Tuesday Mar 31, 2015

Java EE @ Devoxx France

Devoxx France will take place next week in Paris. And this year, the most popular French Java conference is moving to a newer (and larger) venue: Palais des Congrés!

The overall conference agenda is impressive but Java EE obviously well covered (see the overview below). Personally, I will co-host with Roberto Cortez a session and a Hands-on lab on the Batch API (JSR 352).  I also have another regular conference session where I will talk about Java EE 8. Last but not least, I will also participate in the Java EE BoF with Antoine Sabot-Durand, Antonio Goncalves and Emmanuel Bernard.

Finally, I will also host a (late!) BoF around one of my hobby: Home Automation and Java. Despite this, this BoF is clearly not about Java EE. The idea is to gather interested people and have informal discussions around anything related to Home Automation and Java (KNX, Z-Wave, Nest, etc.). 

Friday Mar 27, 2015

JavaOne CFP is Open - Your Invitation to Submit to the Java EE Track

It's that special time of the year again - the JavaOne 2015 call for papers is now officially open!

JavaOne will be held October 25 - October 29 in San Francisco. You can read about the details and submit here (at the time of writing the site has some minor inconsistencies that is being fixed as we speak - generally you can trust the accuracy of the information in this post when in doubt). This year I have the privilege to lead the Java EE track again along with veteran track lead Lance Andersen. My colleagues Bruno Borges and David Delabassee will also be playing key roles in the Java EE track.

Please do consider this a personal invitation from me to submit your best ideas to one of the most prestigious gatherings of the minds for server-side Java. If you have any questions, never hesitate to get in touch. If your submission was not accepted the previous years please consider this encouragement to try to improve it and submit again.

Consider the following as inspiration for submissions to the Java EE track (the only real limits of course are your own imagination on anything in the Java EE ecosystem):

  • Existing and upcoming Java EE technology JSRs and implementations
  • Cool stuff that extends Java EE in new and interesting ways
  • Case studies using Java EE 5, Java EE 6 or Java EE 7 (including migration from other technologies)
  • Best practices and design patterns for using Java EE technologies
  • Emerging trends closely relevant to the Java EE ecosystem such as HTTP 2, microservices, reactive and the like
  • Insightful research, development and analysis work in server-side Java

Note that topics like IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, elasticity, multitenancy, NoSQL, Big Data, DevOps and the like should go on the cloud track instead of the Java EE track. Do make an honest effort in applying your judgement on which track to submit on. Either way, it's not a deal breaker if you don't get it exactly right - we will figure it out for you if all else fails :-).

The CFP is closed April 29, so please do start thinking about what you want to submit very soon (note that's a very short time frame - just about a month from now). That being said do take your time - quality always matters!

Wednesday Mar 25, 2015

Forge Powered Java EE Rapid Application Development Comes to NetBeans!

Forge has been a great tool for Rapid Application Development (RAD) with Java EE (for sake of nostalgia it is basically the descendant of the awesome seam-gen tool of the Java EE 5 era). As powerful as Forge is, one of it's drawbacks had been that it is very heavily command-line driven with many commands and sub-commands to learn. As a result it can be initially unnatural for the Average Joe, very IDE centric Java developer to pick up.

A novel solution to this paradigm mismatch that the Forge team adopted is to integrate Forge into IDEs like Eclipse. I am very happy to report that such integration has finally arrived in NetBeans, perhaps making it truly accessible to the core Java EE community. Indeed the Forge NetBeans integration works out very nicely - you access Forge commands through NetBeans quick search, the otherwise CLI driven commands are rendered dynamically as regular NetBeans wizards and the commands take effect seamlessly within NetBeans including generating code and running the project. In this case, a video really is worth a thousand words (if you are having trouble viewing the embedded video below it is available here). In addition to demonstrating Forge in NetBeans the video is really a great reflection of the kind of productivity you can achieve with Java EE today.

