Monday Aug 19, 2013

Open Universities Australia uses Oracle VM to Virtualize Oracle Database and PeopleSoft

Open Universities Australia Realizes Valuable Savings and Simplifies IT with Oracle VM

Deploys Virtualized Oracle Database and Oracle’s PeopleSoft Applications to Production, Development and Disaster Recovery Environments in Campus-Wide Infrastructure Upgrade

Read the entire press release.

Open Universities Australia (OUA) director of ICT, Anthony Russo, was faced with a 3 year cycle of systems upgrade. With tightening budgets to meet growth targets, needing to deliver on cost efficiencies while staying within constraints of existing license footprints and implementing a zero outage operations model, Anthony had to re-evaluate his traditional IT approach with bare metal computing.

Virtualizing Oracle Database and Oracle PeopleSoft Campus applications were a remote option for Anthony due to fear of loss in performance and managing the complexity of the environment with a small IT staff. The environments that would be affected were the hosted development, and cloud based environments for both Production and Disaster Recovery.

However, the looming hardware refresh and software upgrade costs of over $300,000 convinced Anthony to evaluate Virtualization.

Oracle VM claims as the best virtualization technology for Oracle Database and enterprise applications workload were not sufficient data to decide on this important refresh. Anthony embarked on a performance testing validation exercise. To his surprise, his own performance results debunked the performance myths about virtualizing database workloads -- in fact in some cases virtualized workloads on Oracle VM performed better than even on bare metal!

As for the fear of complexity introduced to his IT process by virtualization, this was also debunked with Oracle VM Templates and Oracle Enterprise Manger 12c. His IT team provisioned a multi-node Oracle RAC environment all within a few hours using the Oracle VM Templates with pre-configured Oracle Database, RAC and Oracle Linux. With Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c, the team is able to manage and monitor Oracle VM servers and virtual machines across multiple locations from a single console.

Anthony shares his report findings in a whitepaper “ Oracle VM on Oracle Real Application Clusters, Physical vs. Virtual Database” hosted by the Independent Oracle User Group. Here is a sample of some of the key findings in the report:

To access the complete report, visit the IOUG Website sign up for a Free Associate Membership and join the Cloud Computing SIG.

Friday Aug 16, 2013

UPDATE: Sun Ray and VDI Last Order Dates

For important updates and clarifications on Sun Ray and VDI Last Order Dates, please click here to view the updated blog.

Tuesday Aug 13, 2013

Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance: The View from Product Management

First, if you haven't already, read Chris Kawalek's fine summary of today's announcements below.   But, as the head of virtualization product management at Oracle, I thought I'd add some comments.

Our goal, and what we are delivering with the Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance, is to perform all the necessary installation and configuration for the hardware and software to allow you to go from power-on to a running application (or database or middleware) in about an hour.  Already, one press headline has declared "Oracle tar ledningen på nyckelfärdiga servrar".  Now, just in case your Swedish is a bit rusty, that translates to "Oracle Takes the Lead in Turnkey Servers"  So what's all the fuss about?

Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance...or "OVCA" as it likes to be called....is a general-purpose, converged infrastructure appliance focused on providing rapid deployment of not-only your hardware infrastructure but also, by virtue of Oracle VM, of all the application stack it hosts.  Unlike anything else on the market, Oracle has a large portfolio of ready-to-run Oracle VM virtual machines with enterprise applications, databases, and middleware that have already been installed and configured. So you just need to download the VMs from Oracle and deploy them into your environment and they are ready to go as soon as the VM starts. 

Aside from fully automating it to allow it come up and be ready for use very, very quickly, OVCA has been designed to fit easily into your existing data center.  As a general purpose appliance, it supports all the OSes you want to run on x86:  Linux of various flavors, including our favorite Oracle Linux, but also Oracle Solaris, and Microsoft Windows. And it also provides choice and flexibility for external storage by supporting the use of the excellent Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance as well as storage from major 3rd parties including NetApp and EMC.

Oracle has a great line of engineered systems to pretty much meet your every need, whether it is the "Exa-" class systems that are engineered explicitly for extreme performance with specific applications/workloads or whether you are looking at the " -Appliance" class systems focused on extreme ease of use as we are doing with the Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance.  We've been hearing from our customers how much they love their Exa- machines but then they ask us what we've got for "the rest of their stuff", by which they mean legacy software or versions of software, Microsoft servers, or just generally anything that does not demand the extreme performance of the Exa systems.

I tell people that the "Exa-" systems are the supercars of the engineered systems world:  exceptionally fast and very tailored for their purpose, while the Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance is sort of like your favorite minivan:  very easy and convenient to use, with a great set of general purpose features for every day, general purpose use.  Their focus is very different between them, but they are both excellent at what they do.  And, in this sense, they are also very complementary and we expect these products to be companions to each other in a lot of data centers.

