Friday Jul 20, 2012

The CXO in the Next-Generation Enterprise

Michael Fauscette

Todays guest post by:
Michael Fauscette, GVP, Software Business Solutions, IDC
~~~

The CXO in the Next-Generation Enterprise

Less than six years ago, no company had a Facebook page or Tweeted about its brand on Twitter. In fact, just a little more than 12 years ago, most companies treated Websites like a billboard — a destination where people went to “learn” about the company’s products. Brands controlled their messages and presented those messages to customers and prospects.

Today, prospects and customers look for information about a brand online everywhere but the company-controlled Website. Social networks offer trust-filtered advice and information that’s perceived as much more accurate. The social Web, with its communities and user-generated content, has helped fuel a change in attitudes and expectations across a broad population.

Another key trend, consumerization of IT, has created a different path of innovation in business, where the most innovative ideas and technologies are formed in the consumer space and pulled into the enterprise, again creating different expectations and empowered action.

Business is under pressure from customers, employees, stockholders, stakeholders and partners to do things differently, as the economy shifts away from the old industrial models into an age driven by information and the Internet’s ability to create different business models, communication channels, and open systems. Nowhere in business are these pressures felt more than in the executive suites across all industries, and spreading to all geographies.

Traditional management and leadership models, just like business models, were created for a different time, and are starting to fall short in helping businesses adapt to change. As the pace of change accelerates, executives are finding that strategy isn’t something that can be static, but instead must be flexible and adaptable to real-time inputs ranging from customer feedback to changing market conditions. Old command-and-control, hierarchical organizational structures are too siloed and inhibit knowledge-sharing and a collaborative culture.

Management models, just like business models, must adapt to the next-generation enterprise that is mobile, social, collaborative, data-driven, and has an adaptable and flexible business strategy. Next-generation executives will:

    • “Coach” instead of “manage”

    • Value and reward personal responsibility and accountability

    • Foster an open and transparent culture that leads to higher ethical standards

    • Build a culture that rewards knowledge-sharing and breaks down old knowledge-hoarding tendencies; information is the life blood of a next-generation enterprise

    • Operate in an empowering environment where employees have the power to and feel the obligation to speak up and take action when things are not working correctly

    • Power and communication are networked (not hierarchical) with people-centric nodes connecting the enterprise together, people to people, people to data, people to information, and people to system

    • All stakeholders have a voice and can influence the community that is now the essence of the business

    • Managers exist to serve, not be served

Business is changing, and management and business models must change to stay competitive. The changes are mostly about culture, and culture often does not change quickly. People fall back to habits that are comfortable, and resist change that seems uncomfortable. While a lot of the changes that businesses are experiencing are coming bottom-up, it is critical that executives understand these changes and adapt to create an environment of empowerment and collaboration.


Organic Business Networks - featuring Michael Fauscette, GVP, Software Business Solutions, IDC



To hear more with featured guest speaker, Michael Fauscette, GVP, Software Business Solutions, IDC -  Watch the On-Demand webcast of the Oracle Social Business Thought Leader Webcast Series - “Organic Business Networks: Doing Business in a Hyper-Connected World”

Wednesday May 11, 2011

Three New Videos Show Oracle's Role in The Modern Enterprise

This morning we have posted three new videos. The first video is of Kumar Vora, our SVP of Oracle WebCenter and Content Management products. In this video, Kumar talks about the transformation that Information Technology is undergoing, with the consumerization of applications, the demand for mobile access, the changing methods of collaboration and the role of social media.

The second video is of Carolina Franco of The Organization of American States. The Organization of American States uses Oracle ECM Suite as a case management tool to manage human rights petitions. The OAS enables approvals and electronic signatures from remote devices like iPads.

The third video is of Brian Skapura of The American Institute of Architects. The AIA has consolidated from over 17 content management systems. Using Oracle ECM, the AIA reduced hosting fees from $4.1M to $700K in one year. They are also using Oracle Content Management as a service-based repository, wrapped in their own display engine, showing how open Oracle Content Management is for many different uses.

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Oracle WebCenter is the center of engagement for business—powering exceptional experiences for customers, partners, and employees. It connects people, process, and information with the most complete portfolio of portal, Web experience management, content, imaging and collaboration technologies.

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