The Forge NetBeans plugin can be installed directly from within NetBeans by using the Plugin Portal Update Center (Tools -> Plugins). You can also download it manually from the NetBeans Plugin Portal.

If you are new to Forge, the Forge site has excellent documentation for getting started including a great self-paced, self-directed hands-on lab. Enjoy - Forge really can make web development fun again and NetBeans + Forge is a truly powerful combination that's hard to beat :-).

Monday Mar 16, 2015

Migrating a JSF Application from Spring to Java EE 7/CDI

One of the most important things to do at this stage of the life-cycle of Java EE is highlight successful adoption stories. We have been doing just that for a long time through our adoption stories blog as well as JavaOne. JavaOne 2014 was particularly good in this regard and JavaOne 2015 looks to be even better. Indeed we hope the folks with great adoption stories that submitted last year but did not get accepted will resubmit next year. We will continue to highlight some of those sessions from JavaOne 2014 in the next few months. In this vein I'd like to highlight a very interesting real world story of migrating a JSF based web application from Spring to Java EE 7 and CDI shared by Mario-Leander Reimer of QAware.

Mario's division is a small German based project consulting practice. He was tasked by a major German auto manufacturer to undertake this migration effort (it won't take most Germans much effort to figure out who this auto manufacturer might be since Mario shares that they are based in Munich). The reasons cited for the migration include streamlining/simplifying company-wide application architecture, reducing framework explosion/dependencies, standardization and reducing cost. In just about a month Mario was able to successfully migrate over the application that made extensive long-term use of Spring to CDI and Java EE 7! Mario also made use of great CDI ecosystem tools such as DeltaSpike and Arquillian (both projects have been Duke's Choice award winners, DeltaSpike being the more recent recipient). He also used PrimeFaces with JSF.

During his talk Mario highlighted his journey in learning CDI/Java EE 7 (he was previously a heavy Spring user), the parts of CDI and Java EE he really came to appreciate as well as the challenges he faced and successfully overcame. His talk highlights the ever careful balance struck between feature bloat and simplicity in a Java EE standard like CDI as well as the power of the CDI portable extensions API when you really need to break out of what CDI provides out-of-the-box. You can see Mario's awesome JavaOne 2014 presentation below (if you are having trouble seeing the embedded video it is available here).

If you have a similarly great Java EE adoption story to share, please do drop us a note (particularly migration stories from other technologies). In the spirit of Java EE centric vendor neutrality, what Java EE implementation or tool set you choose does not matter at all and neither does which part of the globe you are in.

Tuesday Feb 24, 2015

JavaOne Replay: 'Java EE Game Changers'

David Blevins is a frenetic actor in the overall Java EE Ecosystem. Over the years, he has been involved in various open source Java EE related projects (e.g. OpenEJB). David is now actively working on TomEE which he launched in 2011. So it is fair to say that David knows what implementing Java EE means.

In addition, David is involved in different JCP Expert Groups where he is helping to shape the future versions of Java EE. So David has multiple hats: implementor, contributor and active participant in different EGs.

In this JavaOne session, David is sharing, in a technical (and non traditional) way, his enthusiasm about Java EE and the JCP. In his 'Java EE Game Changers' talk, David looks back at Java EE, he discusses some aspects that have changed the way we program Java EE applications. David also talks about points such as testability in Java EE. Finally, David is also sharing some of the ideas he is pushing forward, through his involvement in the JCP, to improve Java EE (e.g. MDB replacement in JMS 2.1).

This is great session to watch! This talk is also highly recommended to anyone who still has doubts about the Java EE Platform! The only grief one could do about this session is that one hour is too short for such an enthusiast and knowledgable speaker!

Monday Feb 23, 2015

Rakuten: Java EE Adoption in One of the World’s Largest Online Financial Systems

One of the most important things to do at this stage of the life-cycle of Java EE is highlight successful adoption stories. We have been doing just that for a long time through our adoption stories blog as well as JavaOne. JavaOne 2014 was particularly good in this regard and JavaOne 2015 looks to be even better. Indeed we hope the folks with great adoption stories that submitted last year but did not get accepted will resubmit next year. We will highlight some of those sessions from JavaOne 2014 in the next few months and the best place to start is the Java EE adoption story from Rakuten.

