Wednesday Oct 01, 2014

Oracle Software in Silicon Cloud

I'm happy to announce that the Oracle Software in Silicon Cloud is available today.

Oracle’s revolutionary Software in Silicon technology extends the design philosophy of engineered systems to the chip. Co-engineered by Oracle’s software and microprocessor engineers, Software in Silicon implements accelerators directly into the processor to deliver a rich feature-set that enables quick development of databases and applications that are more reliable and run faster. Now, with the Oracle Software in Silicon Cloud, developers can have a secure environment to test and improve their software and exploit the unique advantages of Oracle’s Software in Silicon technology.

Oracle Software in Silicon Cloud provides developers a ready-to-run virtual machine environment to install, test, and improve their code in arobust and secure cloud platform powered by the revolutionary Software in Silicon technology in Oracle’s forthcoming SPARC M7 processor running Oracle Solaris.

This hardware-enabled functionality can be used to detect and prevent data corruptions and security violations. Test workloads have demonstrated average results of 40x faster than software-only tools, with some tests showing it’s more than 80x faster. This performance advantage illustrates the capability to eventually be always-on in production and not limited to test environments.

Oracle Software in Silicon Cloud users will have access to the latest Oracle Solaris Studio release that includes tools to detect numerous types of memory corruption errors and provide detailed diagnostic information to aid developers in quickly improving code reliability.
Code examples, demonstrations, and documentation will help users more quickly exploit the unique advantage of running applications with Software in Silicon technology.

Software in Silicon features implemented in Oracle’s forthcoming SPARC M7 processor include:

Application Data Integrity is the first-ever end-to-end implementation of memory-access validation in hardware. Designed to help prevent security bugs such as HeartBleed from putting systems at risk, it enables hardware monitoring of memory requests by software processes in real-time and it stops unauthorized access to memory whether that access is due to a programming error or a malicious attempt to exploit buffer overruns. It also helps accelerate code development and helps ensure software quality, reliability and security.

Query Acceleration increases in-memory database query processing performance by operating on data streaming directly from memory via extremely high-bandwidth interfaces –-with speeds up to 160 GB/s—resulting in tremendous performance gains. Query acceleration is implemented in multiple engines in the SPARC M7 processor.

Decompression units in the Software in Silicon acceleration engines significantly increase usable memory capacity. The units on a single processor run data decompression with performance that is equivalent to 16 decompression PCI cards or 60 CPU cores. This capability allows compressed databases to be stored in-memory while being accessed and manipulated at full performance.

For more information about the chip see this.
Read the full news press here.
For recent posts about the Oracle Software in Silicon Cloud "Securing a Cloud-Based Data Center","Building a Cloud-Based Data Center".

Monday May 19, 2014

How to Set Up a Hadoop 2.2 Cluster From the Unified Archive

Tech Article: How to Set Up a Hadoop 2.2 Cluster From the Unified Archive.
Learn how to combine an Apache Hadoop 2.2 (YARN) cluster using Oracle Solaris Zones, the ZFS file system, and the new Unified Archive capabilities of Oracle Solaris 11.2 to set up a Hadoop cluster on a single system.
Also see how to configure manual or automatic failover, and how to use the Unified Archive to create a “cloud in a box” and deploy bare-metal system.



The article starts with a brief overview of Hadoop and follows with an example of setting up a Hadoop cluster with two NameNodes, a Resource Manager, a History Server, and three DataNodes. As a prerequisite, you should have a basic understanding of Oracle Solaris Zones and network administration.

Table of Contents:
About Hadoop and Oracle Solaris Zones
Download and Install Hadoop
Configure the Network Time Protocol
Configure the Active NameNode
Set Up the Standby NameNode and the ResourceManager
Set Up the DataNode Zones
Format the Hadoop File System
Start the Hadoop Cluster
About Hadoop High Availability
Configure Manual Failover
About Apache ZooKeeper and Automatic Failover
Configure Automatic Failover
Create a "Cloud in a Box" Using Unified Archive
Deploy a Bare-Metal System from a Unified Archive

Tuesday Dec 17, 2013

Performance Analysis in a Multitenant Cloud Environment Using Hadoop Cluster and Oracle Solaris 11

Oracle Solaris 11 comes with a new set of commands that provide the ability to conduct
performance analysis in a virtualized multitenant cloud environment. Performance analysis in a
virtualized multitenant cloud environment with different users running various workloads can be a
challenging task for the following reasons:

Each virtualization software adds an abstraction layer to enable better manageability. Although this makes it much simpler to manage the virtualized resources, it is very difficult to find the physical system resources that are overloaded.

Each Oracle Solaris Zone can have different workload; it can be disk I/O, network I/O, CPU, memory, or combination of these.

In addition, a single Oracle Solaris Zone can overload the entire system resources.It is very difficult to observe the environment; you need to be able to monitor the environment from the top level to see all the virtual instances (non-global zones) in real time with the ability to drill down to specific resources.


The benefits of using Oracle Solaris 11 for virtualized performance analysis are:

Observability. The Oracle Solaris global zone is a fully functioning operating systems, not a propriety hypervisor or a minimized operating system that lacks the ability to observe the entire environment—including the host and the VMs, at the same time. The global zone can see all the non-global zones’ performance metrics.

Integration. All the subsystems are built inside the same operating system. For example, the ZFS file system and the Oracle Solaris Zones virtualization technology are integrated together. This is preferable to mixing many vendors’ technology, which causes a lack of integration between the different operating system (OS) subsystems and makes it very difficult to analyze all the different OS subsystems at the same time.

Virtualization awareness. The built-in Oracle Solaris commands are virtualization-aware,and they can provide performance statistics for the entire system (the Oracle Solaris global zone). In addition to providing the ability to
drill down into every resource (Oracle Solaris non-global zones), these commands provide accurate results during the performance analysis process.

In this article, we are going to explore four examples that show how we can monitor virtualized environment with Oracle Solaris Zones using the built-in Oracle Solaris 11 tools. These tools provide the ability to drill down to specific resources, for example, CPU, memory, disk, and network. In addition, they provide the ability to print statistics per Oracle Solaris Zone and provide information on the running applications.


Read it 
Article: Performance Analysis in a Multitenant Cloud Environment

About

This blog covers cloud computing, big data and virtualization technologies

Search

Categories
Archives
« February 2015
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
       
       
Today