the amount of information that is collected in his online travels, a very interesting conversation took place about the interactions, expectations and frustrations people have for the Web sites they visit. With grill’s ablaze and cold beverages aplenty, I spent some time explaining the major types of targeted content delivery (explicit and implicit targeting, segmentation, and personalization), and as usual, discovered that John and Jane Q Public really have no idea what happens when they put a search term into a search engine.

Local Pet Peeves (based on informal, unscientific neighborhood poll):

  1. All of the people questioned HATE it when they follow a search-provided link to a website that has nothing to do with their search topic. The reality of paid search determining some of the placement location in the search result hierarchy was a foreign concept. I was surprised to hear that my Luddite neighbor would actually go 3-4 pages deep before he ditched and modified his search entry.This was not typical.
  2. My neighbors don’t like it when websites share information about them, such that their searches on different sites reflect cross-site knowledge of their experience. BUT, they do like the Amazon recommendation model while they are on the site. They also reacted negatively to the email generated and sent based on recent search activity. My Luddite neighbor was amazed that websites somehow knew where he was located and that some of the banner and sidebar ads presented were localized based on his GeoIP identification combined with recent search history. He’s a bit more paranoid about the tracking of his search history now.
  3. Bad navigation & search implementations. People want quick access (1-3 clicks maximum) to the content/product/action they are looking for in the first place. My Luddite neighbor clearly stated that he had no patience and was admittedly fickle enough to jump to another site if he can’t find what he’s looking for within a minute or so at maximum.
  4. People HATE “Pop-Ups” and “Pop-Unders” and will avoid any site with pervasive X-Ups. My Luddite friend didn’t know about pop-up blockers.

    As the conversation expanded to our interactions with organizations/companies via multiple channels of online, mobile, brick and mortar, call centers and mail, the inconsistencies of interaction based on assumed knowledge became apparent. This is a challenge for all of us involved with marketing today. How do marketers connect with consumers via their preferred channels of communication when those channels are constantly in flux? This is perhaps best captured by a wonderful OP Ed piece last week By Frank Bruni in the New York Times.

    Give it a think and stay tuned as we’ll discuss some more on this topic this week.

    Friday Sep 02, 2011

    5 Ideas: Social Business

    As we wrap up the week, it's pretty interesting to think how far "social business" has come. Technologies like Facebook and Twitter have transformed the online landscape for individual and group interactions, but it’s so much more than that. A few years ago, many were skeptical if this social networking phenomenon could be replicated in the business world. Today, it’s becoming critical for businesses to adopt collaborative technologies to innovate and stay ahead of the competition. Organizations are finding out by using social technologies and integrating them with their applications and business processes, they are adding a new dimension of interaction with customers, employees and partners. Connecting the internal efforts of employees and using collaborative technologies to extend the organization’s reach to others allows organizations to transform to social businesses.

    As many of you are aware, in June, Oracle bought FatWire, a leading provider of web experience management solutions. The acquisition enables Oracle to provide a complete customer experience management solution that helps organizations drive customer retention and loyalty through improved online engagement — across web, mobile and social channels. In these five ideas, learn more about Oracle's recent acquisition and other social networking solutions that could transform your company.

    “Together, Oracle and FatWire plan to deliver the most complete web experience management solution that will enable companies to fully optimize the customer experience with innovative social tools that enable user generated content in a managed environment. The addition of FatWire products will give Oracle the ability to provide a complete suite of software that empowers web marketers to engage visitors, converting more prospects to customers, and enhancing customer loyalty.” —Hasan Rizvi, Senior Vice President at Oracle

    “Social media and networking tools, popularly known as Web 2.0 technologies, are rapidly transforming user expectations of enterprise systems. Many organizations are investing in these new tools to cultivate a modern user experience in an 'Enterprise 2.0' environment that unlocks the full potential of traditional IT systems and fosters collaboration in key business processes...A fundamental promise of Enterprise 2.0 is that ideas will be generated and shared by everyone across the organization, leading to increased innovation, agility, and competitive advantage.” —Kellsey Ruppel, senior product marketing manager at Oracle