Rakuten is one of the largest online financial systems in the world. It is the number one e-commerce platform in Japan generating over 51 billion dollars of yearly revenue and growing on a global scale. It is easily one of the most technically adept companies in Japan and perhaps the world. They had a legacy system build around J2EE and a hodgepodge of various non-standard frameworks such as Spring, Apache Axis and iBatis. They chose to adopt Java EE over these technologies including alternatives such as .NET. They cited vendor neutrality, choice, simplicity, community, ease-of-learning, ease-of-use and productivity as great reasons for selecting Java EE for their next generation platform. They fully leverage Java EE including key APIs such as JSF, CDI, EJB, JPA, JTA and JMS. Along with Java EE they also chose WebLogic as well as Oracle DB/Exadata. They cited performance, scalability, reliability, productivity and support for choosing WebLogic, Oracle DB and Exadata. They also use best-of-breed tools such as NetBeans, Maven, Jenkins and the Atlassian suite of solutions. They achieved the astounding technical feat of completely overhauling their 24/7, extremely high volume online transactional system in just six months including training!

You can see Hirofumi Iwasaki and Arshal Ameen's awesome JavaOne 2014 presentation below (if you are having trouble seeing the embedded video it is available here).

The slide deck from the talk is posted below (if you are having trouble seeing the embedded slideshow it is available here).

Hirofumi Iwasaki and Arshal Ameen have been great advocates of Java EE, especially in Japan. We hope to continue to see great things from them and Rakuten. Rakuten is looking forward to learning and applying Java EE 7 in the real world as soon as possible.

If you have a great Java EE adoption story to share, please do drop us a note (particularly migration stories from other technologies). In the spirit of Java EE centric vendor neutrality, what Java EE implementation or tool set you choose does not matter at all and neither does which part of the globe you are in.

Friday Feb 13, 2015

The JavaOne 2014 Rock Stars are Here!

The JavaOne team just announced the Rock Star speakers for JavaOne 2014. Not very surprisingly Java EE had a strong showing. That's very significant as the Rock Stars are based on attendee ratings. I am extremely humbled to join the very fortunate ranks this year. Having an insider view of JavaOne, I know exactly how selective JavaOne really is (it is by far the most selective Java conference in the world). For that reason to me every speaker at JavaOne is a star on their own right. The Rock Star awards are just an attempt to recognize the talent and hard work of some of these people using some set of objective criteria.

Here are the Java EE Rock Star speakers and their highly rated talks (linked are the videos):

You can find the full list of Rock Star speakers and their talks here. Who knows, maybe you join these ranks next year?

Tuesday Feb 10, 2015

Java EE 7 Maintenance Release

The Java EE 7 specification (JSR 342) was finalised end of May 2013 and since then, various minors errors have been reported. Those will soon be addressed as the Java EE 7 specification will go through a maintenance release (see Linda's announcement here).

You can check the proposed changes here and a draft of the specification with the proposed changes incorporated here.

Those proposed corrections should only impact the specification document itself and not the Reference Implementation nor the TCK. So once this MR will be done and voted, the version of the specification should be Java EE 7 Rev A.

Thursday Feb 05, 2015

MongoDB as a Glassfish Security Realm

As many of you know application servers like GlassFish have excellent built-in support for common authentication providers like a database or LDAP. Using these as security realms is typically just as simple as a few clicks on an admin console UI or a command (or two) using the admin CLI. But what if your authentication storage mechanism is a little more exotic? How about something really exotic like the popular MongoDB NoSQL database? Is there a way to make it work with GlassFish/Java EE security?

