Monday Jun 08, 2015

Oracle Partners ♥ APIs for PaaS and IoT User Experience

Platform as a Service (PaaS) and the Internet of Things (IoT) are two ginormous business propositions for Oracle partners. But together they’re a new game-changer of seemingly endless possibilities.

But how do PaaS and IoT work together? Is there a user experience (UX) dimension? And, what should Oracle Applications Cloud partners be thinking about for SaaS?

The IoT train is arriving at your platform now. Be on it.

The IoT train is arriving at your platform. Prepare to board.

PaaS and IoT

The PaaS business proposition might be summarized as "Bring Your Code" to a very productive way to innovate and build custom app and integrations. IoT relies on ubiquitous connectivity across devices of all sorts, with the “things” exchanging bits of data along the way.

Platform as a Service: 5 Ideas - Oracle Profit Magazine

Platform as a Service offers awesome ideas for rapidly innovating, developing, and deploying scalable applications.

I discussed PaaS and IoT with Mark Vilrokx (@mvilrokx), our all-things PaaS UX architect from the AppsLab (@theappslab) crew, and how we might put a business shape around the concept for partners.

"These 'things' don’t need UIs. For PaaS, all they need is a web API", says Mark. “Developers need to think about how IoT devices talk to SaaS applications using APIs and about what kind of PaaS infrastructure is needed to support building these kind of solutions."

"Oracle is up there, with an IoT platform to simplify building IoT solutions. Developers now need now to adopt an approach of not writing UIs, but writing UI services: APIs are part of the Cloud UX toolkit."

IoT in the Enterprise: Connecting the Data

To illustrate what all this might mean for customer solutions, let's assume we have a use case to track items across a supply chain using the cloud.

IoT is all about the data. Using IoT we can gather the data unobtrusively and in a deeply contextual way using devices across the IoT spectrum: beacons, proximity sensors, wearable tech of all sorts, drones, and so on. We can detect where the item is in the supply chain, when it’s expected at its destination, who will receive it, when it arrives, and so on. The item’s digital signature in the Internet of Things becomes data in the cloud.

There are lots of other rich possibilities for PaaS and IoT. Check out this Forbes OracleVoice article, for example.

PaaS for SaaS and IoT

PaaS with SaaS is also a perfect combination to rapidly innovate and keep pace in a fast-moving, competitive space of cloud applications solutions.

SaaS is not done in a vacuum in the enterprise world of integrations, and is an innovation accelerator in its own right, but with PaaS and IoT added into the technology mix, we have an alignment of technology stars that are a solution provider’s dream.

We can use APIs to integrate IoT data in our supply chain example, but we can also use PaaS to build a bespoke app with a dashboard UI for an inventory administrator to correct any outliers or integrate our supply chain with a freight company’s system. For SaaS, we can now also integrate the data with, say, Oracle ERP Cloud, using the Oracle Java Cloud Service SaaS Extension (JCS-SX).

And guess what? Our UX enablement has already helped partners build pure PaaS and PaaS4SaaS solutions, all using the same Oracle ADF-based Rapid Development Kit!

APIs as UX Design

Where does this leave UX? UX takes on increased power as a key differentiator for partners in the PaaS, SaaS, and IoT space. The UX mix of science and empathy makes the complications of all that technology and the machinations of enterprise business processes fade away for users in a delightful way and deliver ROI for customer decision makers.

Developers: Learn to heart APIs

Developers: Pivot and learn to ♥ APIs. At the heart of the Cloud UX toolkit to win business.

So, the user experience for a task flow build using API connectivity must still be designed to be compelling and to provide value. And, when UIs are required, they must still be designed in an optimal way, reflecting the UX mobility strategy, even if that means making the UI invisible to users.

For example, going back to our use case, we would glance at a notification on a smartwatch letting us know that our item has entered the supply chain or that it’s been received. The data comes from contextual sensors and is communicated in a convenient, micro-transactional way on our wrists.

Oracle Partner UX Enablement

Web APIs are the new Cloud UX for connecting data and devices. That APIs are UX design is not really a new idea, but what is emerging now are new business opportunities for partners who exploring are PaaS, SaaS, and IoT innovation.

Be sure of one thing: The Oracle Applications User Experience team takes a strategic view of Cloud UX enablement for partners. Whether it is PaaS, SaaS, or IoT, our enablement is there to help you take your business to a higher level.

For partners who say "Bring It On", you know where to find us and what our enablement requirements are

Wednesday May 27, 2015

Deep-Diving Oracle UX PaaS4SaaS Partner Enablement in Asia

Just back from our fantastic Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) communications outreach events in Asia. The VoX blog has great recaps of the highlights and takeaways from two tremendous events in Singapore and Beijing.

Oracle Applications User Experience Outreach in Beijing and Singapore: Chinese visa shown

Oracle Applications Cloud user experience in Asia: Enabling a local user experience. Empowering global capabilities.

The second day in each location comprised of a deep-dive workshop about the Oracle Applications Cloud user experience extensibility and PaaS4SaaS capabilities. Together, they’re a powerful competitive differentiator that empowers customers and partners to really make that cloud their own.

It’s worth calling out the comments of co-worker Greg Nerpouni (@gnerpouni) again. Greg really nails the excitement and enthusiasm for what we shared when he says:

"The extensibility and PaaS4SaaS stations were mobbed by our Chinese and Korean partners, especially when they realized the combined power of our extensibility and PaaS4SaaS capabilities. At the extensibility station, they saw tangible ways to increase end user participation and overall success of their cloud rollout for our mutual customers. And at the PaaS4SaaS station, they saw immediate value in being able to leverage the UX rapid development kit to emulate Oracle’s user experience in their own PaaS implementations - and seamlessly integrate their PaaS applications into Oracle Cloud Applications."

Greg Nerpouni deep-dives Oracle Applications Cloud Extensibility in Singapore

Greg stylin' the Cloud UX extensibility deep-dive action in Singapore. (Singapore image via Shy Meei Siow [@shymeeisiow])

Now, the “Why Should I Care?” business propositions for the OAUX PaaS4SaaS Oracle Partner enablement and the requirements for same are clear (read them again). If you've seen our roadshow you'll know that part of my PaaS4Saas story includes “the wisdom of the cloud crowd”.

