Friday Feb 14, 2014

Java ME Embedded 8 Early Access 2

The long awaited second early access release of Oracle Java ME Embedded 8 is available on OTN.

It comes with the following updates and enhancements to the Oracle Java ME Embedded software:

  • Enhanced device controls and improved input/output (IO) for small embedded devices, including a windowed Watchdog timer.
  • Ongoing support for CLDC 8 and Profile MEEP 8
  • Device Access APIs
  • Generic Connection Framework (GCF) API

See the following Reference Platform Release Notes for more information about the new features and platform-specific aspects:

Release Notes for Raspberry Pi

Release Notes for Qualcomm IoE

See the Oracle Java ME Software Development Kit Release Notes to learn how these features can be used to develop Java ME applications with Java ME SDK.

The Java ME documentation team published the Getting Started Guides for all the supported platforms. Ready to try the new features? Check the following documents:

Java ME Embedded and SDK documentation and related API specifications can be found at docs.oracle.com/javame.

Friday Feb 07, 2014

Restructured Deployment Information

The deployment guide for Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) has been reorganized and relevant information from the obsolete pre-6u10 deployment and plugin guides has been updated and included. The obsolete guides have been removed from the JDK 7 documentation set and replaced with pages that direct you to the Java Rich Internet Applications Guide.

Due to the reorganization, the URL for some pages has changed. If you get a Page Not Found error, please use the Table of Contents for the Java Rich Internet Applications Guide to locate the page.

The pre-6u10 Deployment Guide and Plug-in Guide are available in the JDK 6 documentation set.

Friday Sep 20, 2013

JavaFX 8 Developer Preview Documents Released!

JavaFX Documentation

JavaFX 8 Developer Preview Documents were published today on http://docs.oracle.com/javafx. They comprise Getting Started with JavaFX 3D Graphics, Adding HTML Content to JavaFX Applications, and Embedding Swing Content in JavaFX Applications.

3D Graphics

A new document, Getting Started with JavaFX 3D Graphics, introduces the 3D graphics features that are included in the upcoming JavaFX 8 APIs. The features include 3D shapes, camera, lights, subscene, materials, and picking. The document also steps you through the creation of a simple 3D sample application, MoleculeSampleApp, that uses some of the 3D features discussed in the document.

WebView

The JavaFX WebView tutorial was extended to highlight the new features and improvements in the JavaFX 8 Web component. Review Supported Features of HTML5 for more information about additional HTML5 features including Web Sockets, Web Workers, and Web Fonts. Make the most of your WebView based applications with the new printing capabilities covered in Printing HTML Content.

Embedding Swing Content

The ability to embed JavaFX content in Swing applications has existed since the JavaFX 2.0 release. This tutorial introduces the SwingNode class available in the JavaFX 8 APIs that provides reverse integration. A new document describes how to embed Swing components in JavaFX applications and provides working applications that illustrate Swing buttons with HTML content embedded in a JavaFX application and interoperability between Swing and JavaFX buttons.

Tuesday Sep 10, 2013

JavaFX 2.2.40 Documentation Introduces the New Deployment Features

The JavaFX Deployment Guide was updated for the JavaFX 2.2.40 release to describe the new User JVM Arguments in the Ant tasks. Now you can create applications that allow users to override jvm options. For example, users can change the heap size for the application.

A new <fx:jvmuserarg> attribute has been added to <fx:platform>. This new attribute explicitly defines an attribute that can be overridden by users. For instance:

    <fx:platform>
        <fx:jvmuserarg name="-Xmx" value="768m" />
    </fx:platform>

For this specific case, -Xmx768m is passed as a default value for the heap size. The user can override this value in a user configuration file (on Linux and Mac) or in the registry in Windows.

For more information see the Deploying JavaFX Applications guide.

JavaFX Scene Builder 1.1 General Availability Released!

JavaFX Scene Builder 1.1 has reached General Availability (GA) and is now live!

You can download it from the JavaFX Downloads page.

This version includes support for the Linux platform, a new CSS Analyzer feature, and several usability improvements. For additional information on what's included with the release, see the Scene Builder 1.1 Release Notes.

The release also includes various updates to the Scene Builder 1.1 documentation, including the Using JavaFX Scene Builders with Java IDEs document.

Monday Sep 09, 2013

JDK 8 Documentation - Developer Preview Release

JDK 8 Documentation - Developer Preview Release

Java Development Kit Release 8 (JDK 8) Early Access Documentation, which helps developers explore features in the upcoming JDK 8 release, has been enhanced and updated. It comprises the Developer Guides, The Java Tutorials, and API documentation.

