Friday Mar 29, 2013

Java EE, Saviours and Frozen Time...

We've mentioned TomEE in the near past. Led by powerhouse developer David Blevins, it is a very exciting initiative that takes Tomcat and integrates all the necessary APIs to make it a fully certified Java EE 6 Web Profile offering. It makes Java EE a real possibility for developers focused on Tomcat.

Recently InfoWorld published an article on TomEE (to jog your memory these are the same fine folks that recently repeatedly declared Java dead because of the security vulnerability essentially limited to Applets). While most of the content of the article is very good thanks to David, some pretty curious views on Java EE got infused by the InfoWorld writer. Apparently, Java EE is frozen in time, something only people in gray cubicles care about and TomEE is Java EE's only hope for survival. It did not take very long for David to distance himself and TomEE from the article.

Some of us clearly see things a bit differently than InfoWorld (and suspect that most of you do as well). Specifically, I thought it's useful for you to consider the following few points as food for thought:

  • Pound-for-pound, the amount of innovation in Java EE and it's ecosystem rivals pretty much any other technology stack out there. Just some innovations one could mention is delivering the Java community from XML, configuration and jar hell using annotations, intelligent defaults and convention-over configuration, the radically reimagined EJB 3+ API,  Facelets, the CDI API, JAX-RS, Servlet 3, Bean Validation, the transformations in JMS 2, WebSocket and so on. There have been few significant technologies in the ecosystem that have not directly benefited from or outright adopted these changes. It's easy to see the scale of changes even from my very high level talks on Java EE 6 and Java EE 7. As a result, Java EE today is easily one of the most productive and powerful development platforms around.
  • Continued strong Java EE adoption in the community is a change that's here to stay. Even some organizations that once outright dismissed Java EE have now brought it back into their evaluation cycles. Our GlassFish stories, complete with videos are a nice concrete manifestation of this.
  • The JCP is a far different animal than what it was just a few years ago. The level of openness and ongoing reform geared towards reaching out to the average developer is patently obvious to folks like me and many others that have worked within the JCP as independents in recent years. You can see the end results in action from Arun's recent blog on JCP transparency and the adopt-a-JSR program that helps power it.
  • Java EE today is far more than just WebSphere 5 and WebLogic 9. There are options to suit any particular organization's needs such as GlassFish, JBoss, Resin and of course TomEE just to name a few. Even WebSphere and WebLogic have gone through wholesale changes thanks to modularity solutions like OSGi and  the Web Profile. The changes are not difficult to see if you look at things like the WebSphere Liberty Profile.

Perhaps my fellow Java EE/GlassFish comrade John Clingan said it best in his blog entry on the InfoWorld article - what is truly frozen in time is the idea that Java EE is the helpless damsel in distress waiting for a knight in shining armour to save her...

Tuesday Mar 12, 2013

David Blevins on TomEE/Java EE Web Profile

TomEE is one of the most exciting developments in the Java EE ecosystem. For those unaware, TomEE is a very cool Apache project that starts from Tomcat and adds OpenWebBeans, OpenEJB, OpenJPA, MyFaces, Apache CXF and ActiveMQ to create a very capable, lightweight Java EE environment! TomEE is one of the greatest examples of certified Java EE Web Profile implementations. It is also a great option for Java EE developers focused on Tomcat.

 

David Blevins, the project lead for TomEE, recently did a pretty interesting interview with JAX Magazine. In the interview, David talked about the history/motivation/value proposition behind TomEE, the Java EE Web Profile, the relationship between CDI, EJB and Java EE, the relationship between Tomcat and TomEE as well as Java EE 7. It is definitely a worthwhile, thought-provoking read...

Friday Jan 04, 2013

Using Apache TomEE with NetBeans

TomEE is one of the most exciting developments in the Java EE ecosystem. For those unaware, TomEE is a very cool Apache project that starts from Tomcat and adds OpenWebBeans, OpenEJB, OpenJPA, MyFaces, Apache CXF and ActiveMQ to create a very capable Java EE environment! TomEE is one of the greatest examples of certified Java EE Web Profile implementations. It is also a great option for Java EE developers focused on Tomcat.

This great article describes how you can use TomEE with NetBeans (you can also use Eclipse, check the TomEE docs).

Monday Jun 11, 2012

Petstore using Java EE 6 ? Almost!

Antonio Goncalves, a Java Champion, JUG leader, and a well-known author, has started building a Petstore-like application using Java EE 6. The complete end-to-end sample application will build a eCommerce website and follows the Java EE 6 design principles of simple and easy-to-use to its core. Its using several technologies from the platform such as JPA 2.0, CDI 1.0, Bean Validation 1.0, EJB Lite 3.1, JSF 2.0, and JAX-RS 1.1.

Pet Store

The two goals of the project are:

• use Java EE 6 and just Java EE 6 : no external framework or dependency
• make it simple : no complex business algorithm

The application works with GlassFish and JBoss today and there are plans to add support for TomEE.

Download the source code from github.com/agoncal/agoncal-application-petstore-ee6. And feel free to fork if you want to use a fancy toolkit as the front-end or show some nicer back-end integration.

Some other sources of similar end-to-end applications are:
Java EE 6 Tutorial
Java EE 6 Galleria
Java EE 6 Hands-on Lab

Tuesday Oct 04, 2011

Welcoming WebSphere CE and Apache TomEE as new Java EE 6 citizens!

It's spring time for Java EE 6 with an ever growing list of certified implementations.

New additions to the list include IBM's WebSphere CE (an long time Java EE server) and the more surprising Apache TomEE product implementing the Java EE 6 Web Profile (see announcement on the Apache blog).

With Caucho's earlier certification, we have now two new licensees achieving compatibility and a total of 9 Java EE 6 certified configurations.

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As always, you can get the detailed certified configuration : WebSphere CE and TomEE. Other than the operating systems, databases and JVMs used you can also see which implementations were used for the various Java EE JSRs.