That wisdom is PaaS and SaaS insight and knowledge from Oracle Partner leaders such as Debra Lilley (@debralilley) of Certus Solutions, who have proven the business proposition, and from cloud influencers and shapers such as Mark Hurd (@markvhurd) and Steve Miranda (@stevenrmiranda).

The latest addition to the celestial book of wisdom comes from Oracle CIO, Mark Sunday. Mark, explaining that enterprise applications aren't a siloed concept, underpins the need for partners to integrate fast and how SaaS with PaaS is a must-have differentiator when he declares, in his own inimitable way (using HCM by way of example):

“Absolutely without a doubt, the integration of a suite always wins... I think it’s more important than any given function. If you think HCM stands alone as a silo inside of an enterprise, you’re nuts.”

If you're a partner, therefore I think you’d be somewhat remiss not to take up on opportunities for enablement to make PaaS4SaaS happen for you too!

Ultan O'Broin Storytelling the Selling the UX Message in Beijing

Storytelling that UX. Winning more business with our Cloud enablement. (Beijing image via Shy Meei Siow)

So, if you’re a partner in the Asia region (or elsewhere for that matter) that wants to go places, start that enablement conversation by following @usableapps on Twitter or reach out to us through your Oracle Alliances and Channels or Oracle PartnerNetwork contacts.

Ultan in action in Beijing

Come on Beijing, you know you want that enablement! (Beijing image via Shy Meei Siow)

Oh, did I mention I did some running in Beijing, by the way of UX research into smartwatches?

Thursday Apr 30, 2015

Partners, Don’t PaaS On an Opportunity to Grow Your Oracle Applications Cloud Business

I attended the Oracle HCM Cloud Partner Enablement Summit near Milan, Italy to explain the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) enablement strategy of using Oracle Platform as a Service (PaaS) to extend the Oracle Applications Cloud. We enable partners to offer their customers even more: a great user experience across the Software as a Service (SaaS) applications portfolio. We call this PaaS4SaaS.

The central part of my charter is to drive an OAUX PaaS4SaaS strategy that resonates with the business needs of the Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN) and our own sales enablement worldwide, but with the EMEA region as focus.

We have a great team that delivers Oracle PaaS and SaaS enablement and direct deal support, scaling our outreach message and running events so that the proven resources to win more business get into the hands of our partners and our sales teams.

Rapid Development Kit available for PaaS4SaaS

The OAUX team PaaS4SaaS enablement is based on a rapid development kit (RDK) strategy of simple development, design, and business materials. After a few hours, partners walk away from one of our events with Cloud solutions they can sell to customers.

Let me explain more broadly why our PaaS4SaaS approach is a partner differentiator and a competitive must-have, and about how you can be in on the action!

RDK simplified UI deployed to Oracle Java Cloud Service - SaaS Extension live!

During the event in Italy, I deployed live a tablet-first Oracle Applications Cloud simplified UI from the RDK to the Oracle Java Cloud Service - SaaS Extension (JCS-SX), demonstrating that our apps are not only simple to use, but easy to build, and therefore easy for partners to sell.

Make no mistake; PaaS4SaaS is the partner differentiator when it comes to competing in the cloud. Our enablement means partners can:  

  • Build Oracle Applications Cloud simplified UIs productively using Oracle PaaS and SaaS.
  • Offer customization and integration confidence to customers in the cloud: they’ll get the same great user experience that Oracle delivers out of the box.
  • Identify new reusable business opportunities in the cloud and win more deals.
  • Accelerate innovation and SaaS adoption and increase the range of value-add PaaS solutions offered to customers.
  • Sharpen sales and consulting strategies using the user experience message, and take your position in the partner world to a new level.

But don’t just take it from me, check out the wisdom of the cloud, and what our partners, the press, and Oracle’s leadership team have to say about PaaS and SaaS:  

Here are the partner requirements to start that conversation with you about OAUX enablement: 

  • Do you have use cases for PaaS and the Oracle Applications Cloud? 
  • Do you want user experience (UX) as the partner differentiator? 
  • Are you an Oracle Applications Cloud (ERP, HCM, Sales) partner who wants to lead and influence
  • Do you have Oracle ADF, Oracle Fusion Middleware, SOA, Cloud or other development skills in-house or by way of an alliance? 
  • Are you willing to participate jointly in Oracle outreach and communications about your enablement and the outcome? 

So, if you want what other partners in EMEA and the U.S. have already experienced, and you tick all the requirements boxes, get in touch with me.

For more information on our PaaS4SaaS enablement, check out these links:  

Monday Apr 27, 2015

Interested in Lift-Off for Your Cloud Business?

Julian Orr (@Orr_UX), Senior Usability Engineer in the Oracle Applications User Experience Communications and Outreach team reflects on the OAUG Collaborate 15 conference.

Much like the very real sand cloud that enveloped Las Vegas during this year’s OAUG Collaborate 15, the conference itself is getting drawn deeper into the Oracle Cloud, as more Oracle applications lift off and soar towards the Oracle Applications Cloud user experience and look and feel.

I co-presented three sessions with Oracle Cloud Applications partners at the conference. All three sessions focused on how to extend and complement the functionality of the Oracle Applications Cloud using a combination of PaaS for SaaS (or PaaS4SaaS as we call it). Common themes included:

  • PaaS is an agile, effective means used to extend SaaS cloud applications as proven by our partners.
  • Oracle PaaS is not just used to extend SaaS functionality, but it’s also used to extend the user experience benefits of the Oracle Applications Cloud simplified UI to your users.
  • Applying best practices helps users reap the many benefits of the simplified user experience.

In the Oracle Fusion Middleware for the Cloud panel session, Sandeep Banerjie, Senior Director, Oracle Product Management, did a great job of setting the table with comprehensive coverage about Oracle Cloud current and future offerings.

Julian Orr, and Basheer Khan at the Oracle Fusion Middleware for the Cloud panel

(L-R) Sandeep Banerjie, Julian Orr, and Basheer Khan at the Oracle Fusion Middleware for the Cloud panel [Photo by Natasha K. Rogers (@NatashaKotovsky)]

I used my time to describe how the Oracle Applications User Experience team worked with Basheer Khan, (@bkhan) CEO of Knex Technology and OAUX Speaker, and its customers in an intensive onsite design workshop to rapidly develop a simplified approach for accurately assigning a constantly changing cadre of new hires to project resources to enable accurate management and accounting. Basheer followed my coverage of the simplified design process with a live demo the PaaS application that we co-designed.