Download JDK 8 Early Access from JDK 8 Project.

Use the Project Feedback forum if you have suggestions for or encounter issues using JDK 8. If you find bugs in a release, submit them using the usual Java SE bug reporting channels.

The following describes where you can find documentation for specific JDK 8 enhancements:

Language and Library Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the Java language or the JDK library:

Lambda Expressions

Lambda expressions enable you to treat functionality as a method argument, or code as data. They also let you express instances of single-method classes more compactly. For example, you could use a lambda expression to perform a certain action on each element of a collection, when a process is completed, or when a process encounters an error. See the section Lambda Expressions in The Java Tutorials.

Method references enable you to refer to an existing method by name; they are compact, easy-to-read lambda expressions for methods that already have a name. See the section Method References in The Java Tutorials.

Bulk data expressions iterate over collections on your behalf, which enable you to write more concise and efficient code that process elements stored in collections. You specify lambda expressions as parameters for bulk data operations. This enables you to customize the behavior of a particular bulk data operation. The Collections trail will feature a new lesson about bulk data operations.

Parallel Array Sorting

JDK 7 introduced the Fork/Join framework for lightweight data parallelism, but users have to implement their own algorithms for simple/common tasks. In JDK 8, the Fork/Join framework is used to provide a standard implementation of parallel sorting for arrays.

For more information, see the Fork/Join and Arrays lessons in The Java Tutorials.

Annotations API Updates

Java SE 8 includes significant updates to the Annotations API:

  • It is now possible to apply the same annotation type more than once to the same declaration or type use. This feature is called repeating annotations.
  • It is now possible to apply an annotation anywhere a type is used, not just on a declaration. Used in conjunction with a pluggable type system, this feature allows for improved type checking of your code.

For more information, see the Annotations lesson in The Java Tutorials.

Base64 Encoding Schemes

The classes Base64, Base64.Encoder, and Base64.Decoder have been added. Applications that use base64 encoding schemes include those that use Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) and encode passwords for HTTP headers.

For more information, see Enhancements in Packages java.lang.* and java.util.*.

Security Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the security features in Java SE:

Server Name Indication Extension for Server Applications

The Server Name Indication (SNI) extension is a feature that extends the SSL/TLS protocols to indicate what server name the client is attempting to connect to during handshaking. In the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) API for JDK 7, the SunJSSE provider has enabled SNI extension for client applications. JDK 8 supports the SNI extension for server applications as well. Servers can use the SNI to decide if specific SSLSocket or SSLEngine instances should accept a connection.

For information and examples, see the Server Name Indication (SNI) Extension section in the JSSE Reference Guide.

New PKIXRevocationChecker Class

The PKIXRevocationChecker class checks the revocation status of certificates with the X.509-based public-key infrastructure (PKIX) algorithm. It supports best-effort checking, single-certificate checking, and mechanism-specific options and parameters.

For more information, see the Java PKI API Programmer's Guide.

SHA-224 Message Digests

The cryptographic algorithms in JDK 8 have been enhanced with the SHA-224 variant of the SHA-2 family of message-digest implementations. For more information, see the following updated documentation:

Stronger Algorithms for Password-Based Encryption

Several AES password-based encryption (PBE) algorithms, such as PBEWithSHA256AndAES_128 and PBEWithSHA512AndAES_256, have been added to the SunJCE provider. For more information, see the Oracle Providers Documentation.

Enhanced Support for NSA Suite B Cryptography

This enhancement includes the addition of SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, and SHA-512 message digests, as well as SHA224withDSA and SHA256withDSA signatures. Also, the keysize limit for the Diffie-Hellman algorithm has been increased from 1024 to 2048.

For more information, see the Oracle Providers Documentation and the Standard Algorithm Name Documentation.

Internationalization Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the internationalization features in Java SE:

Installation of Custom Resources as Extensions

The java.util.spi.ResourceBundleControlProvider interface enables you to change how the ResourceBundle.getBundle() method loads resource bundles. ResourceBundleControlProvider is a service provider interface (SPI). SPIs enable you to create extensible applications, which are those that you can extend easily without modifying their original code base.

For more information, see the Installing a Custom Resource Bundle as an Extension lesson in The Java Tutorials.

New Calendar and Locale APIs

New and updated Locale and Calendar APIs in JDK 8 support enhancements in the Unicode Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) project. For a list of the APIs, see the Internationalization Enhancements page.