One of the aspects about OVCA that is very interesting and increasingly important over-time is that the infrastructure it delivers is software-defined.  The hardware itself is "wire-once": We wire it up completely in the factory, including pulling cables for ethernet, InfiniBand, and power up to each individual slot in the rack regardless as-to whether you have ordered a server to go in that slot or not.  Everything is pre-positioned.  This means you will never have to add or move cables inside the rack as you grow.  If you add a new node in the field, you just push that node into the slot and the cables are already in-place to push into the connectors on the back of the server....Done.  To those of you reading this that have tried to do cabling in a completely full rack, you know why this is important.  Racks today are often packed so densely with cables, it is almost impossible to even squeeze two fingers through to connect or remove an ethernet cable, much less a thicker power- or InfiniBand cable.  

But let's get back to how the compute and network are software defined, which means you can more easily automate it to configure and expand and change it without ever having to walk into the data center to move cables.  This makes you more agile and flexible but also reduces risks of mistakes or damage that come with moving things around in a very densely packed rack.  It also presents the opportunities for adding capabilities down the road without having to change the hardware.

Some of the crown jewels of technology in OVCA that enable this are Oracle VM server virtualization on the Sun servers and Oracle SDN software for the Oracle Virtual Networking Fabric Interconnect hardware.  In effect, Oracle VM enables "software defined servers" while Oracle SDN enables "software defined networking".  This combination allows us to fully automate the system bring-up using the OVCA controller software that serves as an automation and orchestration layer to coordinate the bring-up and on-going configuration activities of OVCA, e.g. discovering servers, putting Oracle VM on them, discovering network hardware, putting software-defined private neworks on them, and then putting the servers into the newly created networks.

Collectively, these capabilities not only produce a great product today but also provide a powerful base for future enhancement and expansion through software.

Since I've only scratched the surface here, to learn more details, a replay of the webcast, including a demo showing the deployment of an Oracle 12c Database in about 52mins from power-on can be found here.

All the information on oracle.com can be found here or by going to www.oracle.com/ovca 

And for those of you that are thrilled by the gripping prose usually found in press releases, click here

So keep an eye out for new information over time on this blog or drop us a Comment below.  And, of course, your friendly Oracle account manager or partner would be glad to discuss how you might be able to benefit from standing up a complete application stack in about an hour.

Tuesday Nov 06, 2012

Oracle VM at the IOUG Virtualization SIG – Online Symposium

Join the Oracle VM product managers and product experts for a day full of best practices and information on the latest product updates. A sampling of what you can expect:

  • Best practices from a customer’s perspective on deployment of Oracle VM and Oracle RAC.
  • How to simplify and accelerate the onboarding of your applications to the cloud with Oracle Virtual Assemblies and Enterprise Manager 12c.
  • The latest how-to and demo of DeployCluster Tool on Oracle VM 3.

Date: Tomorrow, November 7th, 10am CDT – 2:50pm CDT

Monday Jul 30, 2012

ANNOUNCEMENT: Oracle VM 3 Templates Available for Sun Ray Software 5.3

Following up from our announcement of Oracle VM 3 templates for Oracle Secure Global Desktop last month, today, we are proud to announce the general availability of Oracle VM 3 templates for Sun Ray Software version 5.3. 

With Oracle VM 3 templates, anyone using Oracle VM 3 need not download, install and configure the supported operating system and the Oracle product(s) individually. In this case, the supported operating system (Oracle Linux 5.7), and Sun Ray Software 5.3 product is packaged together into a template that one can easily import and clone from as a virtual machine in Oracle VM 3. This results in a nearly instant deployment and configuration of Sun Ray Software within Oracle VM 3. 

Login into the Oracle VM section at Oracle Software Delivery Cloud  (click on 'Cloud Portal (Main)' at the top-right) and, Under Oracle VM templates - x86 64-bit, look for
  • Oracle VM 3 Template (OVF) for Sun Ray Software Media Pack for x86_64 (64 bit) (64 bit)
    • Oracle VM 3 template for Sun Ray Software 5.3 with Oracle Linux 5.7 (64-bit)

Once you download the above template, you must 

  1. First import the assembly (ova) file that you downloaded from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud
  2. Next, create a virtual machine template from the assembly
  3. And finally create a virtual machine from the template

Once the virtual machine is created and starts up, make sure you enter the networking parameters (hostname, IP address, netmask, gateway etc), and optional user parameters correctly. You must also enter a root password during first boot. And that's it - the Sun Ray Software installation script will automatically pick up the networking parameters, prompt for confirmation and complete a default installation.

Once the installation is complete, you may may then begin to use a supported Sun Ray hardware client or Oracle Virtual Desktop Client software to connect to the Sun Ray server and use the default Oracle Linux desktop. You may also want to refer to the Sun Ray Software Administration Guide to learn more about Sun Ray Software and its capabilities.
About

Get the latest scoop on products, strategy, events, news, and more, from Oracle's virtualization experts

Twitter

Facebook

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today