    “The goal is not to replicate something just like Facebook or YouTube inside the enterprise. It’s to think about how an application such as Facebook engages people to participate, share, connect and drive value. How do you then make that about doing those same things but focus them on a business process or activity?” —Andy MacMillan, Vice president, product management, Oracle WebCenter

    “Oracle WebCenter provides Activity Streams—a channel that enables the capture and distribution of knowledge that was once only possible in an enterprise's infancy. Similar to Facebook's wall, Activity Streams collect and broadcast the activities of a specific individual. Activities are collected from business tools across the enterprise such as discussion forums, document repositories, and applications.” —Oracle WebCenter expert John Brunswick

    “If you really want to have some influence on buying and purchasing decisions, whether it be for technology or anything else, go in armed with a list of certainties. For example, what do you know about your customers? Because they are changing fast. Then, look at the executives you’re going to be talking to, asking for that budget to expand what you’re doing, and the personal pain they are experiencing. Maybe it’s stockholders or maybe it’s Wall Street. Don’t go in asking for technology, go in understanding that pain. Show them how your tools can be applied to help — and how your plan is based on what you know will happen, versus knowing what might happen. You can sell if you know certainty.” —Daniel Burrus, author of Flash Foresight

    Thursday Sep 01, 2011

    Mayberry R.F.D. Meets the WWW

    Is a good dose of nostalgia driving what we desire in today’s online community? With the barrage of online enhancements to leviathan websites that have become a common part of many people’s daily rituals, it has become more of a challenge to enchant the daily eyeballs and ultimately the wallets of your prospective customers, established clients, partners, members and employees.

    While it is an obvious current imperative to present a friendly engaging online experience, this experience should be not only useful and productive, but more so optimized for enduring best results for both host and visitor without appearing completely mechanical and impersonal. As social business online grows in success via widespread acceptance and adoption, I can’t help but ask: Does social business reflect a longing for the good old days?

    In thinking about how social business drives our online engagement today, I started thinking about socio-historical context. Historically, within a small town or city neighborhood (perhaps like the fictitious small town of “Mayberry R.F.D.”), businesses were successful because they knew their customers’ needs, fulfilled their expectations, and treated them with respect and kindness. In the local country store, popular products were located within easy reach. Packaging evolved to provide just the right amount. Specialty items were specifically stocked for certain “regular” customers. Diapers and ice cream were placed in convenient proximity. Through well developed, long-term relationships, shopkeepers’ knowledge increased about their customers, and shopkeepers anticipated future desires with a varied modicum of success. In best cases, shopkeepers were rewarded with increased sales and a grateful customer, and even in the worst cases, the experience increased their knowledge of their customers’ tastes and desires. This intimate understanding of customer needs provided a win-win for the business and client as well as the larger population that benefited from successful community enterprises.

    Fast forward to today’s online world where there are similar high expectations for understanding a customer’s multi-faceted, yet now digital relationship with an organization. We want and expect instantaneous presentation and delivery of the most appropriate relevant information for the given moment and stage of our relationship/lifecycle with an organization. And because the experiences with many of our day-to-day relationships are digital, we unconsciously know that the data of our preferences and relationship history are somewhere behind the walls of the interaction we are having at any given moment. It should be a social courtesy of our online relationships with organizations to interact around our identified explicit or at least implicit profiles, regardless of our social, mobile or online channel of connection.

    Today, more and more relationships are rapidly established and dissolved in our fickle online global ecosystem. While fighting for loyalty from a global audience has become an ever-changing game of guess-work for some – it doesn’t have to be. With the right tools in place and access to the appropriate data about our customers, we can measure and continually optimize for better results with segmented, contextually targeted content that makes more sense for our online visitors. With this knowledge and appropriate powerful tools in place, we can start to build longer term, loyal, productive and more profitable relationships with our clients.