The panel was well received, with a few nods for involvement of end users in the design process and demonstrated success in PaaS rapid development. The majority of the questions we addressed were focused on cloud security features.

Debra Lilley extols the user experience value of using PaaS for SaaS solutions.

Debra Lilley extols the Oracle Partner business value of using PaaS for SaaS solutions.

In the two sessions about using Oracle PaaS to Extend Oracle Cloud Applications, I joined Debra Lilley (@debralilley), Vice President of Cloud Services at Certus Solutions, Oracle ACE Director, and OAUX Speaker; and Ian Carline, Executive Vice President - Product Development at Certus Solutions, to discuss the design workshop we conducted with Certus to use PaaS to extend the Oracle HCM Cloud cloud functionality.

Debra and Ian did powerful jobs of stressing the absolute need and value of having a consistent user experience across PaaS and SaaS applications. My part of the presentation emphasized how to achieve a simplified user experience by focusing on these three things:

  • Design work: Before coding begins, employ a simplified design process that involves use-case review with end users and user advocates, sketching, and wireframing.

Following the presentation, much of the discussion centered on how to determine which use cases would make prime candidates for PaaS4SaaS projects.

As more partners and customers start designing and building PaaS solutions for the Oracle Applications Cloud SaaS offerings, I expect we will see that questions will begin to focus more and more on user experience. If it is not already, it will become, clear that to differentiate and win business in the cloud partners building and customizing enterprise apps need to compete on user experience as well as functionality. 

Interested in lifting off your business?

Sunday Apr 19, 2015

Oracle HCM Cloud and the iGeneration: Not Your Parents’ Applications

Harder Than You Think” is one awesome rap anthem by Public Enemy (I’ve always suspected Flavor Flav was a wearable technology innovator with that clock).

There’s a particular line in the song that resonates soundly with the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) capacity for empathy: to "bear witness". Witness to real people doing real tasks in real places. I used the line to open my session on Future User Experience (UX) at the Oracle HCM Day 2015 at Oracle Nederland in Utrecht.

Public Enemy: Harder Than You Think (Click to play)

Public Enemy: Harder Than You Think 

UX is harder than you think too, but our job is to make things easy for Oracle Applications Cloud users by simplifying things; hiding the complexity of technology and making convoluted business processes fade away.

The theme of HCM Day was the iGeneration: those technology-versed young adults about to enter the workforce with expectations and attitudes about job permanence and how talent is recruited and managed that have shattered the employment model status quo. So, to explain the OAUX fit with their world, I jumped right into Oracle co-CEO Mark Hurd’s “Welcome to Nobody Cares” HCM World keynote, research and insights into younger generations' use of technology, how work apps are more than a pretty face; and then in to Oracle HCM Cloud, stealing a line from U2 about everything you know (about enterprise software) being wrong, along the way.

The Oracle Applications Cloud UX message for the iGeneration can be summed up as:

  1. We care. Winning in HCM is strategic for Oracle.
  2. This is not your parent’s software (Not that they wanted crapplications, either).
  3. Tech-savvy people need tech-savvy workplaces.
  4. User experience is a competitive must-have.
  5. The cloud has changed everything. Vendor and partner complacency about how people and business use software is dead. 
  6. Making things "Apple Easy" (h/t Richard Twelvetrees [@rg12t]) is no longer merely a dream for enterprise applications users thanks to simplicity and a design philosophy of Glance, Scan, Commit.
Tech-savvy people need tech-savvy workplaces: UX Apple Easy

The Message 

To keep the performance real I offered a glimpse of what UX might come the iGeneration's way too. I shared some innovative concepts from the OAUX AppsLab team (@theappslab), our mobile Cloud apps, and the Oracle HCM Cloud, Oracle Sales Cloud and Oracle ERP Cloud designs for the forthcoming Apple Watch. I then showed live proof-of-concept demos of a glanceable UI for time entry microtransactions (using a Motorola Moto 360 smartwatch and location detection for mega convenience) and of Oracle Taleo interview evaluations and phone screener text (SMS) messaging built using Oracle partner Twilio's cloud API.

Glance UI on Smartwatch

Glance UI time entry on Motorola Moto 360

Oracle Taleo Texting (SMS)

Oracle Taleo Texting (SMS)

HCM Day was a great event, with over 130 attendees (including some 90 customers). It was a cool, fun, fast-paced learning event and an opportunity to build more relationships across the Benelux area. I was really wowed by the heads-up displays and 3D printing by main partner Deloitte too!

Glance UX 3D Print by Deloitte

3D Print by Deloitte 

Special thanks to Conny Groen in 't Woud (Marketing Manager Applications, HCM Benelux) and Henry Barenholz (Senior Director, HCM Leader Benelux and Nordics) for asking me to share our insight and innovation at a brilliantly organized and orchestrated happening.

You can see more of the cool stuff I showed off at HCM Day in the free Oracle Applications Cloud User Experience Trends and Strategy eBook.

Remember, it’s not how you swipe or click. It’s how you work. Tell your parents.

The iGeneration already knows.

A Werken.FM podcast of the day is now available (in Dutch). 

Saturday Mar 28, 2015

A Glance at Smartwatches in the Enterprise: A Moment in Time Experience

Ultan O’Broin (@usableapps) talks to Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) Vice President Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley) about designing apps for that smartwatch, and every other smartwatch, too. This is a three-part series of blog posts. Read part two.

Nobody wants their device to disrupt them from what they are doing or to have to move to another one to continue working. Keeping users in the moment of their tasks—independent of the devices they’re using—is central to any great user experience.

The ability to apply our Oracle Applications Cloud design philosophy to the smartwatch demonstrates an ideal realization of the “glance” method, keeping users in that moment: Making the complex simple, flexible, intuitive, and most of all, convenient. OAUX recognizes the need for smartwatch wearers to experience that “right here, right now” feeling, the one in which you have just what you need, just when you need it.

The wearable technology space is currently focused on smartwatches. We’re excited by Apple’s announcement about their smartwatch, and we’re even more thrilled to now show you our proof of concept glance designs for the Oracle Applications Cloud on the Apple Watch. We want to hear your reaction! 

Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud on Apple Watch

Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud on Apple Watch


Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud on Apple Watch

Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud on Apple Watch

Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud on Apple Watch

Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud on Apple Watch

Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud for Apple Watch proof of concept designs

For the smartwatch specifically, VP Jeremy Ashley explained how our glance approach applies to smartwatch wearers, regardless of their choice of device:

“The most common wearable user interaction is to glance at something. The watch works as the wearer’s mini dialog box to the cloud, making microtransactions convenient on the wrist, and presenting the right information to the wearer at the right time. How quickly and easily someone can do something actually useful is the key activity."

Glance brings cloud interaction to wearers in a personal way, requesting and not demanding attention, while eliminating a need to switch to other devices to “dig in,” or to even have to pull a smartphone out of the pocket to respond.

“To continue the journey to completing a task using glance is as simple and natural as telling the time on your wrist”, says Jeremy.

Being able to glance down at your wrist at a stylish smartwatch experience—one that provides super-handy ways to engage with gems of information— enhances working in the cloud in powerful and productive ways, whether you’re a sales rep walking from your car to an opportunity engagement confidently glancing at the latest competitive news, or a field technician swiping across a watchface to securely record time on a remote job.

Glancing at a UI is the optimal wearable experience for the OAUX mobility strategy, where the cloud, not the device, is our platform. This means you can see our device-agnostic glance design at work not only on an Apple Watch, but on Android Wear, Pebble, and other devices, too.

Glance on Android Wear Samsung Gear Live and Pebble

Glance for Oracle Applications Cloud proof of concept apps on Android Wear Samsung Gear Live and Pebble

Designing a Glanceable Platform

The path to our glance designs began with OAUX research into every kind of smartwatch we could get on our wrists so that we could study their possibilities, experience how they felt, how they looked, and how they complemented everyday work and life activities. Then we combined ideas and experiences with Oracle Cloud technology to deliver a simplified design strategy that we can apply across devices. As a result, our UI designs are consistent and familiar to users as they work flexibly in the cloud, regardless of their device, type of operating system, or form factor.

This is not about designing for any one specific smartwatch. It’s a platform-agnostic approach to wearable technology that enables Oracle customers to get that awesome glanceable, cloud-enabled experience on their wearable of choice.

Why Smartwatches?

Smartwatches such as the Apple Watch, Pebble, and Android Wear devices have resonated strongly with innovators and consumers of wearable technology. The smartwatch succeeds because we’re already familiar and comfortable with using wristwatches, and they’re practical and easy to use.

From first relying on the sun to tell the time, to looking up at town hall clocks, to taking out pocket watches, and then being able to glance at our wrists to tell the time, we’ve seen an evolution in glanceable technology analogous to the miniaturization of computing from large mainframes to personal, mobile devices for consumers.

Just like enterprise apps, watches have already been designed for many specializations and roles, be they military, sport, medical, fashion, and so on. So the evolution of the smartwatch into an accepted workplace application is built on a firm foundation.

More Information

Again, OAUX is there, on trend, ready and offering a solution grounded in innovation and design expertise, one that responds to how we work today in the cloud.

In future articles, we’ll explore more examples that showcase how we’re applying the glance approach to wearable technology, and we’ll look at design considerations in more detail. You can read more about our Oracle Applications Cloud design philosophy and other trends and innovations that influence our thinking in our free eBook.

Check the Usable Apps website for events where you can experience our smartwatch and other innovations for real, read our Storify feature on wearable technology, and see our YouTube videos about our UX design philosophy and strategy.

We'll follow up with Jeremy in a future blog post about his impressions of the Apple Watch after he's used it for a while. 

More Apple Watch glance designs are on Instagram

Friday Mar 27, 2015

Oracle FMW Partner Community Forum 2015: The Oracle Applications Cloud UX Rapid Development Kit Goes to Hungary!

Vlad Babu (@vladbabu), Oracle Applications Cloud Pre-Sales UX Champ, files a report about his Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) while attending the recent Oracle Fusion Middleware Partner Community Forum 2015 in Budapest, Hungary.

Over 200 Oracle Partners from the Oracle Fusion Middleware (FMW) area stepped away from their projects in early March 2015 to take part in a groundbreaking event in Budapest, Hungary: the Oracle Fusion Middleware Partner Community Forum 2015. For some time, this two-day event had been just a glimmer in the eye of Jürgen Kress (@soacommunity),  Senior Manager SOA/FMW Partner Programs EMEA. However, with the unprecedented success of the partner programs and community growth in recent years, he really felt compelled to make this event  happen. And he did!

Andrew Sutherland, Senior Vice President Business Development - Technology License & Systems EMEA, and Amit Zavery (@azavery), Senior Vice President, Integration Products, were the keynote speakers. They inspired the audience when they spoke about Digital Disruption and how Oracle is soaring to success with Integration Cloud Services offerings, such as Oracle Cloud Platform (Platform as a Service [PaaS]).

Tweet from Debra Lilley

Tweet from Debra Lilley: Pervasiveness of UX to Cloud success

The user experience (UX) presence at the event struck a chord with Debra Lilley (@debralilley), (Vice President of Certus Cloud Services), who remarked on how important the all-encompassing Oracle Applications User Experience Simplified User Experience Rapid Development Kit (RDK) is for enabling great partner development for the cloud experience. Yes, integration and PaaS4SaaS are key partner differentiators going forward!

PTS Code Accelerator Kit and Oracle Applications UX design patterns eBook

Tweet from Vlad Babu: PTS Code Accelerator Kit and Oracle Applications UX design patterns eBook 

So, how can partners truly leverage their investment in Oracle Fusion Middleware? Use the RDK. Oracle Partners were really excited by and empowered when they used the RDK for designing and coding a simplified UI for the Oracle Applications Cloud. The RDK contains all the information you’ll need before you even start coding, such as easy-to-use RDK wireframing stencils. The YouTube guidance offers great productivity features when creating new extensions in PaaS or developing from scratch a brand new, custom application using Oracle ADF technology.

Tweet from Debra Lilley

Tweet from Debra Lilley: Integration is key to SaaS. 

For example, Certus Solutions leveraged the RDK Simplified User Experience Design Patterns eBook that covers simplified UI design patterns and the ADF-based code templates in the RDK to develop a new extension for the Oracle HCM Cloud. The result? Certus Solutions received the FMW Community Cloud Award for outstanding work in validating PaaS4SaaS with the Usable Apps team!

