Friday May 31, 2013

Friday Tips #30

I'm always a fan of round numbers, and today we bring you the 30th edition of our Friday tips series!

This week, it's another video on the Oracle VM Command Line Interface video from Greg King, Principal Best Practices Consultant, Oracle VM Product Management. This one covers the object relationships in the Oracle VM command line interface:

Thanks Greg!

See you all next week with another tip.

-Chris 

Friday May 24, 2013

Friday Tips #29

We hope you're having a great Friday! We've got another tip from our Oracle VM Command Line Interface video series for you this week from Greg King, Principal Best Practices Consultant, Oracle VM Product Management. This one is on the basics of the Oracle VM command line interface:

Thanks Greg!

And we'll see you all next week with another tip!

-Chris 

Friday May 17, 2013

Friday Tips #28

Happy Friday, folks! We've got another video tip for you this week from Greg King, Principal Best Practices Consultant, Oracle VM Product Management. This one is on the interactive help features of the Oracle VM command line interface:

Thanks Greg!

And we'll see you all next week with another tip!

-Chris 

Friday Apr 19, 2013

Friday Tips #24

We've got another video tip for you this week from Greg King, Principal Best Practices Consultant, Oracle VM Product Management. This one is on setting up SSH keys to make it quicker to log in to the command line interface for Oracle VM:

We'll see you next week with another tip! Remember, if you want to ask us something directly, you can post on Twitter tagged with #askoraclevirtualization.

-Chris 

Friday Mar 15, 2013

Friday Tips #19

Happy Friday!

In our Friday tip #12, we had a discussion on how to use the Oracle VM command line interface. This week's tip follows up on that with a very nice video from Greg King, Principal Best Practices Consultant, Oracle VM Product Mangement. In this video, Greg shows you how to get started with the command line interface:

Tech Tip - How to Get Started with the Oracle VM Command Line Interface

We'll see you next week for our first (modest) milestone, the 20th Friday tip blog!

-Chris 

Friday Jan 25, 2013

Friday Tips #12

Our tip this week is about the newly released Oracle VM 3.2. For some background, you might also want to check out this related tip on updating Oracle VM Manager.

Question:
How do I get started with the command line interface for Oracle VM Manager?

Answer by Gregory King, Principal Best Practices Consultant, Oracle VM Product Management:
Oracle VM 3 ships with an automation tool that system administrators are going to love! Beginning with the latest version of 3.2, our Oracle VM 3 product comes with a built-in command line interface (CLI) that allows system administrators to create automated solutions using their favorite shell or scripting language. For example, you can create a bash or ksh script using calls to the CLI to gather information about objects and attributes managed by the Oracle VM Manager. You can also include CLI calls to change objects and attributes as well as initiate tasks such as putting a server into maintenance mode and then starting a software update using our built-in Server Update Manager.

Check Your Access to the CLI
The CLI is started automatically when the Oracle VM Manager is started during boot or whenever you execute “service ovmm start” on the server where Oracle VM Manager is installed. Test the ability to connect to the CLI first by logging in using ssh. You can execute the ssh session from any server with an ssh client – you should really test the login from the server where the automation scripts will reside. Perhaps you want to write the scripts and keep them on the same server where Oracle VM Manager is installed or perhaps you want to keep the scripts on a management/administration server where you keep all your other management scripts – the choice is really up to you.

Let’s assume for our example you are going to keep the scripts on a Linux server named “myserver”. Simply execute the ssh command shown below to test your login.  The CLI will prompt you for a password – this is the same password you use for the admin user when you log into the Oracle VM Manager.

You can see a list of available commands by typing either help or “?” at the command prompt as shown below.

You will most likely want to add ssh keys on the Oracle VM Management server to allow your script to execute without prompting for a password.  If your scripts are going to be executed as root from myserver, then add the public keys from myserver:/root/.ssh/*.pub into a single file named ovmcli_authorized_keys and copy the file to the oracle home directory on mymanager:/home/oracle/.ssh/ovmcli_authorized_keys. Make sure the ovmcli_authorized_keys file is owned by oracle and the group is dba – I always change the permissions to 644, but I’m not sure that is actually needed. The CLI will prompt for a password the first time after copying the file to that directory, but will not prompt again afterwards.

Thanks Greg. For more information on Oracle VM 3.2, have a read through Honglin's excellent blog entry on this very blog.