    While we can’t really return to the days of Mayberry and Aunt Bea’s apple pie, we can introduce a similar social courtesy to our online experiences by treating our site visitors as friends, not strangers.

    Stay tuned for more discussion on this topic next week.

    Wednesday Aug 31, 2011

    Get Social with Oracle WebCenter

    As I sit here today and ponder what today’s WebCenter blog post should focus on, I run through the gambit of what we normally discuss.  We could talk more about one of the 4 pillars of WebCenter and maybe drill in deeper on Content, Portal, Connect or Sites.   We could discuss the cross-functionality capabilities that cut across all the pillars, such as social, mobile, and application integration to name a few.   We could share with you some of the great events and marketing programs that are in progress, between the upcoming  AIIM Virtual Social conference, the Land O’Lakes webcast or Oracle OpenWorld -- there are some excellent venues available to learn more about WebCenter.  And if you are like me and just need that immediate gratification fix, then we also have some great on-demand content available as well, the WebCenter launch webcast and the People, Process and Content virtual forumsWe also have updated our WebCenter Oracle.com web presence to a much cleaner and more user friendly format. All of this information is great, but I honestly can’t help but think, maybe, just maybe it’s time to give our readers a voice!  Maybe you want to discuss how your organizations are either using WebCenter today or thinking about using it in the future.   Maybe you want to share some anecdotes on your experiences with WebCenter or maybe, you just want to get engaged in the community and start to interact and learn more from your peers around the globe.  Either way we have some great channels for you.  You can do so here via the comment capabilities on the blog, or you can join in the conversations via our WebCenter Facebook page,  Twitter or via our group on LinkedIn.  All of these channels are just additional venues for you to interact and engage with your peers, Oracle personnel and Oracle partners.  We want to hear your stories, your successes, your challenges and your major wins.  

    Let’s start the conversations!   

    Wednesday Aug 24, 2011

    Oracle WebCenter Quarterly Customer Update

    You’ve heard about the rebrand of Oracle WebCenter and the FatWire acquisition, but what does this mean for you as an Oracle customer and partner?

    You won’t want to miss the next Oracle WebCenter Quarterly Customer Update. You'll hear from WebCenter product management as they cover the new WebCenter branding of our ECM products, the FatWire acquisition, and what’s being planned for Oracle OpenWorld.

    Thursday, September 1, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. PT.

    Got a question regarding any of the topics above? We encourage you to submit them in the
    comments of this blog post and we'll be sure to address them on the webcast!

    Register today!

    Friday Aug 19, 2011

    Oracle OpenWorld: Partner Highlights

    Interested in hearing from Oracle WebCenter partners on the help they can offer with your Oracle WebCenter implementations? Be sure to check out these sessions or stop to see them in the exhibition hall!

    IOUG Sessions

    Sunday October 2, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    Product Focus

    9:00 am – 10:00 am

    IOUG: Oracle Universal Content Management 11g Development Environment in 45 Minutes

    Jason Stortz, Operations, Redstone Content Solutions

    Moscone West

    2002

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

    IOUG: Oracle Universal Content Management Implementation Project

    John Klein, Principal, Redstone Content Solutions

    Moscone West

    2002

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

    IOUG: What Does Mobility Mean for ECM and Enterprise 2.0?

    Jen Marzolf, Business Development, Fishbowl Solutions

    Moscone West

    2002

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    2:45 pm – 3:45 pm

    IOUG: Can SharePoint and Oracle ECM Coexist? Yes!