Tools Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the tools and utilities supplied with the JDK:

Pack200 Engine Updates

In Java SE 8, the Java class file format has been updated to reflect changes introduced by JSR 292: Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform. Consequently, the Pack200 engine has been updated accordingly to ensure that class files are compressed effectively. In particular, the Pack200 engine now recognizes constant pool entries and new bytecodes introduced by JSR 292. As a result, compressed files created with this version of the pack200 tool will not be compatible with older versions of the unpack200 tool.

For more information, see the Compression Formats for Network Deployment section of the Java Rich Internet Applications Guide.

Platform and System Support Enhancements

The following enhancements affect support for platforms and systems:

JDK 8 for Linux ARM

JDK 8 provides support for Linux ARMv7-based systems. It is known to run but has not been fully tested on select ARMv6-based systems such as Raspberry Pi. Hard-float application binary interface (ABI) support has been added in JDK 8 for ARM; soft-float ABI support has been removed. Serviceability Agent (SA) has been added in JDK 8 for ARM. See Serviceability in HotSpot and jsadebugd - Serviceability Agent Debug Daemon for more information.

Removed Features

The following features, and their documentation, have been removed from JDK 8:

  • apt Tool: This tool and its associated API contained in the package com.sun.mirror have been removed.
  • JDBC-ODBC Bridge
  • Old Java Plug-in: The Java Plug-in deprecated since Java SE 6 Update 10 has been removed. The Java Rich Internet Applications Guide has been rewritten to reflect this. The old Java Plug-in is not compatible with newer Java technologies as JavaFX. In addition, the current Java Plug-in addresses security weakness found in the old Java Plug-in. For more information about the differences between the old Java Plug-in and the current one, see Applet Developer's Guide in the Java SE 7 Developer Guides.

Upcoming Documentation

Stay tuned for early access documentation related to the following areas:

  • Security Enhancements
    • Overhaul JKS-JCEKS-PKCS12 Keystores, JEP 166
    • MS-SFU Kerberos 5 Extensions, JEP 113
    • Limited doPrivileged, JEP 140
    • AEAD CipherSuites, JEP 115
    • Configurable Secure Random-Number Generation, JEP 123
  • Deployment Enhancements
    • Launch JavaFX Applications, JEP 153
    • Integrating JavaFX into the JRE and JDK
  • Networking Enhancements
  • Library Enhancements
    • Handle Frequent HashMap Collisions with Balanced Trees, JEP 180
    • JAXP 1.5: Restrict Fetching of External Resources, JEP 185
    • Concurrency Updates, JEP 155
    • Date & Time API, JEP 150
  • Language Enhancements
    • Access to Parameter Names at Runtime, JEP 118
    • Features Related to Lambda Expressions, JEP 126
      • Bulk Data Operations, JEP 107
      • Virtual Extension Methods
      • Enhance Core Libraries with Lambda, JEP 109
    • Nashorn JavaScript Engine, JEP 174
  • Tools and Other Enhancements
    • Doclint: javadoc and javac option to provide HTML compliance for Javadoc, JEP 172
    • Updating JVM Command Line Flags and Options
    • Optional Grouping: Provides different method views for generated Javadoc documentation
    • 64-bit Unsigned int Data Type
    • Compact Profiles, JEP 161
  • Removed Features: The documentation for these features will be removed in upcoming early access documentation updates:
    • Removal of ActiveX Bridge

Wednesday Jul 31, 2013

JDK 8 Early Access Developer Documentation Updated

Documentation changes to the Java Developer Guides and The Java Tutorials that reflect new features in the upcoming release of the Java SE Development Kit 8 (JDK 8) are highlighted by the documentation team regularly. Some early access material in The Java Tutorials was already covered earlier this year.

We are enhancing and updating the developer guides with new content as well. You can find all the updated documentation on the JDK 8 Early Access Documentation web site. Some of the changes so far are listed below with links to relevant documents and lessons.

Security Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the security features in Java SE:

Server Name Indication Extension for Server Applications

The Server Name Indication (SNI) extension is a feature that extends the SSL/TLS protocols to indicate what server name the client is attempting to connect to during handshaking. In the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) API for JDK 7, the SunJSSE provider has enabled SNI extension for client applications. JDK 8 supports the SNI extension for server applications as well. Servers can use the SNI to decide if specific SSLSocket or SSLEngine instances should accept a connection.

