Monday Dec 08, 2014

Capturing that Applications User Experience: What Happens Offline Is As Important as Online

Communicating why UX is important is all about a good story, one preferably backed by facts and one that ends in a conclusion that resonates with the user!

At a recent Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) roadshow in London, OAUX VP Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley) told the audience of customers and partners how most sales reps still liked to write down opportunity and other sales details at the time using paper and pen. True to form, a glance around the room revealed that insight to be true!

Capture. Simple way to get information into the cloud

Capture: A simple and consistent way to get data into the cloud, reflecting the flexibility of the way we work today.

It's also a reminder that when it comes to UX design, an empathy with what happens offline is as important as what happens online.

This behavior has been observed in ethnographic studies of real reps, of course. In addition to the fact that sales reps can have a dislike of enterprise apps (with good reason in the past) and will use anything necessary to close that deal, there is strong evidence to suggest that the act of writing things down aids recall later.

Yet, sales information still needs to be entered into the applications cloud as part of the overall sales process for reps to eventually close the deal. Enter Capture, an easy way to get that information into the cloud.

Capture is one of the four common actions we design for that delivers a consistent experience across devices using the same data in the cloud. So, if a rep writes something down, hey, they can quickly use Capture to get those details into the enterprise system over the next coffee after their meeting!

You can read more about Capture and how it fits into our UX approach in the free Oracle Applications User Experience Strategy and Trends eBook.

ADF Devs: Your Maximum Mobile ERPness Is Here

I recently received a question from a boutique Oracle ADF development shop on the other side of the equator about how they could get started taking their ERP mobile apps' UI to the latest and greatest.

Oracle Alta UI: A modern mobile and browser application design system

Oracle Alta UI: A modern mobile and browser application design system.

No problem! Here's how: Check out the Oracle Alta UI website from the Oracle ADF team. It's a great developer solution for design and building of modern UIs on smartphone and tablet using ADF.

And, for support, leverage the ADF EMG forum, another community-based resource that shares awesome developer insights into productively building mobile apps for the enterprise.

Happy ERPing!

Thursday Oct 03, 2013

Simple to Use, Simple to Design, Simple to Build at UKOUG Apps 13

Come to the UK Oracle User Group's Applications Conference 2013 in London and see Kristin Desmond and myself deliver a powerful message about Tailoring Your Applications User Experiences in the Cloud.


Simplified UI: Simple to Use, Simple to Design, Simple to Build


Simplified UI: Simple to Use, Simple to Design, Simple to Build


Featuring the Release 7 Simplified User Interface experience for our cloud applications, we'll show you how to enable your business to take charge of tailoring your own modern and compelling UI that delivers on usability without needing the IT department, how you can design a new great user experience and partner integrations using UX design patterns, and how you won't have to write a line of code to build any of this. And all in the cloud. A must for partners and customers alike!

See you there!

And there's more from the Applications User Experience team at that event too. Check out the other UX sessions too. Don't miss 'em!

Thursday Mar 28, 2013

Showtime! FUSE and Friends at OBUG Connect 2013

Just back from Oracle Benelux User Group's (OBUG) Connect 2013 where, together with Jeffrey Pease, Oracle Applications Labs VP, we demoed “FUSE”. FUSE is an internal name really, one that got away and has stuck; but make no mistake, it was Oracle Fusion Applications that we showed!

FUSE is a browser-based, cross-device, simplified and lightweight UX for self-service, casual and frequently performed tasks. Built using Oracle ADF, rendered in HTML5 with CSS3, and leveraging cloud infrastructure, this UI is optimized for navigation and action, action, action.

Jeffrey with the new face of Oracle Fusion Applications (HCM) on iPad

Jeffrey with the new face of Oracle Fusion Applications on iPad, projected live onto the big screen.
Ultan at the controls. (photo: Ultan O'Broin)

Intuitive, intelligent, and integrated with other Fusion UI optimizations, what the audience saw was a UX informed by COIT and BYOD trends, and designed to meet the high expectations about modern apps that our users communicate to us. It was awe-inspiring to see the sleek UX put through its paces on an iPad and projected onto the huge movie screen at Connect 2013’s Kinepolis cinema center location.