    Jason Lamon, Senior Marketing Associate, Fishbowl Solutions

    Moscone West

    2002

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    Oracle OpenWorld Partner Sessions

    Monday October 3, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    Product Focus

    11:00 am – 12:00 pm

    A Deep Dive into Oracle WebCenter Content Integration

    Yannick Ongena, Enterprise 2.0 Architect, Contribute
    George Estebe, Solution Architect, Oracle
    Stefan Krantz, Principal Solution Architect, Oracle

    Marriott Marquis

    Golden Gate C3

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

    Oracle's Strategy & Vision for Portals, Sites, Content and Collaboration

    Kumar Vora, Senior Vice President of Development, Oracle
    Andrew MacMillan, Vice President, Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter

    12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

    Unified Management of Healthcare Data with Oracle Content Management

    John Klinke, Sr. Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Marcus Diaz, Sr. Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Melliyal Annamalai, Principal Product Manager, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Telegraph Hill

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

    Oracle's Web Experience Management: Strategy and Vision

    Roel Stalman, Vice President of Product Management, Oracle
    Loren Weinberg, Director of Product Management, Oracle
    Nicholas Buckley, Principal Sales Consultant, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Sites

    2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

    Enabling a Social Enterprise in the Age of Cloud Computing

    Howard Beader, Sr. Director, Product Marketing, Oracle
    Peggy Chen, Principal Product Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Telegraph Hill

    Oracle WebCenter

    3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

    Web Experience Management Roadmap: New Product Capabilities and New Integrations

    Joe Duane, Senior Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Mariam Tariq, WebCenter Product Management, Oracle
    Nicholas Buckley, Principal Sales Consultant, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Telegraph Hill

    Oracle WebCenter Sites

    3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

    Oracle Composites and Portal Strategy and Vision

    Peter Moskovits, Sr. Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Sachin Agarwal, Director, Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Portal

    5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

    Land O'Lakes Connect3: A High-Volume Transaction-Based Composite Application

    Mike Macrie, Senior Director, IT, Land O'Lakes
    Sambit Dutta, Senior Manager, Deloitte Consulting LLP
    Moazzam Chaudry, Product Manager, Oracle

    Moscone West

    Room 2020

    Oracle WebCenter Portal

    Tuesday October 4, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    PRoduct Focus

    10:15 am – 11:15 am

    Marvel: Building Business Around a Content Hub

    George Sokol, Business Development, Fishbowl Solutions
    Glenn Magala, CIO, Marvel Entertainment

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    11:45 am – 12:45 pm

    Balfour Beatty: People and Expertise Finder with Oracle WebCenter and Identity Management

    Alejandro Cañadas, Operations Manager, VASSIT
    Darryn Warner, Group CIO, Balfour Beatty

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter

    1:15 pm – 2:15 pm

    NetApp Saves Millions by Automating Content Migration

    Amith Nair, Network Appliance
    Stefan Andreasen, Founder/CTO, Kapow
    Brian Dirking, Principal Product Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    Thursday October 6, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    product focus

    12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Creating a Global E-Commerce Site with Oracle E-Business Suite and Oracle Fusion Middleware

    Brian Huff, Chief Software Architect, Bezzotech

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter

    1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

    Texas A&M University System Architecture: Oracle ADF, Oracle WebCenter Portal and Content

    Andrejus Baranovskis, CEO & Architect, Red Samurai Consulting
    Sreeja Sreekumaran, Technical Lead, Texas A&M University System

    Marriott Marquis

    Salon 7

    Oracle WebCenter Portal

    3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Integrating ECM into Your Enterprise: 5 Techniques to Try and 5 Traps to Avoid

    Brian Huff, Chief Software Architect, Bezzotech

    Intercontinental

    Telegraph Hill

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    Exhibits

    exhibitor

    LOCATION

    Capgemini

    Moscone South – 313

    Cognizant

    Moscone South – 1121

    CSC

    Moscone South – 1101

    Deloitte

    Moscone South – 1511

    Fishbowl Solutions

    Moscone South – 1943

    Fujitsu

    Moscone South – 1311

    Hitachi

    Moscone South – 2101

    ImageSource, Inc.

