Wednesday Feb 22, 2012

Oracle Fusion Apps NLS Release: Translations Available

Oracle Fusion Applications NLS versions (that's translations to you lot) are available.  The following translations are included (I make it 11): Arabic, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazilian), and Spanish.

See the document Oracle Fusion Applications NLS Release Notes, 11g Release 1, Update 1 (11.1.2.0.0) [ID 1394137.1] on My Oracle Support (MOS). Access to MOS required to read the notes.

Oracle Fusion Applications Arabic version during language QA. Image may not represent final, released version.

Oracle Fusion Applications Arabic version during language QA. Image may not represent final released version.

Some notes:

  • Fusion Apps UIs, including embedded help is fully translated. Basically, seed data, messages, and anything in ADF resource bundles (I think that just about covers it) is translated. XLIFF is used.
  • Nonembedded help (that means the doc and help) is not translated in 11g Release 1, Update 1 (11.1.2.0.0). The strategy for that translation is communicated in-country and can also be explained to any Oracle Usability Advisory Board (OUAB) members who are interested in apps globalization issues.
  • Arabic requires the use of a later version of Microsoft Internet Explorer, still. Other browsers are currently in certification. If you have observations on this, let me know.
  • NLS install requires you to have English Oracle Fusion Applications 11g Release 1, Update 1 installed first. See the following docs:
    • Oracle Fusion Applications Installation Guide
    • Oracle Fusion Applications Patching Guide
    • Oracle Fusion Applications Release Notes for instructions for installing Oracle Fusion Applications 11g Release, 1 Update 1 (English, on MOS)

Color and other Favorites: Microsoft Does UK English in the UI

Said it before, but the excuse that "you bought it from an American company" just isn't good enough as a response to Oracle user feedback about US spellings used in the UI (who reads that doc, anyway?). I've heard many times from customers outside the US that they're driven nuts by color, favorites, and so on, but also by US-centric terminology used in the UI. There is a serious UX downside to not letting customers have language the way they want it, and indeed the way their corporate culture, whatever about country or region, demands. Productivity, training, morale, loyalty are all impacted, and Oracle needs to respond.

Delighted to see that in time for International Mother Language Day 2012, Microsoft has announced that Windows 8 users in the UK will have UK English UIs. Well done Microsoft! I pointed out last year how Google already did this.

Oracle, too, is serious about a total user experience and giving customers what they want in their UIs, the means to easily change it, and to look up terms is now on the cards. Stay tuned for information on this.

Enterprise apps are under pressure from consumerization of IT trends.  Clearly, then Microsoft is responding to the market, a fact reflected by the release of an UK English Style Guide for Windows Phone. Mobile UX is one where consumerization cannot be so easily dismissed (SAP hasreleased a consumer mobile app too). Choice of language needs to reflect all this, too. 

If you want to er, complain to someone about US versus UK English in your Oracle apps UI, then contact me!

Sunday Feb 12, 2012

Oracle E-Business Suite: Features and Capabilities for Global UX

There is excellent global user experience afforded to users of Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12, all based on solid internationalization (i18n) and out of the box multilingual support (MLS). The engineering and features were covered by Maher Al-Nubani, Director of Internationalization Development in his webcast about Oracle E-Business Suite Internationalization and Multilingual Features.

Maher covered such areas as single global instance deployment, Unicode, BiDi, regional preferences (locale), MLS architecture basics, international calendar and first day of the week support, currencies, and  multilingual reporting. Check out the presentation slides (PDF) for full details.

Bidirectional Support in EBS
Here's a few features and capabilities, amongst others, that I think are particularly well-grounded in meeting the user experience needs of Oracle applications customers who deploy globally.  These are the kind of usability areas that the Oracle Usability Advisory Board (OUAB) members address through the Globalization UX working group. EBS implementors, take note.

  • Lightweight MLS support: New in EBS 12.1.3, by using OAM, multinational companies can activate languages without applying NLS (translation) patches. This means the user interface (UI) remains in English but setup, data and reporting is in the customer's language.  This is a customer requirement often missed. Combined with localizations functionality, an English UI with language data entry and printing is a powerful and effective solution that enables enterprises to work globally while using and sharing information according to local conventions. Full translations can be later easily added if required, for extra flexibility and evolution of the user experience.
  • Complete Excel data exchange: Business users just love Microsoft Excel! And, in EBS 12.1.3, customers can export data using comma or tab separated values (commas, of course, can be other kind of delimiters in other countries/locales). Plus, a choice of Unicode UTF-8 or UTF-16 export options means users can safely use Microsoft Excel to handle their data's character set encodings.
  • Cultural calendars: EBS 12.1.1 added support for the Arabic Hijrah and Thai Solar calendars. EBS 12.1.2 allows users to specify their first day of the week (it's Sunday, and not Monday for some). These UI features allow users to work in accordance with their local customs and conventions, but without impacting business logic or data.
  • BI Publisher global reporting: BIP's excellent internationalization foundation enables customers to communicate with other parts of their organization, suppliers, vendors, and other agencies easily. Without any dependency on installed languages or the DB character set, customers can create a report template for their language, country or region, and translate it easily themselves using XLIFF. For apps customers, reporting in the local language using customized templates and flexibility in how they work is a very big deal.
  • More Unicode support: Been there for a while now through Unicode (UTF8) introduced in Release 11i, EBS 12.1 uses the AL32UTF8 encoding, based on the latest Unicode standard to support more characters and languages. AL32UTF8 is is the default Unicode database character set for EBS 12.1 installations for multiple languages. AL32UTF8 is the default in Oracle Fusion Applications Release 11g R2, by the way.
  • Additional language translations: EBS 12.1  is now translated into 34 languages, adding Indonesian, Lithuanian, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese. The myth that  every enterprise apps user speaks English has long been exposed as just that, a myth. It is also important to realize that not only do local users demand UIs in their own language, but the domain specific aspects of enterprise apps means that it is easier for them to understand and use translated versions, even when they do speak conversational English. Better productivity and user satisfaction in the workplace is the result.

Great features and support for our global customers! Refer to the resources at the end of Maher's presentation for availability, implementation details and more information. Watch out for some news about OUAB activities globally soon, too.

About

Oracle applications global user experience (UX): Culture, localization, internationalization, language, personalization, more. For globally-savvy UX people, so that it all fits together for Oracle's worldwide customers.

Audience: Enterprise applications translation and localization topics for the user experience professional (designers, engineers, developers, researchers)!
Profile

Ultan Ó Broin. Director, Global Applications User Experience, Oracle Corporation. On Twitter: @localization

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