Dynamic Launch in Oracle Secure Global Desktop

In an earlier entry, Oracle Secure Global Desktop and Oracle VDI, we mentioned the dynamic launch feature in Secure Global Desktop and described how we used that feature to connect the two products.  Here's a summary of that integration:

SGD and VDI

Now is a good time to dig a bit deeper into dynamic launch.

Dynamic Launch

There are three parts to it:

  • Dynamic Applications
  • Dynamic Application Servers
  • Brokers

Dynamic Applications

A dynamic application is a type of object in Secure Global Desktop that maps to one or more other applications and offers a user a choice between those applications.  Normally, you would map related applications, like a workflow, or alternatives, where you would expect a user to run only one of the applications at any one time.  'My Desktop' is an example of the latter: it is a dynamic application that maps to a Unix desktop and a Windows desktop, the thinking being that most users would run one or the other, but not both simultaneously.

Dynamic Application Servers

A dynamic application server is an object that tells Secure Global Desktop to execute some code to determine where an application should run.  It can be assigned to an application object just like other application servers and the code is executed when the application is launched.  The code is delivered as a broker.

Brokers

A broker is a Java class that implements a simple interface and is a property of a dynamic application server.  Currently, Secure Global Desktop ships with three brokers:

  • SGD Broker: when this is assigned to an application object, it grabs all the other (real) application servers assigned to the application and presents the user with a choice
  • User-defined SGD Broker: an extension of the SGD Broker that adds the option for a user to enter a host name
  • VDI Broker: this is used to provision hosts through VDI

Together, they provide a structured, flexible and extensible system: a single dynamic application in a user's workspace can open up a wealth of choices.  Let's consider a scenario where a user needs to run a range of web applications that require different browser types and versions.  One solution in Secure Global Desktop would be to create separate items for each type of browser and publish them to the workspace.  Alternatively, you could create a dynamic application that maps to the different types of browser and logically group them together.  And this can be taken a step further: by assigning a dynamic application server to an application, that browser could be run on a server dynamically provisioned through VDI or whatever hypervisor the broker has been written to handle.

Dynamic Launch

So, three key components make up dynamic launch.  Two of them, dynamic applications and dynamic application servers, are part of the Secure Global Desktop infrastructure and plumb the feature into the datastore, workspace and launch process.  They belong in the administrator's realm.  The third component, the broker, provides extensibility.  Secure Global Desktop ships with a broker to deliver VMs provisioned through Oracle VDI, but the open interfaces mean it does not have to stop there. To go further, we must enter the developer's world and write a little code.  Next time...


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