So, watch out for news of this new face of Fusion Applications coming to events and browsers near you.

iPads and Apps in Your Hands

Jeffrey also demoed the fantastic mobile analytic apps for sales leaders called Mobilytics, live in the session too. So, in about 45 mins, we showed off four demos on iPad, MacBook Air, and Chromebook, did some Q & A, and let the audience come up and play with apps on the tablet. A very lively and interactive session. No PowerPoint karaoke there!

Jeffrey wows with mobile sales cloud analytics

Jeffrey wows with Mobilytics, live from his iPad. (photo: Ultan O'Broin)

Mobile UX Design Patterns are in Business

Later in the day, along with Fusion User Experience Advocate (FXA) Lonneke Dikmans (@lonnekedikmans) of Vennster, we presented on Mobile UX Design Patterns. We called out how these design patterns enabled productive building of apps by customers and partners which combined with the security and code-once model of Mobile ADF make this the perfect solution for enterprise apps deployment. You can read more about our presentation on the Vennster blog.

The OBUG Connect conference in 2013 was a great event. Don’t miss it next year and watch out for more events from OBUG (@OBUG_ORG) too, an organization that continues to go from strength to strength. Bring your popcorn.

Monday Jul 16, 2012

Apps Consumer Experience & Contextual Actions Guideline

Here's one of our Oracle Fusion Applications User Experience Advocates Sten Vesterli (@stevesterli) talking with our own Kathy Miedema about how consumer expectations about the look and usability of modern, attractive websites are driving applications user experience (UX) in the enterprise and how Oracle Fusion Applications delivers!

Great video, also offering some insights into what the Oracle Application Development Framework af:table faces component and persistence change framework means for user personalization too. The building blocks of our UX are the Oracle Fusion Applications patterns and guidelines, now available for developers to take our usability even further and to give their user interfaces a totally awesome consumer makeover.

I'd like to highlight one of our guidelines that you really do need to know about for that modern UX: The Contextual Actions guideline.


Contextual Actions guideline explains how to elegantly streamline users access to information without navigating away from tasks

Contextual actions are a supercool and fast way for you to let users have more information right there in the user interface. Users hate navigating away for this kind of stuff as its a total productivity killer. Now, the contextual action dialog box gives users easy access to a whole bunch of objects and actions right away while they stay engaged with, and completing, the immediate task.

Read more about how Oracle Fusion Applications CRM uses this contextual action feature, and it's used throughout the applications suite too. There are contextual actions dialog boxes, like the one I've shown for Person, for 10 other business objects in Fusion Apps, including Organization, Customer Account, Item, Project, and so on.

And, don't forget we have even more videos about Oracle Applications User Experience on the Usable Apps YouTube channel too!

Monday Jul 09, 2012

Schmelp Portal, Help Portal: Oracle Fusion Applications Help Online

Yes, the Oracle Fusion Applications Help (or "Help Portal" to us insiders) is now available. Click the link fusionhelp.oracle.com and check it out! Built using Oracle Application Development Framework components.

Oracle Fusion Applications Help user interface

Oracle Fusion Applications Help user interface

If you're developing your own help for Fusion Apps, then you can use the newly published Oracle Fusion Help User Interface Guidelines to understand the best usage. These guidelines are also a handy way to get to the embedded help design patterns for Oracle Fusion Applications, now also available.

To customize and extend the help content itself no longer requires the engagement of your IT Department or expensive project work. Customers can now use the Manage Custom Help capability to edit or add whatever content they need, make it secure and searchable, and develop a community around it too. You can see more of that capability in this slideshare.net presentation from UKOUG Ireland 2012 about the Oracle Fusion Applications User Assistance and Support Ecosystem by Ultan O'Broin and Richard Bingham.

Manage Custom Help capability

Manage Custom Help capability

To understand the science and craft that went into the creation and delivery of the "Help Portal" (cardiac arrests all round in Legal and Marketing Depts), then check out this great white paper by Ultan O'Broin and Laurie Pattison: Putting the User into Oracle Fusion Applications User Assistance.