Tweet from Debra Lilley announcing that Certus Solutions received the FMW Community Cloud Award

Tweet from Debra Lilley: Announcing that Certus Solutions received the FMW Community Cloud Award  

Experiencing the motivation and innovation from successful partners, this event proved to be a unique and rewarding chance to interact with key Oracle Partners. This event was truly a fantastic two-day event to remember. Here’s to the next opportunity to wear the OAUX colors with pride!

Tweet from Debra Lilley

Tweet from Debra Lilley: Simplicity, Extensibility, Mobile worn with pride. 

For more information, I encourage you to visit the Usable Apps website where you’ll find lots of essential information about designing and building new simplified UIs for the Oracle Applications Cloud.

Your reward is waiting.

Friday Feb 20, 2015

Oracle Design Jam takes a look at the Future of Information

By Sarahi Mireles and Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience Communications and Outreach

From Kathy...

In keeping with a new emphasis and investment from Oracle on exploring emerging technology for ways to encourage the evolution of the Oracle user experience, the UX Innovation Events (@InnovateOracle) team held a design jam for Oracle employees in early February.

Since embracing their charter in Fall 2014, the team -- a branch of the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team -- has organized and held a rapid succession of design jams. The design jam focused on the future of information design.

Verbal Karate Chop: The Team. (L-R) Tony Orciuoli, Sarahi Mireles, Sasha Boyko, Rob Hernandez (Kathy Miedema not pictured)

Verbal Karate Chop, the team: (L-R) Tony Orciuoli, Sarahi Mireles, Sasha Boyko, Rob Hernandez, and Kathy Miedema (not pictured) 

It’s worth pointing out how exciting it is to be part of an organization that encourages a free flow of thinking and creativity by supporting events like these. Our team met a few times before the event to kick-start our brainstorming, and then took off an entire day to participate in this event.

We were well-supported during the event too – we had room to collaborate, materials to help us develop ideas, mentors to help guide us, food to keep us fueled.

Our team, Verbal Karate Chop, designed a product that builds on the technology behind Oracle Voice, pulling in information around a particular keyword or phrase to create meetings, help prepare for meetings, and even start a meeting hands-free if you happen to be driving in your car, for example.

Sarahi can better describe what it’s like to participate as a developer and build an idea like this on a tight deadline. Before turning it over to her, I’m happy to announce that our idea won both the People’s Choice award and the Best Use of Audio/Video award. This was my first time participating in such an event – what a thrill it was!

Innovate and diversify. Getting the message out: Kathy Miedema and Sarahi Mireles

Innovate and diversify. Getting the message out: Kathy Miedema and Sarahi Mireles

... and from Sarahi

As a developer, I find it really fun going to a design jam. The best part after the brain-storming is starting to build your prototype. This can be something really simple or something quite complex, and that actually depends on the time you have and how fast are you able to play with whatever tool you are using.

Time was actually the key factor for this design jam. Having only a couple of hours to build your entire idea is what really makes your adrenaline surge.

We started putting together all our ideas, and then we began to draw the general design of the whole idea (I’m glad we had two designers on our team!), and after that, we built it.

From a non-designer point of view, I have to say that we designed some cool UIs after a couple of hours of pushing our brains to the maximum. And it was awesome to build out those ideas.

If you have the opportunity to join a design jam, do it! It’s also the best way to learn from other developers and non-developers, and to explore all kinds of crazy ideas for innovation in the enterprise.

Verbal Karate Chop. The User Experience: People’s Choice and the Best Use of Audio/Video awards

Verbal Karate Chop, the user experience: People’s Choice and Best Use of Audio/Video awards

Explore more 

Find out more about this Oracle Applications User Experience design jam and about other events on the UX Innovation Events blog, and follow event happenings on Twitter.

The overall results of the design jam are here.

To discover more about the emerging technology and trends that drive the Oracle Applications User Experience strategy, get the free eBook from Vice President, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley). 

Wednesday Jan 07, 2015

How Effective is Blogging for Software Developer Outreach?

By Joe Dumas, Oracle Applications User Experience

When you blog, are you reaching the right audience? Is blogging an effective way to spread your message? These are some of the questions that the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) Communications and Outreach team asked me to help answer.

The team made the Simplified User Experience Design Patterns for the Oracle Applications Cloud Service eBook available for free on the web. They announced its availability on the Usable Apps blog.

Simplified User Experience Design Patterns for the Oracle Applications Cloud Service eBook

Simplified User Experience Design Patterns for the Oracle Applications Cloud Service eBook in use.

The eBook contains user experience design guidance and examples for building the Oracle Applications Cloud simplified UI. The target audience was developers building applications with Oracle ADF in the Oracle Java Cloud Service. To download the eBook (in a tablet-friendly format of choice), developers registered their name and email address on the eBook landing page.

To gather the information for analysis, I created a short online survey of questions and, using that database of thousands of email addresses, invited those registered users to complete the survey, without either obligation or incentive.

Of course, developers might have heard about the eBook in other ways, such as attending an OAUX workshop or visiting the Usable Apps website.

However, when I tabulated the survey results, more than half of the respondents had found out about the eBook from the blog.

Furthermore, I found that of those who used the book extensively, some 70% said they had first heard about it from the blog.

I also found that the survey respondents were mostly the very people for whom the book was intended. 70% of respondents made user interface design decisions for applications development teams, and all either worked for Oracle Partners or were applications development consultants for Oracle products.

I’ll explore in a further blog article about what parts of the eBook developers found most useful and other insights. But, as a taster, I can let you know now about receiving positive comments again and again about developers being “thrilled” with the content.

In these days of pervasive social media and other communications channels and a debate about the effectiveness of different online platforms, these findings show that blogs are indeed an effective way to reach out to a target audience, especially one committed to finding ways to work faster and smarter.

Do you communicate with developers or other information technology professionals using a blog? How often do you blog, and why? Share your experience in the comments.

For more eBook goodness from OAUX, download the Oracle Applications Cloud UX Strategy and Trends eBook too. More details are on the Voice of User Experience (VoX) blog.

Thursday Nov 20, 2014

Concept to Code: Shaping and Shipping Innovative User Experience Solutions for the Enterprise

It was an exciting event here at Oracle Headquarters as our User Experience AppsLab (@theappslab) Director Jake Kuramoto (@jkuramot) recently hosted an internal design jam called Shape and ShipIt. Fifteen top-notch members of the newly expanded team got together for two days with a packed schedule to research and innovate cutting-edge enterprise solutions, write use cases, create wireframes, and build and code solutions. They didn’t let us down.

