Monday Jul 27, 2015

Ivar Grimstad's Java EE Sessions at JavaOne 2015

For the Java EE track at JavaOne 2015 we are highlighting some key sessions and speakers to better inform you of what you can expect, right up until the start of the conference.

To this end we recently interviewed Ivar Grimstad. Ivar is a Java EE advocate, speaker, blogger and open source hacker. He is a part of the Java EE 8 MVC and Security JSRs. We wanted to talk to him about his two accepted sessions at JavaOne 2015, his expectations for JavaOne and his experiences in the JCP (click here if you can't see the embedded video):

The following are the sessions we talked about:

Besides Ivar's sessions, we have a very strong program for the Java EE track and JavaOne overall - just explore the content catalog. If you can't make it, you can be assured that we will make key content available after the conference just as we have always done.

Monday Jul 06, 2015

JavaOne 2015 Java EE Track Committee: Ryan Cuprak

This is the fourth and last in a series of interviews for you to meet some of the committee members for the JavaOne 2015 Java EE track. We will next move on to interviewing some of the key accepted speakers in the track this year.

The committee plays the most important part in determining the content for JavaOne. These good folks really deserve recognition as most of them devote many hours of their time helping move JavaOne forward, often as volunteers. If JavaOne matters to you, these are folks you should know about.

This last interview is with my good friend Ryan Cuprak. If you are having trouble seeing the embedded video below it is available here.

Ryan is the founder of the Connecticut JUG, author, blogger, speaker, JavaOne Rock Star and Java EE advocate. He is a senior manager at Dassault Systemes. Ryan is a brand new and welcome addition to the committee. In the interview he shares his experience and expectations for the Java EE track this year.

He also wrote up an excellent blog entry on his experience as a new committee member. He had some pretty good insights and very kind things to say about the process, JavaOne and Java EE that's worth a read.

On this note, I would like to make sure you know that the JavaOne content catalog is now already live with a few preliminary fairly obvious selections we were able to make. None of the sessions accepted at this stage are from Oracle speakers on our track. The folks that we selected early for acceptance include David Blevins, Jonathan Gallimore, Mohammed Taman, Rafael Benevides and Antoine Sabot-Durand. They will be talking about Java EE Connectors (JCA), Java EE 7 real world adoption, CDI and DeltaSpike. I would encourage you to check out all the early selections in the catalog. We are working to finalize the full catalog shortly.

I hope to see you at JavaOne. Do stay tuned for more interviews with some key speakers on our track.

Monday Jun 29, 2015

JavaOne 2015 Java EE Track Committee: Johan Vos

This is the third in a series of interviews for you to meet some of the committee members for the JavaOne 2015 Java EE track. The committee plays the most important part in determining the content for JavaOne. These good folks really deserve recognition as most of them devote many hours of their time helping move JavaOne forward, often as volunteers. If JavaOne matters to you, these are folks you should know about.

This interview is with Johan Vos. If you are having trouble seeing the embedded video below it is available here.

Johan is a Java Champion, author, speaker, blogger, member of the BeJUG steering group, member of the Devoxx steering group and a JCP member. He is a fan of Java EE, GlassFish and JavaFX. He founded LodgON, a company offering Java based solutions for social networking software. In the interview he shares his experience and expectations for the Java EE track this year.

On this note, I would like to make sure you know that the JavaOne content catalog is now already live with a few preliminary fairly obvious selections we were able to make. None of the sessions accepted at this stage are from Oracle speakers on our track. The folks that we selected early for acceptance include David Blevins, Jonathan Gallimore, Mohammed Taman, Rafael Benevides and Antoine Sabot-Durand. They will be talking about Java EE Connectors (JCA), Java EE 7 real world adoption, CDI and DeltaSpike. I would encourage you to check out all the early selections in the catalog. We are working to finalize the full catalog shortly.

I hope to see you at JavaOne. Do stay tuned for more interviews with committee members and some key speakers on our track.

Wednesday Jun 10, 2015

Meet the JavaOne Java EE Track Committee: David Heffelfinger

This is the second in a series of interviews for you to meet some of the committee members for the JavaOne 2015 Java EE track. The committee plays the most important part in determining the content for JavaOne. These good folks really deserve recognition as most of them devote many hours of their time helping move JavaOne forward, often as volunteers. If JavaOne matters to you, these are folks you should know about.

This interview is with David Heffelfinger. If you are having trouble seeing the embedded video below it is available here.

David is an independent consultant in the Washington DC metro area. He is a long time Java EE advocate, blogger, prolific author and speaker. We are proud to have him as a brand new addition to the committee this year. In the interview he shares his experience and expectations for the Java EE track this year.

On this note, I would like to make sure you know that the JavaOne content catalog is now already live with a few preliminary fairly obvious selections we were able to make. None of the sessions accepted at this stage are from Oracle speakers on our track. The folks that we selected early for acceptance include David Blevins, Jonathan Gallimore, Mohammed Taman, Rafael Benevides and Antoine Sabot-Durand. They will be talking about Java EE Connectors (JCA), Java EE 7 real world adoption, CDI and DeltaSpike. I would encourage you to check out all the early selections in the catalog. We are working to finalize the full catalog shortly.

I hope to see you at JavaOne. Do stay tuned for more interviews with committee members as well as some key speakers on our track.

Tuesday Jun 09, 2015

JSR 359: SIP Servlet 2.0

The reach of the Java EE Platform is not necessarily limited to 'traditional' Enterprise Applications. A good illustration of that is the SIP Servlet technology, which brings together the SIP programming model and the Java EE platform. SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) is a network signaling protocol, often used in the Telecommunication space, for creating and terminating sessions (e.g. VOIP sessions) with different participant(s).