For information and examples, see the Server Name Indication (SNI) Extension section in the JSSE Reference Guide.

New PKIXRevocationChecker Class

The PKIXRevocationChecker class checks the revocation status of certificates with the X.509-based public-key infrastructure (PKIX) algorithm. It supports best-effort checking, single-certificate checking, and mechanism-specific options and parameters.

For more information, see the Java PKI API Programmer’s Guide.

SHA-224 Message Digests

The cryptographic algorithms in JDK 8 have been enhanced with the SHA-224 variant of the SHA-2 family of message-digest implementations. For more information, see the following updated documentation:

Stronger Algorithms for Password-Based Encryption

Several AES password-based encryption (PBE) algorithms, such as PBEWithSHA256AndAES_128 and PBEWithSHA512AndAES_256, have been added to the SunJCE provider. For more information, see the Oracle Providers Documentation.

Enhanced Support for NSA Suite B Cryptography

This enhancement includes the addition of SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, and SHA-512 message digests, as well as SHA224withDSA and SHA256withDSA signatures. Also, the keysize limit for the Diffie-Hellman algorithm has been increased from 1024 to 2048.

For more information, see the Oracle Providers Documentation and the Standard Algorithm Name Documentation.

Internationalization Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the internationalization features in Java SE:

Installation of Custom Resources as Extensions

The java.util.spi.ResourceBundleControlProvider interface enables you to change how the ResourceBundle.getBundle() method loads resource bundles. ResourceBundleControlProvider is a service provider interface (SPI). SPIs enable you to create extensible applications, which are those that you can extend easily without modifying their original code base.

For more information, see the Installing a Custom Resource Bundle as an Extension lesson in The Java Tutorials.

New Calendar and Locale APIs

New and updated Locale and Calendar APIs in JDK 8 support enhancements in the Unicode Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) project. For a list of the APIs, see the Internationalization Enhancements page.

Tools Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the tools and utilities supplied with the JDK:

Removal of the Old Java Plug-In

The old Java Plug-in (the version available prior to Java SE 6 Update 10) has been removed. The Java Rich Internet Applications Guide has been rewritten to reflect this.

Pack200 Engine Updates

In Java SE 8, the Java class file format has been updated to reflect changes introduced by JSR 292: Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform. Consequently, the Pack200 engine has been updated accordingly to ensure that class files are compressed effectively. In particular, the Pack200 engine now recognizes constant pool entries and new bytecodes introduced by JSR 292. As a result, compressed files created with this version of the pack200 tool will not be compatible with older versions of the unpack200 tool.

For more information, see the Compression Formats for Network Deployment section of the Java Rich Internet Applications Guide.

Language Enhancements

The following enhancements affect the Java language.

Lambda Expressions

Lambda expressions enable you to treat functionality as a method argument, or code as data. They also let you express instances of single-method classes more compactly.

For more information, see the Lambda Expressions lesson in The Java Tutorials.

Parallel Array Sorting

JDK 7 introduced the Fork/Join framework for lightweight data parallelism, but users have to implement their own algorithms for simple/common tasks. In JDK 8, the Fork/Join framework is used to provide a standard implementation of parallel sorting for arrays.

For more information, see the Fork/Join and Arrays lessons in The Java Tutorials.

Annotations API Updates

Java SE 8 includes significant updates to the Annotations API:

  • It is now possible to apply the same annotation type more than once to the same declaration or type use. This feature is called repeating annotations.
  • It is now possible to apply an annotation anywhere a type is used, not just on a declaration. Used in conjunction with a pluggable type system, this feature allows for improved type checking of your code.

For more information, see the Annotations lesson in The Java Tutorials.

Tuesday Jun 18, 2013

JDK 7u25 and JavaFX 2.2.25 Documentation Updates

We are pleased to announce that the Java Development Kit 7 Update 25 (JDK 7u25) release with JavaFX 2.2.25 is live. You can download it from the Java SE Downloads page. Find more information about the new features in the JDK 7u25 Release Notes.

The JDK 7u25 and JavaFX 2.2.25 releases come with various updates in the Java documentation.

Changes to the Java Rich Internet Applications Development and Deployment Guide:

  • Perform Certificate Checks and Check for Certificate Revocation Using sections describe new options for checking that a signing certificate has not been revoked before an applet or Java Web Start application is run.
  • Preventing a RIA from Being Repurposed describes the new Permissions and Codebase attributes for the JAR file manifest. These attributes are used to defend RIAs against unauthorized code repurposing. If the values in the manifest do not match the values in the JNLP file or the applet tag, the RIA is blocked.
  • Security Dialogs provides information on the prompts that are shown when a RIA is started.

