Wednesday Aug 14, 2013

A mensagem de UX Design Patterns da Oracle vai para o Brasil

ORKUTIFIED! Uma grande lição do Brasil sobre o que acontece quando aplicações não dão aos usuários a experiência que eles realmente querem.

Aplicações precisam oferecer uma experiência moderna e atraente para manter os usuários de hoje em dia satisfeitos. Atender as demandas de usabilidade ao modo do consumidor para aplicações desktop e móveis, utilizadas também para o trabalho é vital na empresa. A experiência do usuário é o caminho, mas você não precisa ser um expert em construir aplicações que oferecem aos clientes um retorno de investimento maior ou que torna os negócios mais produtivos e usuários satisfeitos. Como o super livro Don't Make Me Think diz, você precisa “de uma abordagem de senso comum para usabilidade.”


Parceiros Oracle o conhecimento para construir de forma produtiva aplicativos com  excelente usabilidade

O workshop Oracle Applications User Experience "Building Great-Looking Usable Apps: Applying Oracle’s Best UX Design Practices in ADF and ADF Mobile" realizado em São Paulo, Brasil, e organizado pela Oracle Partner Network utilizando Oracle Application Development Framework, entregou aos parceiros Oracle o conhecimento para construir de forma produtiva aplicativos com excelente usabilidade.

O time Oracle Applications UX fez todo o trabalho científico para que os desenvolvedores de aplicativos e integrações não tenham que fazê-lo! Desenvolvedores que utilizam Oracle ADF e os comprovados Oracle Applications User Experience Design Patterns para resolver problemas comuns de usabilidade, podem facilmente, construir aplicações que os usuários vão ficar impressionados, ganhar produtividade e mesmo assim não precisarão pensar para utilizá-las.

Leia mais sobre o evento no blog Usable Apps Oracle.

Monday Sep 19, 2011

Squirting is a Software Experience? Mind Your Language, Please

The language used in an application's user interface (UI) is a critical aspect of the user experience (UX), bit one often overlook. Des Traynor (@destraynor) brought this importance artfully to life at Refresh Dublin in his presentation on the Language of Interfaces. Well worth checking out, Des emphasized how language choice determines user action and engagement, with the simple choice of text for a button label or placeholder for status update making all the difference.

In Oracle Fusion Applications, for example, there's a big difference between the button labels Save, Submit, or Done, and the action that they imply to take on a page. Save implies an intermediate state during data object or process creation that the user will return to later before the task can be finalized. Submit is a final action, committing an object to the database or handing off a process, thus ending the task. Done is generally used to conclude the user review of a read-only page, closing it.

Save and Submit buttons together on a page


Google Wave's choice of Done however (as pointed out by Des) didn't help much with the puzzling concept of what anyone was expected to do with a wave to begin with. Language alone isn't going to save a rubbish UX.

Google Wave UI Done button


Des used some great examples from social media to as examples. Compare the language and action implied of the Facebook friend with the LinkedIn contact or the contact categorizations of Google+'s circles. Determining the action should shift from a third-person to first person paradigm led Facebook to change its status update text to What's on your mind? Twitter switched from What are you doing? to What's happening?

US English Twitter and Facebook status placeholder text

Not every natural language follows the English direction however. What's up with that? And, what about the challenges offered by crowdsourced language (as in the Dutch version of Twitter)? Facebook's community translation feature, as I pointed out before, is as much a user engagement strategy as a way of obtaining translated UIs (but not help) very quickly for the local market.

French and Dutch Twitter status placeholder text

French and German Facebook Status Placeholder Text

This choice of evolving or action-intended words can be a challenge for controlling the action globally. My old friend Frank Dietz in Multilingual magazine tells of the challenge of finding German translations for gaming concepts (buff, debuff, kiting, toon hop, and so on) for example, having to rely on transcreation, Denglisch, or the English term itself.


What the presentation didn't cover was how the language in the UI drives the creation of language around the intended action within the user community too. Unfriend, for example, appeared nowhere in the Facebook UI, but is a well-established word now. ReTweeting (or RTing) was a term and concept that came from the Twitter community, before it was codified. Personalization features that allow users to control the language or add their own are critical UX features too, particularly in the mobile space.

Apple iOS5 shortcut personalization feature

As for the choice of squirting to convey the sharing of music in Microsoft Zune (see Des's presentation), well, nobody over the age of five should be squirting anything at anybody, should they? What were they thinking? And yet,they're back with internet charms...


Find those comments...

Sunday Nov 21, 2010

Keeping It Simple, Yet Effective: Facebook's I18n Best Practices

I picked up a request on Twitter, asking for help in explaining the concept of "string concatenation" to a nontechnical audience. I struggled for a bit, and then remembered the excellent Facebook internationalization (I18n) materials. I sent them on, and was thanked. Job done. Here's how Facebook dealt with the issue:

concatenation.png

(Image copyright Facebook, 2010)

Notice how the word "concatenation" never appears at all? That's smart. The audience for the materials is not made up of seasoned developers or professional linguists. Why bring such a technical term into the conversation when it can be explained in simple terms--with examples too?

I've long maintained one of the problems with internationalization is that developers and linguists don't actually know how to communicate with each other--even when they think they speak the same natural language. Facebook has done a great job in solving that problem with simply worded I18n guidelines with real-world examples that everyone can understand. We should learn that lesson and apply it.

Wednesday Jul 07, 2010

Nuances Of European Social Media

Really like the resource Lost in Translation: Nuances of European Social Media, and so will you if you ever wondered if there was a European equivalent of SXSW! There are some good conference references as well as suggested Twitter followers. The following also caught my eye:

"Cultural differences. This can't be stressed enough: Europe is not just another USA. Europe isn't even Europe, so to speak, but a large number of individual countries. Or as David Weinberger would put it: Small pieces loosely joined. One example I like to give is the role of personal branding. It's almost a mantra in the US that it is important to build your personal brand. In Europe, this won't get you far. In Germany or the UK pointing out your successes is - except when done very tactfully - considered boasting rather than legitimate communication. It'll put people off. Culture clash, anyone?"

How this pans out in the enterprise space, of course, is another question, but the point about not making sweeping cultural assumptions is well made. On that subject, check out the articlea "Six Languages Appear on This Week's List of Emerging Facebook Apps" and "Facebook looks east to complete domination" (or should that be west, given the Facebook HQ's location?).

About

Oracle applications user experience (UX) assistance. UX and development outreach of all sorts to the apps community, helping to design and deliver usable apps.

Profile

Ultan Ó Broin. Director, Global Applications User Experience, Oracle Corporation. On Twitter: @ultan

See my other Oracle blog about product globalization too: Not Lost in Translation

Interests: User experience (UX), user centered design, design patterns, tailoring, BYOD, dev relations, language quality, mobile apps, Oracle FMW and ADF, and a lot more.

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today