We'll see you next week!

-Chris 

Wednesday Jun 27, 2012

Get the latest Oracle VM updates

We have released the latest Oracle VM updates for both x86 and SPARC. 

For Oracle VM Server for SPARC:

  • Oracle Solaris 11 SRU8.5 includes Oracle VM server for SPARC 2.2 so if you're already running a Solaris 11 as the control domain. All you need do is a 'pkg update' to get the latest 2.2 bits. Learn more how to upgrade to the latest Oracle VM Server for SPARC 2.2 release on Solaris 11 here and consult the documentation for further details.

For Oracle VM Server for x86

For more information about Oracle's virtualization, visit oracle.com/virtualization.

Tuesday Nov 10, 2009

Announcing Oracle VM Manager CLI 2.2

We are pleased to announce that Oracle VM Manager Command Line Interface (CLI) 2.2 has been released to Oracle Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) and Oracle's Public Yum Repository.

The Oracle VM Manager CLI 2.2 is the updated version to work with newly released Oracle VM Manager 2.2, and it can also work with Oracle VM Manager 2.1.5. The CLI is written in Python and uses the Oracle VM Manager Web Services API to communicate with Oracle VM Manager. You can use the CLI to perform the same functions as Oracle VM Manager, such as managing all your server pools and guests. The CLI commands can be scripted, thus bring more flexibility to help customers deploy and manage Oracle VM environment.

1. Download required RPMs from ULN or Oracle's Public Yum Repository.

Package

ULN Channel / Public Yum Repository
ovmcli-2.2-9.el5.noarch.rpm el5_i386_oracle_addons and el5_x86_64_oracle_addons
python-ZSI-2.1-a1.el5.noarch.rpm

el5_i386_addons and el5_x86_64_addons

2. Install the RPMs onto a server running Oracle Linux 5:

# rpm -Uvh ovmcli-2.2-9.el5.noarch.rpm python-ZSI-2.1-a1.el5.noarch.rpm

3. Configure CLI by running "ovm config". The user will be asked for the following information:

- Oracle VM Manager hostname

- Oracle VM Manager port number

- Deploy path (use default)

- Location of vncviewer (required for vncviewer command)

- Enable or disable HTTPS support (depends on Oracle VM Manager setup)

4. Oracle VM Manager CLI is now ready for use. Just type the command "ovm". For example,

# ovm help
# ovm help all
# ovm -u admin -p password svrp ls
# ovm -u admin -p password shell 

See additional resources:

Friday Jul 24, 2009

Announcing Oracle VM Manager Command Line Interface (CLI)

We are pleased to announce that Oracle VM Manager Command Line Interface (CLI) was released to Oracle Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) today.

The CLI is written in Python and uses the Oracle VM Manager Web Services API to communicate with Oracle VM Manager. You can use the CLI to perform the same functions as Oracle VM Manager, such as managing all your server pools and guests. The CLI commands can be scripted, thus bring more flexibility to help customers deploy and manage Oracle VM environment.

1. Download required RPMs from ULN.

 












Package

ULN Channel
ovmcli-1.0-1.el5.noarch.rpm el5_i386_oracle_addons and el5_x86_64_oracle_addons
python-ZSI-2.1-a1.el5.noarch.rpm

el5_i386_addons and el5_x86_64_addons

 

2. Install the RPMs onto a server running Enterprise Linux
# rpm -Uvh ovmcli-0.1-17.el5.noarch.rpm python-ZSI-2.1-a1.el5.noarch.rpm

3. Configure CLI by running "ovm config". The user will be asked for the following information:
- Oracle VM Manager hostname
- Oracle VM Manager port number
- Deploy path (use default)
- Location of vncviewer (required for vncviewer command)
- Enable or disable HTTPS support (depends on Oracle VM Manager setup)

4. Oracle VM Manager CLI is now ready for use. Just type the command "ovm". For example,
# ovm help
# ovm help all
# ovm -u admin -p password svrp ls
# ovm -u admin -p password shell

See additional resources at:
* Blog: Oracle VM CLI RPM is available
* Blog: Oracle VM Manager CLI and Web Services API
* Oracle VM Documentation

Update: Aug 14, 2009, The Oracle VM Manager Command Line Interface: Introduction, Installation, Configuration and Command Examples

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