Sunday Nov 15, 2015

Women in Tech: Where Are They?

Watching thousands of techies storm the floors and swarm the 20+ summits at Web Summit 2015 was an extraordinary experience. As I really looked at the people walking around, though, I couldn’t help thinking, “Where are the women?” Of course I saw women, but I saw far fewer women than men.

Web Summit Centre Stage

Web Summit Centre Stage

Not relying on my own unofficial observations, I noted a V3 article that not only validated my observations with reflections that mimicked mine but went on to share this data point from Capgemini: “only 18 percent of speakers at Web Summit 2015 were women.”

To be fair, though, throughout the Web Summit, significant awareness was placed on the ever troubling lack of women in professional roles in tech. Hearing different speakers and panelists comment on the state of Women In Technology (WIT) got me wondering: Who exactly are WIT? And why wouldn’t more women pitch up “at the best technology conference on the planet” (Forbes)?

Unofficially I asked somewhere around 50 +/- people from both inside and outside of the software industry to tell me who they think WIT are. I found it interesting that the majority of those who answered mentioned engineering, scientific, and developer job titles or gave me the name of a woman they know who holds a role with a similar job title.

These responses got me thinking about the shape of WIT—who’s in, who’s out. Without a doubt, those women who hold roles with technical job titles are in. But what about those women who have dedicated their entire careers to the tech industry but don’t hold job titles that include the word engineer or developer—women, for example, who design (but don’t build) software or those who write about how to extend or customize software?

Shouldn’t women who’ve built careers in technology and who’ve spent years deep-dive learning about specific industries, domains, software, platforms in order to write content that enables users, as well as those who who’ve spent years designing user experiences as well as developing conceptual object and data models, or those who occasionally code—but never held a job title that includes engineer or developer—count, too?

Microsoft’s Peggy Johnson, EVP, Business Development: Partner, thrive or die session

Microsoft’s Peggy Johnson, EVP, Business Development: Partner, thrive or die session

During my three days at the Web Summit, I attended as many sessions as I could in which women were speakers or panelists. I was hoping to learn from them—learn more about the “who counts” aspect of WIT, as well as hear creative proposals or solutions that address the gender imbalance in the tech world. While today’s grassroots efforts, such as Black Girls Code and CoderDojo, are fantastic, we need to proactively create a next generation of tech women, or we will simply continue having this same conversation.

Sinead Murphy’s “commitment to change” gave me hope that the momentum towards such change is increasing: “As part of an initiative we’re [Web Summit] running to even the gender ratio at our events, we’re giving 10,000 complimentary tickets to our events to women in the tech industry across the world – we hope that it will, in some small way, contribute to solving the problem." The Web Summit will invite “10,000 female entrepreneurs as [Web Summit] guests in 2016.” The Women In Tech Summit will be held in Lisbon next year.

An equally remarkable commitment was announced at Oracle OpenWorld 2015. Oracle CEO Safra Catz announced Oracle’s plan to build a new public school,, saying, “I’ve realised it’s absolutely critical that big companies like ours […] to do something because when you look at the statistics, you realise there are simply not enough women in the pipeline in the math and science education areas.” For more about this new high school, read the diginomica article, Oracle OpenWorld 2015 - Safra Catz on the tech industry's female talent pipeline problem.”

Clearly these are excellent examples of forward movement. But we—ALL women who work in tech, as well as our male colleagues—have the opportunity to step up and do more. The challenge of drawing more women into all types of tech roles—no matter the job title—belongs to each and every one of us. What will you do?

Learn more about Oracle’s WIT in these inspiring stories. And be sure to check out the Oracle Women in Technology Program.

Thursday Aug 06, 2015

Visitas estudiantiles a Oracle MDC

Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles), User Experience Developer, nos cuenta de la reciente visita del Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Zamora para conocer el Centro de desarrollo de Oracle en México (MDC), como parte de un programa de Oracle MDC para estudiantes de TI.

Sarahi and Karina at the Event in MDC

Sarahi con Karina Nava (Database developer) explican algunas de las áreas donde los estudiantes de TI pueden desarrollar su carrera en Oracle

Cada semestre en Oracle Mexico Development Center (A.K.A. MDC) le damos la bienvenida a cientos de estudiantes del área de Telecomunicaciones e Informática como una oportunidad de conocer el centro de desarrollo y las distintas áreas en las que Oracle es líder en el mercado.

Students learn about the important role of Oracle MDC and IT

Estudiantes aprenden acerca del importante rol de Oracle MDC en el desarrollo de nuevas tecnologías y el trabajo que ahí se hace.

Estudiantes de diferentes universidades de todo el país han llegado para conocer más sobre Oracle y cómo estamos revolucionando no sólo nuestro país sino el mundo con las nuevas tecnologías de información. Junto con otros compañeros, yo soy parte del equipo que recibe a estos estudiantes y les damos una charla corta y divertida sobre qué es Oracle, cómo está impactando las tecnologías de manera global, porqué México para un centro de desarrollo, qué hacemos aquí, cómo es nuestro ambiente de trabajo y lo increíble que es trabajar para una empresa de nivel y reconocimiento internacional.

Students gather on the balcony at MDC for a group photograph

Los estudiantes de las distintas universidades toman un pequeño recorrido por las instalaciones de Oracle MDC. Aquí, los estudiantes en uno de los balcones.

Te gusta la idea de visitarnos y eres estudiante o maestro del ramo de Tecnologías de Información? Ponte en contacto con Laura Ramos o para conocer los detalles y programar una visita.

Flying Monkeys! Fun at work with UX. What's on your desk?

Oracle Applications User Experience mezclando la diversión y el trabajo en la nube!

Puedes leer más acerca de Oracle MDC en nuestra página de Facebook y conocer más acerca del equipo Oracle Applications User Experience en el website de Usable Apps.