Changes to the Deployment Trail of the Java Tutorials:

The File Chooser chapter of the UI Controls tutorial has become the main addition to the JavaFX documentation set. This chapter explains how to use the FileChooser class of the JavaFX API to enable navigating the file system. The document comes with several samples to explain how to open one or several files with the associated application, configure a file chooser dialog window, and save the application content. You can study the source code of the FileChooserSample application or download the NetBeans project with all the samples available in the JavaFX UI Controls tutorial. The WebView tutorial is reworked by the JavaFX 2.2.25 release to address changes in the WebViewSample application. Find the modified version at docs.oracle.com/javafx.

For all tutorials, guides, and API documentation, see Java SE Technical Documentation and JavaFX 2 Documentation

Tuesday Oct 16, 2012

JavaFX 2.2.3 Documentation

JavaFX Documentation

JavaFX 2.2.3 and JDK 7u9 were released today. In addition to the release documentation, the following new information is provided:

  • Learn about some of the "behind the scenes" work for an application, such as threads, events, and binding with the new learning trail on the landing page.
  • Learn how to use cell editors with the List View component. The new example in the UI Controls tutorial shows how to build a list of names by selecting them from a combo box.

Other documents were updated to reflect minor bug fixes.

You can download JavaFX 2.2.3 from OTN. For all tutorials and API documentation, see http://docs.oracle.com/javafx.

Other News:

JavaFX Scene Builder 1.1 Developer Preview was released during the week of JavaOne and is available from OTN. This version contains support for the Linux and Mac OS X 10.8 platforms, and a preview of the new CSS Analyzer feature. See the release notes for more information.

Tuesday May 22, 2012

JavaFX Scene Builder Docs Updated

JavaFX Scene Builder 1.0 Developer Release documentation has been updated with the promotion of development build 38.

  • Getting Started with JavaFX Scene Builder has been modified to use the latest JavaFX 2.2 development build and demonstrate the integration that is now available with the latest NetBeans IDE 7.2 development build. You can create your FXML layout file using the NetBean's New wizard and use the Scene Builder visual tool to continue designing the user interface for your JavaFX application. Simply drag and drop UI components to a work area,modify their properties, apply style sheets, and the FXML code for the layout is automatically generated in the background. The changes are immediately reflected with your project that is opened in the NetBeans IDE.

  • JavaFX Scene Builder User Guide has been modified to reflect the latest UI modifications made with build 38.

Use the JavaFX Scene Builder Installation Guide to help you download, install, and start using JavaFX Scene Builder. All the available JavaFX Scene Builder documentation can be found at http://docs.oracle.com/javafx.

Thursday Apr 26, 2012

New Docs and Updates with JavaFX 2.1

New documentation has been added with the JavaFX 2.1 release.

  • The Getting Started guide has grown into a series of introductory tutorials.
    • Hello World, JavaFX Style introduces you to the basic structure of a JavaFX application. An added benefit of this tutorial is that enables you to test that your JavaFX technology is installed properly.
    • Creating a Form in JavaFX teaches the basics of screen layout, how to add controls to a layout pane, and how to create input events.
    • Fancy Forms with JavaFX CSS is all about making your JavaFX application look attractive by adding a Cascading Style sheet.
    • Using FXML to Create a User Interface shows the benefits of JavaFX FXML in action. Here you use FXML to create the same login user interface as in the earlier section, but this time separating the application design from the application logic.
    • Animation and Visual Effects is the original Colorful Circles tutorial, which shows how to create transparent, colorful circles that move on a black background.
    • Deploying your First JavaFX Application shows how to deploy the Getting Started tutorials.
  • New Tree Animation Example chapter in the Creating Transitions and Timeline Animation in JavaFX document. The chapter describes the Tree animation sample application and provides some tips and tricks regarding animation in JavaFX.
  • Working with Layouts in JavaFX has a new chapter that describes how CSS can be used to style the different types of layout panes. Source code and NetBeans projects have also been added to each chapter to provide the code used in the examples.
  • Getting Started with FXML has been expanded to include the following chapters:
    • FXML—What’s New in JavaFX 2.1 — a list of FXML enhancements in JavaFX 2.1 and incompatibilities with previous releases.
    • Creating an Address Book with FXML — a tutorial that shows how to populate a table with data, sort the data at application startup, align the data in the table cells, and add rows to the table.
    • Deployment of FXML Applications — a description as to why some FXML applications need digital signatures. An alternative to signing the application is also presented.
  • The JavaFX for Swing Developers tutorial provides an overview of JavaFX benefits available to GUI developers, illustrates the JavaFX–Swing interoperability, and shows how to enrich an existing Swing application by taking advantage of JavaFX functionality.
    Send us your feedback to let us know which topics and use cases you would like to be discussed in this document to help Swing developers adopt the JavaFX technology.
  • New Combo Box chapter was added to the JavaFX UI Controls tutorial. Read this chapter to learn how to create combo boxes in your UI, style them, and implement cell factories. All the samples of the JavaFX UI Controls tutorial are available in one NetBeans project now. Download UIControlSamples.zip to explore JavaFX UI controls in action.
  • Refer to Using JavaFX Charts to lean more about the new types of charts supported in JavaFX 2.1: stacked area chart and stacked bar chart.
  • Study the additions to the Web Component tutorial to learn how to perform upcalls from JavaScript to JavaFX.