The goal: Collaborate and rapidly design practical, contextual, mobile Oracle Applications Cloud solutions that address real-world user needs and deliver enterprise solutions that are streamlined, natural, and intuitive user experiences.

The result: Success! Four new stellar user experience solutions were delivered to take forward to product development teams working on future Oracle Application Cloud simplified user interface releases.

Design jam event banner

Design jam event banner

While I cannot share the concepts or solutions with you as they are under strict lock and key, I can share our markers of the event’s success with you.

The event was split into two days:

  • Day 1: A “shape” day during which participants received invaluable guidance from Bill Kraus on the role of context and user experience, then researched and shaped their ideas through use cases and wireframes.
  • Day 2: A “ship” day during which participants coded, reviewed, tested, and presented their solutions to a panel of judges that included Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President of the Oracle Applications User Experience team.

It was a packed two days full of ideas, teamwork, and impressive presentations.

Photo: Participants Anthony Lai, Bill Kraus, and Luis Galeana [photo: Sandra Lee]

Participants Anthony Lai, Bill Kraus, and Luis Galeana [photo: Sandra Lee (@SandraLee0415)]

The participants formed four small teams that comprised managers, architects, researchers, developers, and interaction designers whose specific perspectives proved to be invaluable to the tasks at hand. Their blend of complementary skills enabled the much needed collaboration and innovation.

Photo: Diversity drives more innovation at Oracle. Participants Mark Vilrokx, Osvaldo Villagrana, Raymond Xie Julia Blyumen, and Joyce Ohgi hard at work. [photo: Karen Scipi]

Diversity drives more innovation at Oracle. Participants Mark Vilrokx, Osvaldo Villagrana, Raymond Xie Julia Blyumen, and Joyce Ohgi hard at work. [photo: Karen Scipi (@KarenScipi)]

Although participants were charged with a short timeframe for such an assignment, they were quick to adapt and refine their concepts and produce solutions that could be delivered and presented in two days. Individual team agility was imperative for designing and delivering solutions within a two-day timeframe.

Participants were encouraged to brainstorm and design in ways that suited them. Whether it was sitting at tables with crayons, paper, notebooks and laptops, or hosting walking meetings outside, the participants were able to discuss concepts and ideate in their own, flexible ways.

Photo: Brainstorming with notebooks and pens: Cindy Fong and Tony Orciuoli [photo: Sandra Lee]

Brainstorming with notebooks and pens: Cindy Fong and Tony Orciuoli [photo: Sandra Lee]

Photo: Brainstorming with laptops: Noel Portugal and Ben Bendig [photo: Karen Scipi]

Brainstorming with laptops: Noel Portugal and Ben Bendig 
[photo: Karen Scipi]

As with all of our simplified user interface design efforts, participants kept a “context produces magic” perspective front and center throughout their activities. In the end, team results yielded responsive, streamlined, context-driven user experience solutions that were simple yet powerful.

Healthy “brain food” and activity breaks were encouraged, and both kept participants engaged and focused on the important tasks at hand. Salads, veggies, dips, pastas, wraps, and sometimes a chocolate chip cookie (for the much needed sugar high) were on the menu. The activity break of choice was an occasional competitive game of table tennis at the Oracle Fitness Center, just a stone’s throw from the event location. The balance of think-mode and break-mode worked out just right for participants.

Photo: Healthful sustenance: Lunch salads [photo: Karen Scipi]

Healthful sustenance: Lunch salads [photo: Karen Scipi]

Our biggest marker of success, though, was how wrong we were. Yes. Wrong. While we expected one team’s enterprise solution to clearly stand out from among all of the others, we were pleasantly surprised as all four were equally impressive, viable, and well-received by the design jam judges. Four submissions, four winners. Nice job!

Photo: Participants (standing) Cindy Fong, Sarahi Mireles, and Tony Orciuoli present their enterprise solution to the panel of judges (seated): Jake Kuramoto, Jatin Thaker, Tim Dubois, Jeremy Ashley, and Bill Kraus [photo: Karen Scipi]

Participants (standing) Cindy Fong, Sarahi Mireles, and Tony Orciuoli present their enterprise solution to the panel of judges (seated): Jake Kuramoto, Jatin Thaker, Tim Dubois, Jeremy Ashley, and Bill Kraus [photo: Karen Scipi]

Stay tuned to the Usable Apps Blog to learn more about such events and what happens to the innovative user experiences that emerge!

Wednesday Aug 27, 2014

Dress Code 2.0: Wearable Tech Meetup at the OTN Lounge at Oracle OpenWorld 2014

What? Dress Code 2.0: Wearable Tech Meetup at the OTN Lounge at Oracle OpenWorld 2014

When? Tuesday, 30-September-2014, 4-6 PM

Partners! Customers! Java geeks! Developers everywhere! Lend me your (er, wearable tech) ears!

Get your best wearables technology gear on and come hang out with the Oracle Applications User Experience team and friends at the OTN Lounge Wearables Technology Meetup at Oracle OpenWorld 2014.

Oracle Apps UX and OTN augmenting and automating work with innnovation and the cloud
  • See live demos of Oracle ideation and proof of concept wearable technology—smart watches, heads-up displays, sensors, and other devices and UIs—all integrated with the Oracle Java Cloud.
  • Try our wearable gadgets for size, and chat with the team about using OTN resources to design and build your own solutions.
  • Show us your own wearables and discuss the finer points of use cases, APIs, integrations, UX design, and fashion and style considerations for wearable tech development, and lots more!

Inexpensive yet tasteful gifts for attendees sporting wearable tech, while supplies last!

Note: A 2014 Oracle OpenWorld or JavaOne conference badge is required for admittance to the OTN Lounge. 

More?

Wednesday May 28, 2014

Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8 Customization: Your User Interface, Your Text

Introducing the User Interface Text Editor

In Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8, there’s an addition to the customization tool set, called the User Interface Text Editor  (UITE). When signed in with an application administrator role, users launch this new editing feature from the Navigator's Tools > Customization > User Interface Text menu option.

See how the editor is in there with other customization tools?