Saturday Apr 26, 2014

Conferencia OWL: Día Internacional de la Mujer

Our How to Get Started in a Career in Tech piece was well received worldwide. As a follow-up piece, I asked Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles) to share more about an Oracle Women’s Leadership (OWL) event held in Mexico to inspire more women to explore and excel in different roles in the information technology field.

Sarahi writes:

El pasado 10 de Marzo, Día Internacional de la Mujer se llevó a cabo un evento para todas las mujeres de Oracle por parte de Oracle Women Leadership (OWL).

La visión de la fundación OWL es crecer y llegar a las futuras generaciones, así como desarrollar mujeres líderes y tener un mayor alcance a la comunidad de mujeres en el ramo de TI.

Leticia Moguel Paz, directora de vantas de Mary Kay

Figura 1. Leticia Moguel Paz, directora de ventas Mary Kay

Leticia Moguel Paz, directora de ventas de Mary Kay, nos dio una conferencia muy amena a todas las mujeres Oracle en la que nos retó a: creer en nosotras mismas, tener iniciativa, prepararnos, practicar para ser mejores, perseverar, nunca dejar de aprender, ser mujeres de carácter, rodearnos de personas positivas, y tomar nuevas responsabilidades que nos impulsen a crecer.

“Lo importante no es lo que te sucede sino como reaccionas a lo que te sucede.” Estas fueron las palabras de Lety al hablar acerca de la toma de decisiones. En cuanto a ser mujeres exitosas, Lety dijo “Tenemos éxito cuando nos vencemos a nosotros mismos.”

Todas las mujeres del MDC Oracle en el evento

Figura 2. Todas las mujeres del MDC Oracle en el evento 

Fue un excelente desayuno y sin duda una excelente conferencia que a mí me dejó con muchos retos. Si quieres saber más acerca de OWL, puedes leer aquí una pequeña reseña de sus comienzos.

[English Translation]

Thursday Mar 20, 2014

Oracle Developer Diversity Realized
How to Get Started in a Career in Tech

Oracle takes very seriously the pursuit of creating a diverse group of people who work in technology. We have the Oracle Women’s Leadership (OWL) and Women in Technology programs, for example. Externally, the Oracle user group community has Women in IT (WIT) initiatives, such as the ones run by RMOUG and UKOUG.

I’m always on the look out for smart people, of all types, ages, cultures, and experiences, who are shining examples of how a diversity of people working together in tech means we all win.

Jeff Caldwell and Sarahi Mirelese

Oracle is committed to diversity. Oracle Product Management VP Jeff Caldwell with Sarahi Mireles at a Building Great-Looking Usable Apps workshop in Mexico City, D.F.

After reading a great online conversation about women in tech, I checked out Rails Girls, Black Girls Code, and Girls Who Code. I wanted to know how young women start to pursue a career in tech. So I chatted with Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles) in the UX team who shared her experiences.

Sarahi is a front-end developer based in the Mexico Development Center in Guadalajara, working on the Usable Apps website. Sarahi is a key part of communicating our UX messages and enablement to Oracle ADF developers, partners, and customers, worldwide.

Sarahi knows about the importance of role models as examples and getting people talking together about diversity. "Talking about my work and interest in tech helps change the way coworkers and others see women in tech and clears up misconceptions. The conversation encourages other women to become interested in IT, too."

What does Sarahi recommend to others like her who are interested in technology?

"Technology is awesome! It lets you be creative, it’s a great challenge for the mind, and it encourages you to explore new areas. I would recommend a tech path that takes you into the visual and practical areas first, like animations and photo and video editing. Checking out a simple course on robotics can be incredible fun, too. Then, if you think you’ve got a good feel for tech and what you can do with it, develop that interest with programming, math, and science study options in school."

What kinds of interests do you need to have to work in tech?

"There are lots of other skills that lead to jobs in tech: design, arts, music, video, photography, as well as web development and mobile app development. If you’re into solving problems or have crazy thoughts about apps for your phone that will be useful for your daily tasks, well there’s an opportunity to turn those ideas into a great career in technology, too. What you need is already in your head."

So what got Sarahi started on the path to her career in tech?

"I got interested in tech when I was in elementary school, trying to record songs in Windows ‘95 with a friend. I then discovered web design through Myspace; it came with lots of possibilities for personalizing the way your pages looked by using HTML and CSS. By the time I was ready for high school, I knew I was heading for the tech world, so I chose a science and math-focused school."

What tech impresses and inspires Sarahi?

"I'm very impressed by apps I can use everyday to help me to save time or get something done quickly. Mobile apps like Waze, for example, let me get somewhere faster, whether I'm here in Guadalajara or in San Francisco."

Ultan O'Broin and Sarahi Mirelese

Sarahi is interested in wearable tech. Seen here with Ultan O’Broin (@ultan) getting ready for a wearables design jam.

"I like apps like Dollarbird to track monthly expenses, WhatsApp to stay connected, and Foursquare to find a place to hang out–it works just great in Mexico. I'm interested how wearable tech makes life easier too, such as how Google Glass translates text automatically by looking at it or takes pictures or videos of what’s right in front of you."

"For exercising, a combination of MapMyRide and PowerTap is great for cycling. I like VocalizeU because I can use my iPhone to warm up my vocal cords for singing class. And then I can use recipe apps like Epicurious to discover how to make tasty stuff from what I have left in the fridge."

Thanks Sarahi! What an inspiration to others! You’ve given others some great ideas for getting started on the path to a career in tech. What a a great example of diversity in action in the technology industry.

Watch out for more information about WIT and OWL, and catch up with Sarahi and the rest of the UX team at outreach events by following @usableapps on Twitter and checking in regularly on the Usable Apps blogs and website.


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