So, what's with this "Help Portal" name? Well, that's an internal (that is, internal to Oracle) name only and we should all really call it by the correct product listing name: Oracle Fusion Applications Help. To be honest, I don't care what you call it as long as it is useful. However, these internal names can be problematic when talking with support or the licensing people. For years, we referred casually to the Oracle Applications Help or Oracle Applications Help System that ships with the Oracle E-Business Suite products as "iHelp". Then, somebody went and bought Siebel.

Game over.

Tuesday Jun 12, 2012

Tweeting about Oracle Applications Usability: Points to Consider

Here are a few pointers to anyone interested in tweeting about Oracle Applications usability or user experience (UX). These are based on my own experiences and practice, and may not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle, of course (touché, see the footer).


  • If you are an Oracle employee and tweet about our offerings, then read up and follow the corporate social media policy. For the record, I tweet under the following account names: @ultan, @localization, @gamifyOracle, and @usableapps. The last two are supposedly Oracle subject-dedicated, but I do mix it up on occassion.

  • Complete the Twitter account profile, and add a profile picture too. Disclose your interest. Don’t leave either the profile or image blank if you want to be taken seriously (or followed by me).

  • Don’t tweet from a locked down ("protected") Twitter account, as your messages cannot be circulated to anyone who doesn't follow you. Open up the account to all if you really want to get that UX message out.

  • Stay on message. The usable apps website, Misha Vaughan's VoX blog, and the Oracle Applications blog are good sources of UX messages and information, but you can find many other product team, individual, and corporate-wide sources with a little bit of searching. Set up a Google Alert with likely keywords and obtain a daily digest of new information right in your inbox.

  • Add your own insight and wit to the message, were relevant. Just circulating and RTing stock headlines adds no value to your effort or to the reader, and is somewhat lazy, in my opinion. That said, don't steal other people's insight and links either. Attribute where appropriate.

  • Leave room for RTing of your tweet. So, don’t max out those 140 characters. Keep it under 130 if you want to be RTed without modification (or at all-I am not a fan of modifying tweets [MT], way too much effort for the medium). Use URL shorteners, remove articles and punctuation marks and use fragments, abbreviations, and so on at will to keep the tweet short enough, but leave keywords intact, as people search on those.

  • Follow any Fusion UX Advocates who are on Twitter too (you can search for these names), and not just Oracle employees. Don't just follow the people you like or think like you, or those who you think like you or are like-minded. Take a look at who is following or being followed by whom and er, follow up.

  • Create and socialize others to use an easily remembered or typed hashtag, or use what’s already popularized (for an event or conference, for example). We used #gamifyOracle for the Applications UX gamification design jam, and other popular applications UX ones are #fusionapps and #usableapps (or at least I’m trying to popularize it). But, before you start the messaging, if you want to keep a record of the hashtag traffic and analyze it, then set it up with an archiving service. Twitter’s own tweet lifespan is short.

  • Don't confuse hashtags (#) with Twitter handles (@) that have the same name. Sending a tweet to @gamifyOracle will just be seen by @gamifyOracle (me) and any followers we have in common. Sending it to #gamifyOracle is seen by anyone following or searching for that hashtag.

  • No dissing the competition. But there is no rule about not following them on Twitter to see the market reactions to Oracle announcements enabling you to tailor your own message accordingly.

  • Don’t be boring. Mix it up a bit. Every 10th or so tweet, divert into other areas of interest, personal ones, even. No constant “Thank you Joe Schmoe for giving me +K for this, that, and the other” or “I just ousted Mr X as Mayor of on foursquare" pouring into the Twitterstream, please. I just don’t care and will probably unfollow pretty quickly.

And now, your Twitter tips and experiences with this subject? Them go in the comments...

About

Oracle applications user experience (UX) assistance. UX and development outreach of all sorts to the apps dev community, helping to design and deliver usable apps in the cloud.

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Ultan Ó Broin. Director, Global Applications User Experience, Oracle Corporation. On Twitter: @ultan

See my other Oracle blog about product globalization too: Not Lost in Translation

Interests: User experience (UX), user centered design, design patterns, tailoring, BYOD, dev relations, language quality, mobile apps, Oracle FMW and ADF, and a lot more.

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