User Interface Text is launched from the Navigator

User Interface Text Editor is launched from the Navigator Customization menu

Applications customers need a way to make changes to the text that appears in the UI, without having to initiate an IT project. Business users can now easily change labels on fields, for example. Using a composer and activated sandbox, these users can take advantage of the Oracle Metadata Services (MDS), add a key to a text resource bundle, and then type in their preferred label and its description (as a best practice for further work, I’d recommend always completing that description).

Oracle Composer used to change field labels

Changing a simplified UI field label using Oracle Composer

In Release 8, the UITE enables business users to easily change UI text on a much wider basis. As with composers, the UITE requires an activated sandbox where users can make their changes safely, before committing them for others to see.

The UITE is used for editing UI text that comes from Oracle ADF resource bundles or from the Message Dictionary (or FND_MESSAGE_% tables, if you’re old enough to remember such things).

Functionally, the Message Dictionary is used for the text that appears in business rule-type error, warning or information messages, or as a text source when ADF resource bundles cannot be used. In the UITE, these Message Dictionary texts are referred to as Multi-part Validation Messages.  

If the text comes from ADF resource bundles, then it’s categorized as User Interface Text in the UITE. This category refers to the text that appears in embedded help in the UI or in simple error, warning, confirmation, or information messages.

The embedded help types used in the application are explained in an Oracle Fusion Applications User Experience (UX) design pattern set. The message types have a UX design pattern set too.

Using UITE 

The UITE enables users to search and replace text in UI strings using case sensitive options, as well as by type. Users select singular and plural options for text changes, should they apply.

Searching and replacing text in UIT

Searching and replacing text in the UITE

The UITE also provides users with a way to preview and manage changes on an exclusion basis, before committing to the final result. There might, for example, be situations where a phrase or word needs to remain different from how it’s generally used in the application, depending on the context.

Previewing tech changes before saving

Previewing replacement text changes. Changes can be excluded where required.

Multi-Part Messages

The Message Dictionary table architecture has been inherited from Oracle E-Business Suite days. However, there are important differences in the Oracle Applications Cloud version, notably the additional message text components, as explained in the UX Design Patterns.

Message Dictionary text has a broad range of uses as indicated, and it can also be reserved for internal application use, for use by PL/SQL and C programs, and so on. Message Dictionary text may even concatenate at run time, where required.

The UITE handles the flexibility of such text architecture by enabling users to drill down on each message and see how it’s constructed in total. That way, users can ensure that any text changes being made are consistent throughout the different message parts.

Multipart messages in UI

Multi-part (Message Dictionary) message components in the UITE

Message Dictionary messages may also use supportability related numbers, the ones that appear appended to the message text in the application’s UI. However, should you have the requirement to remove these numbers from users' view, the UITE is not the tool for the job. Instead, see my blog about using the Manage Messages UI.

Thursday Feb 20, 2014

Taking Steps to Innovate: Walking Meetings at Oracle

User experience (UX) is about more than pixels on the screen. UX covers all the areas that workers crisscross on their way to getting their jobs done. It’s an appreciation that what happens offline can be as important as what happens online. It’s about exploring the established ways of working and emerging trends, and understanding how people connect and communicate. Even the smallest, stickiest job aid offers an opportunity for UX innovation in the workplace. Sometimes inspiration is right under your nose. 

Watching my Oracle co-workers, a diverse crowd that spans a wide range of ages and cultures and with a myriad of skills and experiences to share, gives me a window into modern ways of working that others have to pay to observe. Sure, we don’t have a beach volleyball court on the Oracle HQ campus (works for me, as I don’t do shorts). But we do have a beautiful lake.

Plain Sailin' at Oracle's Lake Larry. Where shorts are not needed to be cool.

Oracle’s Redwood Shores HQ campus is clustered around a spectacular lake, affectionately referred to as 'Lake Larry' by the locals.

It’s around that lake that David Haimes, a Senior Director in Oracle Financials Applications Product Development, changed the way he manages his team by introducing walking meetings. I caught up with him to learn more. 

A reasonably active chap to start (by U.S. standards), David was already swimming in the evenings and running at weekends. Then, his wife gave him a FitBit. With that little sensor on the wrist recording his daily activity stats, one glance at the FitBit dashboard analytics revealed those workdays when his activity levels were flatlining. Now, there was an opportunity to put some peaks back into those charts if he could figure out a way to merge work and play.

David recalled hearing about walking meetings on NPR and being impressed with the health and work benefits delivered. He read the good things Kaiser Permanente  (disclosure: an Oracle customer) shared about the practice, and saw the YouTube video about it too. 

So, come January 2014, David introduced walking meetings for his directs, walking around Lake Larry for their one-on-ones. The results are pretty impressive. 

Keepin' it simple on Doctor's (Pepper's) Orders. David Haimes and Floyd Teter.


Keepin' it simple. David Haimes (@dhaimes), and Oracle partner UX champ Floyd Teter (@fteter) of IO Consulting, walk the walk and talk the talk of today’s applications at Oracle HQ.

David’s blogged about his experiences to an eager audience, explaining how walking meetings enabled higher rates of problem solving and creativity in the team. Freed from the confined atmosphere of a building or office and out in the (usually) sunny Silicon Valley environment, he’s found that “meetings are more productive…we can actually talk through those issues we need to discuss, think about them clearly and agree on actions”.  And, those ‘let’s-take-a-walk’ moments are also a perfect way to broach tricky subjects that might be harder to bring up across a desk or on email.

Not only that. His daily mileage has gone from 2 to 3 miles a day to 4 to 6 miles a day!

Inspired by David’s initiative, co-workers in Oracle are starting their own walking meetings, too. Fans of this new “mobile” approach to workforce management name check Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg as early adopters, and there’s even a walking meetings hashtag. But, walking meetings are not just a cool thing to do. They come with business benefits.

So, what could this mean for applications UX?

David records ideas and actions during his walking meetings using iPhone apps and voice technology. Plenty of mobile tools are out there already to choose from, and we will surely see new wearables emerge for unobtrusively capturing notes and ideas as people move about. 

However, I don’t think it’s the technology foot that we need to put forward first. It’s the context—people at work connecting with each other across traditional boundaries to creatively solve shared challenges. That is the opportunity—how to enable people to connect and collaborate even more effectively—that we might look to enhance. The best wearable technology fits the user, and not the other way around. That’s the step we need to take to start innovating from how we observe how, such as taking walking meetings.