Not to worry - in that case you are looking at creating a custom JAAS based authentication module, configuring it with GlassFish and using it as a Java EE security realm instead of using one of the built-in choices. It's really not as scary as it sounds - Lee Chuk Munn from the Advanced Technology Applications Practice for the National University of Singapore, Institute of Systems Science shows us exactly how to do it, step-by-step. In a characteristically awesome blog post, he explains the basics of GlassFish security realms, creating a JAAS based custom authentication module for MongoDB, registering the module as a security realm and using it. Enjoy!

Wednesday Feb 04, 2015

Java EE MVC to be Based on JAX-RS

One of the key Java EE 8 APIs, MVC 1.0 (JSR 371) is solidly moving forward. A key decision for the expert group to consider was whether to base the specification on Servlet or JAX-RS. MVC clearly has many semantic commonalities with both specifications such as HTTP method mapping, mime-type handling, session/request/cookie manipulation and so on. Specifications like JSF and JAX-RS are based on Servlet so it is not unnatural to base MVC on the foundational Java EE specification too. However basing MVC on the lower level Servlet specification would likely mean introducing many APIs that are potential duplicates of what is already available in the higher level JAX-RS API. On the other hand basing MVC on JAX-RS would mean significantly minimizing the possibility of API duplication. It would also mean the programming model between JAX-RS and MVC would be very similar, reducing the learning curve for both newcomers and experienced Java EE developers.

For these reasons it is not too surprising that the expert group has decided to move ahead by basing MVC on JAX-RS. MVC expert group member Ivar Grimstad shares the details including an early view on how the API may wind up looking like in a recent post. Do you have an opinion to share on this?

Monday Feb 02, 2015

CDI and DeltaSpike Overview by CDI Specification Lead

For those of us that have been using CDI for a while it's easy to forget that basic refreshers are extremely valuable for newcomers. Fortunately this point is not lost on current CDI specification lead Antoine Sabot-Durand. He recently finished presenting a three-part webinar covering CDI and DeltaSpike.

In the first of these webinars Antoine covered the very basics of CDI (along with some advanced features). The slides are here and the video is below:

In the second webinar in the sequence Antoine covered a few more advanced features, most notably CDI portable extensions. The slides are here and the video is below:

In the third webinar installment Antoine gave a basic overview of DeltaSpike. DeltaSpike is a very handy set of CDI plugins that all Java EE developers should we aware of. DeltaSpike very deservedly won the Duke's Choice Award for 2014. The slides are here and the video is below:

You should also check out Antoine's more forward looking JavaOne 2014 talk on CDI 2 posted here.

Tuesday Jan 27, 2015

JMS 2.0 Errata - Public Review has now started!

As announced a few weeks ago, the JMS 2.0 specification (JSR 343) is going through a simple update process, i.e. an errata update. An errata is a simple kind of maintenance release intended purely to correct errors in the specification. The draft of this effort has just been published by the JCP (see Change Log and Issue List here) for a formal maintenance review period that will close on February 21st. That means that you have a little bit more than 3 weeks to submit your comments (see here). After that, the JMS 2.0 errata will go the JCP executive committee for ballot approval. Once 'JMS 2.0 Rev. A' is approved, the actual (and technical) work on JMS 2.1 (JSR 386) will start.

Monday Jan 26, 2015

DDD (Domain-Driven Design) + Java EE "Hanginar" on Thursday

My former colleague at Oracle and fellow Java EE advocate Arun Gupta has been up to something pretty cool - what he calls "Java EE Hanginars". The idea is essentially to have a series of webinars on various Java EE topics using Google Hangout. The format is also a bit different - the idea is to be more code and Q & A centric rather than lecture centric. He gathers a set of questions from the community on the topic before the webinar for live discussion. Thus far he has had good success covering a number of topics including Hibernate OGM, OSGi, jOOQ and CI/CD using Java EE. You can find all of the webinars thus far here. For the fifth webinar in the series, it's now my turn :-).

