Thursday Mar 22, 2007

Web 2.0 Developer Matter: Make Sure You Know Who Your Customers Are!

 

Mark Cuban is not as maverick as he often pretends to be. His recent blog on the GooTube vs Viacom case is quiet insightful and right on the money on the most important issue developers should be concerned when building Web 2.0 services:

"Ebay knows their customers. Loopnet knows their customers. I happen to believe that its key that the "Service Provider" have a real business and infringing action by its users is as much a problem to the Provider as it is to the copyright owner. An ISP makes money with the monthly bill. Ebay makes money from transactions. A real estate hosting company makes money from listings. They all know exactly who their customers are and if one of them uploads infringing materials, they can actually identify the person and if they do it repetitively remove them. In either case, it doesn't change or impact their core business and it helps identify those who dont respect copyright and gives the content owner the option of taking action."

If you are looking to build and deploy a Web 2.0 service make sure you identify and know who your users are. By the way, Sun's has the industry leading Identity Management system to help you build your Web 2.0 services, and helped develop JXTA, the industry leading open-source P2P platform that provides peer identity and security as a core platform feature :-)

Go Mavericks!

Friday Nov 03, 2006

Could it be that Google Index is loosing its mind?

I have been for a while wondering what will happen when Google's centralized billion indexes get out of waxes and start to return random results. How can you fix or recover this beast without shutting it down?

I have been using Google Alerts service for some time:

What are Google Alerts?

Google Alerts are emails automatically sent to you when there are new Google results for your search terms.

This alert service has been working quiet well for me. So, you cannot really be sure how much scrawling in the deep Web Google is doing. But, at least when you get a new alert, you feel the service is working and is quiet useful. To my surprise over the last week or so, I am now receiving a bunch of new alerts for pages that are not really really news! I just received an alarm for this page that was published  more than 4 year ago.

Google Web Alert for: jxta

ONJava.com -- Getting Started with JXTA, Part 1
Learn how to get started with JXTA in this book excerpt series.

 This as-it-happens Google Alert is brought to you by Google.

Could it be? While a centralized index has great advantage, it also has one big Achilles heel. It's a single point of failure.  In contrast, the Internet uses a decentralized index to maintain IP route information that is a quiet resilient. I have been wondering if it will be better to use a more decentralized search indexing infrastructure for the Internet. I can see now a bunch of our new black box containers acting as decentralized content indexing routers as today IP routers.

Hopefully I am the only one seeing these false alerts, and this just a bug where a few pages are incorrectly republished. If not, we may have reached an interesting inflexion point.
 

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