    Moscone South – 2041

    Infosys

    Moscone South – 1813

    Keste

    Moscone South – 2321

    NetApp

    Moscone South – 1501

    SYSTIME

    JD Edwards Pavilion,
    St. Francis

    Wipro

    Moscone South – 1221

    JD Edwards Pavilion,
    St. Francis

    Thursday Aug 18, 2011

    Oracle OpenWorld: Customer Session Highlights

    Are you looking to hear from other Oracle WebCenter customers about their experiences with deploying Oracle WebCenter? You won’t want to miss these sessions!

    Oracle OpenWorld WebCenter Customer Sessions

    Monday October 3, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    Product Focus

    5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

    Land O'Lakes Connect3: A High-Volume Transaction-Based Composite Application

    Mike Macrie, Senior Director, IT, Land O'Lakes
    Sambit Dutta, Senior Manager, Deloitte Consulting LLP
    Moazzam Chaudry, Product Manager, Oracle

    Moscone West

    Room 2020

    Oracle WebCenter Portal

    Tuesday October 4, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    PRoduct Focus

    10:15 am – 11:15 am

    Marvel: Building Business Around a Content Hub

    George Sokol, Business Development, Fishbowl Solutions
    Glenn Magala, CIO, Marvel Entertainment

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    11:45 am – 12:45 pm

    Balfour Beatty: People and Expertise Finder with Oracle WebCenter and Identity Management

    Alejandro Cañadas, Operations Manager, VASSIT
    Darryn Warner, Group CIO, Balfour Beatty

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter

    11:45 am – 12:45 pm

    Driving Business Value with a Content Infrastructure for Mobility: Medtronic Case Study

    Chuck Day, System Architecture, Medtronic, Inc.
    Jim Freeland, Sr. IT Mobility Program Manager, Medtronic, Inc.
    Marcus Diaz, Sr. Principal Product Manager, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    1:15 pm – 2:15 pm

    NetApp Saves Millions by Automating Content Migration

    Amith Nair, Network Appliance
    Stefan Andreasen, Founder/CTO, Kapow
    Brian Dirking, Principal Product Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

    Deploying Oracle's Content Management Solution: Lessons Learned

    Bing Wei, Chief DBA, TEES Information Systems
    Brian Dirking, Principal Product Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

    Why We've Gone Social, and Was It Worth It? An Interactive Customer Panel

    Leonarda Horvat, Chief Information Officer, Texas A&M University System - TEES
    Andrew Gilboy, VP of Web Solutions, Oracle United Kingdom
    Robert Crossman, Vice Present of WebCenter Sales, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter

    Thursday October 6, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    product focus

    10:30 am – 11:30 am

    Oracle WebCenter and Oracle Applications: A Content Management Case Study

    Ellen Khazan, Manager, Information Services, College of American Pathologists
    Jamie Rancourt, Senior Manager, Product Management, Oracle Canada
    Kevin de Smidt, Product Management Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

    Texas A&M University System Architecture: Oracle ADF, Oracle WebCenter Portal and Content

    Andrejus Baranovskis, CEO & Architect, Red Samurai Consulting
    Sreeja Sreekumaran, Technical Lead, Texas A&M University System

    Marriott Marquis

    Salon 7

    Oracle WebCenter Portal

    Tuesday Aug 16, 2011

    Oracle OpenWorld: Don’t Miss WebCenter Sessions

     If you are attending Oracle OpenWorld this year, we’ve put together a list of “don’t miss” Oracle WebCenter sessions. Throughout the week, we'll be highlighting customer and partner sessions you'll want to be sure you add to your schedule builder as well!