I'll be talking about a topic that's been near and dear to me as a former Java EE architect/consultant for a while - Java EE and DDD (Domain-Driven Design). The Java EE part is probably obvious to most of you, but the DDD part may or may not be. DDD is an architectural style that strongly emphasizes reflecting the business domain in software development. Though there are some superficial similarities with the classical J2EE design patterns, in my view DDD is a cleaner, more modern and more OO centric design paradigm. Interestingly DDD concepts like the bounded context are becoming increasing important in determining sensible application partitioning amongst the microservices hype of the day. I think Java EE is actually an excellent fit for DDD (and vice versa). To demonstrate how marrying Java EE and DDD is done, I started a small side project a few years ago at Oracle named Cargo Tracker. As a nice (somewhat intended) side-effect the project is actually a good non-trivial example of a working Java EE (7) application. Do feel free to check out the linked site if this intrigues you.

During the webinar, I hope to go over a little bit of the very basics of DDD, demo cargo tracker, show some key code and answer questions. If so inclined, you could add your own questions here. The webinar will start a few minutes before 10 AM Pacific Time (PT) on Thursday January 29th. You should join live here. Hope to see you there?

Please note that any views expressed here are my own only and certainly does not reflect the position of Oracle as a company.

Friday Jan 23, 2015

Vaadin, CDI and Java EE

While some people miss this point, one of the key goals of introducing CDI into Java EE was to easily enable integrating solutions outside the standard into the platform. I was recently reminded of this myself when I saw the announcement that Vaadin now officially supports CDI and Java EE.

Vaadin has long been a very compelling GWT based Java web framework. Although it lags behind the likes of JSF and Spring MVC in terms of adoption, it is extremely polished, it is very much aligned with the Java EE design philosophy and it has a very strong following that hasn't dissipated even with the rise of HTML 5 and JavaScript frameworks. Some folks have been using Vaadin with Java EE for a while using CDI as glue. I am glad both CDI and Java EE (including Java EE 7) is now officially supported by the Vaadin team itself. Like everything else Vaadin, the Java EE/CDI integration is extremely polished with a very nice tutorial explaining the features (see the link above). Another very good resource to get started with Java EE 7, CDI and Vaadin is the YouTube video below featuring Geertjan Wielenga of the NetBeans team and Matti Tahvonen of Vaadin. They use GlassFish and NetBeans for the demo.

Another great GWT based Java web framework worth checking out that works with CDI and Java EE is Errai.

Friday Dec 12, 2014

Season's Greetings and Happy New Year from the GlassFish/Java EE Team!

On behalf of the GlassFish and Java EE team at Oracle I wish you and your family Season's Greetings and a very Happy New Year!

I am very happy to say this has been yet another busy and eventful year for us. We finished the community survey effort to help drive the agenda for Java EE 8 and GlassFish 5; we released GlassFish 4.1 with support for Java EE 7, CDI 1.2, WebSocket 1.1 and Java SE 8; we released WebLogic 12.1.3 with support for WebSocket, JSON-P, JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1 and Java SE 8; we officially launched the Java EE 8 JSRs; we are now in the process of spinning up Adopt-a-JSR for Java EE 8. We are ever thankful for your support and we hope to continue to try our best to serve your interests, perhaps against what many would consider pretty tall odds.

In the coming year, we will look forward to working harder than ever in engaging you through our development and evangelism efforts including this humble community blog. We hope the next year will bring a far more concrete vision of Java EE 8, some early work on GlassFish 5 and a fully Java EE 7 capable version of the best-in-class WebLogic commercial offering. We will also continue our work to strengthen the broader Java EE community and align the platform with emergent forces the likes of Java SE 8, HTTP 2, JavaScript/HTML5, Reactive Programming, Microservices, Docker, Big Data and the Cloud.

As you know, I and my colleague David Delabassee are the primary maintainers of this blog with some occasional help from folks like Bruno Borges and John Clingan. Both David and I will be enjoying some well-earned time-off with our families the next few weeks. As a result the guns will be mostly quiet at this particular Java bulwark to return recharged and full force in the new year. Others on our team will continue to work hard behind the scenes towards the goals stated.

Until then, thanks and best wishes once again. We hope to see you next year!