FitBit Dashboard
FitBit dashboard: Work-based opportunities for such data are emerging.

Then, there’s that FitBit (and similar devices). There are rich possibilities for what we might do with such data gathered seamlessly by sensors and then served up as dashboard analytics on a smart phone for immediate action or on a desktop for more in-depth analysis. Think about what this sort of aggregated data might mean for how we measure and manage corporate healthcare, wellness programs, employee availability, productivity, and so on.

Walk this way!

Thursday Feb 13, 2014

Learning to Build a Wearables User Experience from Mickey Mouse

Using wearable technology in work is a hot topic, offering possibilities of increased productivity for businesses by augmenting and automating the tasks of the wearer. 

The Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) team recently ran a wearables design jam at Oracle’s HQ in Redwood Shores. This pilot event was for Oracle employees to learn how to design wearables for the enterprise and to develop an outreach program for customers and partners to share in the lessons learned in building such solutions.

Wearables at Work: Pebble Ideas Fuel Innovation at Oracle

Wearables at work: Use cases are emerging that add real business value 


Design jam teams were given an overview of the latest on wearables technologies and uses in the consumer and enterprise space. Cool apps already developed by OAUX for Google Glass heads-up display and the Pebble smart watch where demoed, live.

To power the teams understanding of wearables fundamentals and to inspire quick results, teams watched videos about the Disney Glow with the Show technology (yes, that's the Mickey Mouse angle) and about how rapid prototyping using household items lead to a game-changing, heads-up display device.

Currently popular wearables are built using different technologies, but use design concepts that work well across devices and make for productive building, such as the small screen card paradigm for information display.  Design jam teams were provided with UX guidelines that reflected enterprise build methodologies and usage requirements, a reminder that UX is now not just about how you wink; it’s about how you work. So, with this wearables learning in mind, the hands-on design began!


DIY Wearables Design Kit

You wear it well—design jam DIY toolkits being put to good use

The design jam was a non-coding event. Instead, teams were equipped with DIY toolboxes and given free reign to design a wearable that was as innovative or as “out there” as they wish with just two caveats. Firstly, it had to solve an identified enterprise problem and secondly, it had to be buildable with, or integrated with, Oracle technology. The result was amazing creativity quickly shown by teams, reflecting the diversity and talent of Oracle employees worldwide.

Team Air Glove Design Jam Wearable Creativity!

Oracle design jam team Air Glove solution featured heads-up display glasses, sensory gloves, and a special “Skunk Works” sensor (indicated by a WiFi-enabled skunk stencil). 

The design jam approach is a great way to learn about wearables and for newly hired employees to connect socially and professionally with co-workers in a fun way. And, there was a business focus too. Teams nuanced their wearable designs for the enterprise world, exploring how to integrate solutions with other applications and data in the cloud, for example. 

All designs were outstanding. After OAUX VP Jeremy Ashley gave an update on the latest wearables technology and opportunities, the team with the most promising design was rewarded by each member receiving an inexpensive, yet tasteful, wearable technology prize. 

The lessons from the wearables design jam and other user experience insight will be used refine our wearables enablement and expertise. That knowledge will be shared with our customers and partners to build wearables solutions too.

So, watch out for wearables enablement events coming your way! Stay tuned to the Usable Apps website and VOX blog, and follow @usableapps on Twitter.

Saturday Dec 07, 2013

Simple to Use. Simple to Build. Simple to Sell: Apps UX Enables Oracle Partners in the UK

Just back from Manchester, in the UK, where the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team (with Oracle Worldwide Alliances and Channels) held an outreach and communications event for Oracle PartnerNetwork members, this one aimed at applications pre-sale teams.

These events are all about sharing the UX message, partner learning, and an opportunity for networking and relationship building. But, they're a two-way exercise. Applications UX get to understand local market requirements and to respond with the right message and resources for customers and partners. Attendees tell it to us straight about how to make sales deals happen, and the insight we get from pitch-back sessions where attendees use those UX messages as part of their own sales stories is invaluable.

Julien Laforêt of Oracle France delivers a sales pitch based on OSN integration with Oracle Cloud Applications

Our latest UX Sales Ambassador Julien Laforêt (@julienlaforet) of Oracle France pitches a compelling social integration message to an engaged audience. Sold!

Learning and Listening

In Manchester, attendees learned the UX fundamentals of our Cloud applications, how to communicate the business benefits of our UX science, and identify enduring return on investment for customers. For example, one big win is the simplicity with which our Oracle Sales Cloud and Oracle HCM Cloud simplified UI applications (available now in Release 7) can not only be used out of the box without training, but easily customized and extended using composers to meet customer business requirements, too. It’s simple to build on that great UX, without needing a major IT project.

The Applications UX team were listening. We heard how important social network integration is to applications customers, the must-haves for ease of use and tailoring, how regional customers must have those  localizations to do business, PaaS partner applications integration drivers, the enablement of continued ROI for coexisting applications, the need to address productivity needs of heads-down workers, getting that UX message out to Oracle Forms customers, meeting public sector procurement requirements, and more. Mobile apps were a very hot topic too, and our demoing of two Oracle apps (Oracle E-Business Suite and Oracle Cloud Applications) live and showing off the latest mobile toolkit wiki of Oracle Mobile Application Development Framework (ADF) components and UX design patterns hit the target.

Ultan O'Broin demos Oracle EBS Mobile Field Service

Live demo of the Oracle E-Business Suite Mobile Field Service app by Ultan O’Broin (@ultan) (Springboard UX design pattern shown on screen).

Applications UX showed and shared demos for applications desktop and mobile UIs, all built using UX design patterns and Oracle ADF, and delivered the latest info on the Simplified UI Release 7 applications and how to use composers to extend those applications. We also revealed emerging innovations and business cases, demoing wearables, for example. The CRM Google Glass app was a big hit!

Noel Portugal demos Fusion CRM app on Google Glass

Noel Portugal (@noelportugal) demonstrates a CRM app live on Google Glass.

Getting Involved 

So, customers, developers, customers, are you preparing to join us in 2014? Watch out for more enablement events coming to your country or region next year. Stay tuned to the Voice of User Experience (VOX) blog and to @usableapps on Twitter for the latest details.

See you signed up for one of our communications and outreach events in 2014!

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