Our special announcements:

  • JavaFX for Mac is installed with JDK 7u4. See JavaFX SDK 2.1 Installation for Mac OS X for more information.
  • JavaFX Scene Builder 1.0 Developer Release documentation is now available as part of the JavaFX documentation offerings. JavaFX Scene Builder is a visual layout tool that lets you quickly design user interfaces for a JavaFX application.  Simply drag and drop UI components to a work area, modify their properties, apply style sheets, and the FXML code for the layout is automatically generated in the background. You can then bind that UI layout to your Java application's logic. Learn more by reading the JavaFX Scene Builder User Guide and also by creating a simple issue-tracking application using the Getting Started with JavaFX Scene Builder document.

You can download JavaFX 2.1 from OTN. For all tutorials and API documentation, see http://docs.oracle.com/javafx.

Tuesday Feb 14, 2012

New Docs and Updates with JavaFX 2.0.3

New articles and improvements have been added to the documentation for JavaFX 2.0.3 update.

  • Concurrency in JavaFX describes the capabilities provided by the javafx.concurrent package to create multithreaded applications. You learn how to keep your JavaFX application user interface responsive by delegating time-consuming task execution to background threads.

  • JavaFX Interoperability with SWT describes using JavaFX to add visual appeal to your SWT application. The code example shows how easy it is to add a JavaFX scene graph to an SWT application anywhere you can use an SWT canvas, and how an SWT control and JavaFX control can interoperate.

  • Refer to the Tree View chapter of the JavaFX UI Controls tutorial to learn how to build hierarchical structures in your user interfaces and apply the cell factory mechanism. Try the TreeViewSample application to create a simple HR tool and explore basic features of the TreeView and TreeItem classes in action.

  • Handling JavaFX Events has a new chapter that provides an overview of the event processing system and describes the event system classes and the event delivery process. Also added are sample applications that show how event filters and event handlers can be used.

  • A new introduction in Getting Started with FXML provides a basic description of FXML and the benefits of using it to create user interfaces.

As of this release, the PDF downloads that are linked from each JavaFX article have a new look, more like a book. They contain the same content as the HTML pages but pack more information into a page than the previous PDFs, using less paper if you are printing.

You can download JavaFX 2.0.3 from OTN. For all tutorials and API documentation, see http://docs.oracle.com/javafx.

Monday Dec 12, 2011

New Docs with JavaFX 2.0.2

Overview of the new and changed documentation for the JavaFX 2.0.2 release.[Read More]

Thursday Oct 27, 2011

Share Your Ideas!

JavaFX 2.0 Documentation

Thanks to our JavaFX readers who have submitted feedback on the documentation. Our latest release of the JavaFX documentation includes improvements and fixes suggested by our readers. For example, we added a deployment section to the Getting Started tutorial and put more diagrams in the Deployment document.

You can send us feedback from any JavaFX document.  Look for the section titled "We Welcome Your Feedback" in the document right nav bar, as shown in the following figure.

User Feedback Section

Share your ideas on what, from your perspective, needs to be documented.
Which essential concepts are not covered yet?

Help us to help you!

Saturday Sep 17, 2011

Changes in Builds 44 and 45 that Affect the JavaFX Docs

Code changes to be aware of when using the JavaFX 2.0 Beta documentation with JavaFX 2.0 Beta SDK (builds 44 and 45).[Read More]
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