Friday Jun 22, 2012

Top Fusion Apps User Experience Functional UI Patterns & Guidelines Every Apps Dev Should Know

We've announced the availability of the Oracle Fusion Applications user experience design patterns. Developers can get going on these using the Design Filter Tool (or DeFT) to select the best pattern for the context of use.


Design Filter Tool (DeFT)

Design Filter Tool selects the best pattern for your user and task.

As you drill into the patterns you will discover more guidelines from the Applications User Experience team and some from the Rich Client User Interface team too that are also leveraged in Fusion Apps. All are based on the Oracle Application Development Framework components.

To accelerate your Fusion apps development and tailoring, here's some inside insight into the really important patterns and guidelines that every apps developer needs to know about. They start at a broad Fusion Apps information architecture level and then become more granular at the page and task levels.

Information Architecture: These guidelines explain how the basic construction of an Oracle Fusion application user interface, enabling you to understand where your new components and changes fit into the overall application's information architecture. So, begin with the UI Shell and Navigation guidelines, and then move on to page-level design using the Work Areas and Dashboards guidelines.

Page Content: These patterns and guidelines cover the most common interactions that are used to complete tasks productively, starting with core interactions that are generally common across all pages, and then moving onto the more task-specific ones.

Core Across All Pages

Task Dependent


Now, armed with all this great insider design information, get developing some great-looking, highly usable apps! Let me know in the comments how things go!

Oracle Fusion Apps Functional UI Design Patterns Available For Devs Worldwide

The Oracle Fusion Applications user experience design patterns are published! These new, reusable usability solutions and best-practices, which will join the Oracle dashboard patterns and guidelines that are already available online, are used by Oracle to artfully bring to life a new standard in the user experience, or UX, of enterprise applications. Now, the Oracle applications development community can benefit from the science behind the Oracle Fusion Applications user experience, too.


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The design patterns are based on Oracle ADF components and easily implemented in Oracle JDeveloper.

These Oracle Fusion Applications UX Design Patterns, or blueprints, enable Oracle applications developers and system implementers everywhere to leverage professional usability insight when:


  • tailoring an Oracle Fusion application,
  • creating coexistence solutions that existing users will be delighted with, thus enabling graceful user transitions to Oracle Fusion Applications down the road, or
  • designing exciting, new, highly usable applications in the cloud or on-premise.

Based on the Oracle Application Development Framework (ADF) components, the Oracle Fusion Applications patterns and guidelines are proven with real users and in the Applications UX usability labs, so you can get right to work coding productivity-enhancing designs that provide an advantage for your entire business.

What’s the best way to get started? We’ve made that easy, too. The Design Filter Tool (DeFT) selects the best pattern for your user type and task. Simply adapt your selection for your own task flow and content, and you’re on your way to a really great applications user experience.

More Oracle applications design patterns and training are coming your way in the future. To provide feedback on the sets that are currently available, let me know in the comments!.

Tuesday Jun 12, 2012

Tweeting about Oracle Applications Usability: Points to Consider

Here are a few pointers to anyone interested in tweeting about Oracle Applications usability or user experience (UX). These are based on my own experiences and practice, and may not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle, of course (touché, see the footer).


  • If you are an Oracle employee and tweet about our offerings, then read up and follow the corporate social media policy. For the record, I tweet under the following account names: @ultan, @localization, @gamifyOracle, and @usableapps. The last two are supposedly Oracle subject-dedicated, but I do mix it up on occassion.

  • Complete the Twitter account profile, and add a profile picture too. Disclose your interest. Don’t leave either the profile or image blank if you want to be taken seriously (or followed by me).

  • Don’t tweet from a locked down ("protected") Twitter account, as your messages cannot be circulated to anyone who doesn't follow you. Open up the account to all if you really want to get that UX message out.

  • Stay on message. The usable apps website, Misha Vaughan's VoX blog, and the Oracle Applications blog are good sources of UX messages and information, but you can find many other product team, individual, and corporate-wide sources with a little bit of searching. Set up a Google Alert with likely keywords and obtain a daily digest of new information right in your inbox.

  • Add your own insight and wit to the message, were relevant. Just circulating and RTing stock headlines adds no value to your effort or to the reader, and is somewhat lazy, in my opinion. That said, don't steal other people's insight and links either. Attribute where appropriate.

  • Leave room for RTing of your tweet. So, don’t max out those 140 characters. Keep it under 130 if you want to be RTed without modification (or at all-I am not a fan of modifying tweets [MT], way too much effort for the medium). Use URL shorteners, remove articles and punctuation marks and use fragments, abbreviations, and so on at will to keep the tweet short enough, but leave keywords intact, as people search on those.

  • Follow any Fusion UX Advocates who are on Twitter too (you can search for these names), and not just Oracle employees. Don't just follow the people you like or think like you, or those who you think like you or are like-minded. Take a look at who is following or being followed by whom and er, follow up.

  • Create and socialize others to use an easily remembered or typed hashtag, or use what’s already popularized (for an event or conference, for example). We used #gamifyOracle for the Applications UX gamification design jam, and other popular applications UX ones are #fusionapps and #usableapps (or at least I’m trying to popularize it). But, before you start the messaging, if you want to keep a record of the hashtag traffic and analyze it, then set it up with an archiving service. Twitter’s own tweet lifespan is short.

  • Don't confuse hashtags (#) with Twitter handles (@) that have the same name. Sending a tweet to @gamifyOracle will just be seen by @gamifyOracle (me) and any followers we have in common. Sending it to #gamifyOracle is seen by anyone following or searching for that hashtag.

  • No dissing the competition. But there is no rule about not following them on Twitter to see the market reactions to Oracle announcements enabling you to tailor your own message accordingly.

  • Don’t be boring. Mix it up a bit. Every 10th or so tweet, divert into other areas of interest, personal ones, even. No constant “Thank you Joe Schmoe for giving me +K for this, that, and the other” or “I just ousted Mr X as Mayor of on foursquare" pouring into the Twitterstream, please. I just don’t care and will probably unfollow pretty quickly.

And now, your Twitter tips and experiences with this subject? Them go in the comments...

Sunday Jun 03, 2012

Gamification: Oracle Well and Truly Engaged

Here is a quick roundup of Oracle gamification events and activities. But first, some admissions to a mis-spent youth from Oracle vice presidents Jeremy Ashley, Nigel King, Mike Rulf, Dave Stephens, and Clive Swan, (the video was used as an introduction to the Oracle Applications User Experience Gamification Design Jam):



Other videos from that day are available, including the event teaser A History of Games, and some gamification unplugged. On to the specifics:


If you know of more Oracle gamification events or articles of interest, then find the comments.

About

Oracle applications user experience (UX) assistance. UX and development outreach of all sorts to the apps community, helping to design and deliver usable apps.

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Ultan Ó Broin. Director, Global Applications User Experience, Oracle Corporation. On Twitter: @ultan

See my other Oracle blog about product globalization too: Not Lost in Translation

Interests: User experience (UX), user centered design, design patterns, tailoring, BYOD, dev relations, language quality, mobile apps, Oracle FMW and ADF, and a lot more.

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