    Monday October 3, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    Product Focus

    12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

    Oracle's Strategy & Vision for Portals, Sites, Content and Collaboration

    Kumar Vora, Senior Vice President of Development, Oracle
    Andrew MacMillan, Vice President, Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter

    2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

    Oracle's Web Experience Management: Strategy and Vision

    Roel Stalman, Vice President of Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Sites

    2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

    Enabling a Social Enterprise in the Age of Cloud Computing

    Howard Beader, Sr. Director, Product Marketing, Oracle
    Peggy Chen, Principal Product Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Telegraph Hill

    Oracle WebCenter

    3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

    Web Experience Management Roadmap: New Product Capabilities and New Integrations

    Joe Duane, Senior Principal Product Manager, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Telegraph Hill

    Oracle WebCenter Sites

    3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

    Oracle Composites and Portal Strategy and Vision

    Peter Moskovits, Sr. Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Sachin Agarwal, Director, Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Portal

    5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

    Oracle Enterprise Content Management Strategy and Vision

    Joe Golemba, Vice President, Oracle
    Vijay Ramanathan, Director of Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Content

     

    Tuesday October 4, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    PRoduct Focus

    10:15 am – 11:15 am

    Oracle's Social and Collaboration Strategy and Vision

    Andrew Kershaw, Sr. Director Business Development, Oracle
    Ernst Eeldert, Solution Architect, Oracle Netherlands
    Robert Hipps, Vice President, WebCenter Development, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Connect

    1:15 pm – 2:15 pm

    Social Computing/Mobile Web Experience Management: Creating an Interactive, Engaging Experience
    Michael Snow, Principal Product Marketing Director, Oracle
    Stephen Schleifer, Manager, Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Sites

    4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

    Activity Streams Are Just the Start: Enabling Effective Collaboration

    Frederic Daurelle, Outbound Product Manager, Oracle France
    Josh Lannin, Senior Director of Product Management, Oracle
    Reza Rokni, Product Manager, Oracle United Kingdom

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Connect

    5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

    Deploying Oracle's Content Management Solution: Lessons Learned

    Bing Wei, Chief DBA, TEES Information Systems
    Brian Dirking, Principal Product Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

    Why We've Gone Social, and Was It Worth It? An Interactive Customer Panel

    Leonarda Horvat, Chief Information Officer, Texas A&M University System - TEES
    Andrew Gilboy, VP of Web Solutions, Oracle United Kingdom
    Robert Crossman, Vice Present of WebCenter Sales, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter

     

    Wednesday October 5, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    product focus

    4:45pm – 5:45 pm

    The User Engagement Platform for Oracle Applications

    Andy MacMillan, Vice President, Product Management, Oracle
    Howard Beader, Sr. Director, Product Marketing, Oracle

    Moscone West

    Room 2020

    Oracle WebCenter

     

    Thursday October 6, 2011

    TIME

    TITLE

    LOCATION

    product focus

    9:00 am – 10:00 am

    Oracle Fusion Applications: Oracle WebCenter User Experience Case Study

    Peter Moskovits, Sr. Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Sachin Agarwal, Director, Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Portal

    9:00 am – 10:00 am

    Enabling Communities in the Social Enterprise

    Carin Chan, Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Kellsey Ruppel, Sr. Product Marketing Manager, Oracle
    Thomas Quigley, Product Manager, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Connect

    10:30 am – 11:30 am

    Oracle WebCenter and Oracle Applications: A Content Management Case Study

    Ellen Khazan, Manager, Information Services, College of American Pathologists
    Jamie Rancourt, Senior Manager, Product Management, Oracle Canada
    Kevin de Smidt, Product Management Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom B

    Oracle WebCenter Content

    12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

    Create Engaging and Targeted Customer Experiences, and Convert Customers into Fans

    Joe Duane, Senior Principal Product Manager, Oracle
    Michael Snow, Principal Product Marketing Director, Oracle
    Sachin Agarwal, Director, Product Management, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Sutter

    Oracle WebCenter Sites

    3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Six Counterintuitive Best Practices for Social Collaboration Adoption

    John Brunswick, Principal Solution Consultant, Oracle
    Peggy Chen, Principal Product Director, Oracle

    Intercontinental

    Ballroom C

    Oracle WebCenter Connect

     

    Monday Aug 15, 2011

    Oracle WebCenter at Oracle OpenWorld 2011: Overview