A SIP Servlet is to SIP what a (traditional) Servlet is to HTTP, a server-side component managed by a container. A component developed using a Java API that interacts with clients by responding to incoming requests and returning corresponding responses. The SIP Servlet API (javax.servlet.sip) builds on the generic servlet API (javax.servlet) in much the same way as the HTTP Servlet API (javax.servlet.http) does. Given that, it is relatively easy to learn how to write SIP-based applications. A Converged Application is a (Telco oriented) application that spans multiple protocols (e.g. SIP, HTTP) and interfaces, such as Web, telephony, and other Java EE interfaces. A SIP container enables the development of applications that use SIP, HTTP Servlet API, and other Java EE APIs and components like JPA, JAX-RS, and messaging.

And like any major Java APIs, the SIP Servlet API is defined through the JCP.  The SIP Servlet specification has recently been updated, see JSR 359 here. To learn more about this, you might want to read the SIP Servlet Tutorial.

Friday Jun 05, 2015

Java EE 8 Roadmap Update

Java EE 8 was formally launched in September 2014 with the JCP’s unanimous approval of JSR 366 and our announcements at JavaOne.  At JavaOne 2014 we presented a summary of our areas of investigation for Java EE 8 during the Strategy Keynote, followed by numerous in-depth presentations on our intended work by the specification leads.  The goal that we set for ourselves then was to complete this work by JavaOne San Francisco 2016.

Although we all like to do (and hear) big things at JavaOne, the various latencies involved in launching expert groups as well as the other demands on the time of our spec leads has resulted in the date being pushed out a bit. We are strongly committed to transparency in our work on the Java EE Platform.  We are therefore publicly announcing that we are now changing our target time frame for the completion of this work to the first half of 2017.  We will be updating the target dates for the JSRs under the Java EE umbrella to reflect this change.

As a result of this shift, there is now more time and opportunity for YOU to get involved.  For example, the MVC  1.0 JSR has published their Early Draft Review, and the Java EE Security JSR will soon follow. We continue to encourage developers to track JSRs and provide feedback by viewing the individual JSR mailing lists, wikis, and download and try out early Java EE 8 reference implementation builds.  We've already seen a lot of interest not only in Java EE 8 features, but also in participation.  Many JUGs have been involved in adopting Java EE 8 and related JSRs, including the CJUGMorocco JUG, and a host of others.  Companies and individuals can get involved as well. For example, Serli, with a host of expertise in Java development, have contributed Application Versioning to GlassFish in the past, and are now signing up to contribute to the MVC reference implementation.

Start here and help define the future of Java EE! 

Friday May 29, 2015

Meet the JavaOne Java EE Track Committee: Markus Eisele

This is the first in a series of interviews for you to meet some of the committee members for the JavaOne 2015 Java EE track. The committee plays the most important part in determining the content for JavaOne. These good folks really deserve recognition as most of them devote many hours of their time helping move JavaOne forward, often as volunteers. If JavaOne matters to you, these are folks you should know about.

This first interview is with Markus Eisele. If you are having trouble seeing the embedded video below it is available here.

Markus is now a Developer Advocate at Red Hat and focuses on JBoss Middleware. He has been a long time community advocate for Java EE. He is a popular blogger, author, prolific speaker, JCP expert, Oracle recognized Java Champion and former Oracle ACE Director. He founded a successful German conference himself and helps organize a number of conferences worldwide. He has contributed as a JavaOne content committee member for a number of years. In the interview he shares his expectations for the Java EE track this year.

On this note, I would like to make sure you know that the JavaOne content catalog is now already live with a few preliminary fairly obvious selections we were able to make. None of the sessions accepted at this stage are from Oracle speakers on our track. The folks that we selected early for acceptance include David Blevins, Jonathan Gillmore, Mohammed Taman, Rafael Benevides and Antoine Sabot-Durand. They will be talking about Java EE Connectors (JCA), Java EE 7 real world adoption, CDI and DeltaSpike. I would encourage you to check out all the early selections in the catalog. I also want to remind you that you can still save money by registering early for JavaOne.

I hope to see you at JavaOne. Do stay tuned for more interviews with committee members as well as some key speakers on our track.  

Thursday May 28, 2015

AngularJS + CDI = AngularBeans

Even in the highly volatile world of JavaScript frameworks, AngularJS is still very clearly leading the pack. The good news for Java EE developers is that Java EE generally and Java EE 7 in particular works extremely well as a back-end for frameworks like AngularJS. To see why this is you need not look much farther than my talk on the topic and the corresponding example code (the code is deliberately self-contained with setup instructions so that you can explore it in detail on your own).

One of the drawbacks of the JavaScript rich client approach is that it often involves some boilerplate code that does not exist in server-side web frameworks due to the remote communication layer involved. To borrow concepts from the old J2EE design patterns, this boilerplate involves the creation and maintenance of DTOs (Data Transfer Objects) and remote proxies, not to mention the plumbing code necessary for the remote communication.  If you look carefully at my code example the boilerplate is not that hard to spot. One way of avoiding this boilerplate is a tight binding layer with the underlying back-end technology that automatically generates the DTO, remote proxy and remote plumbing parts. In the process the binding layer can bring a lot of back-end features forward to the client as well.

Fortunately for the Java EE ecosystem, my good friend Bessem Hmidi has formulated just such a solution focusing on CDI as the back-end component model. He has aptly named his project AngularBeans and first release is now on GitHub for everyone to use. His simple hello world example speaks volumes as to the power of this solution. Beyond simply removing boilerplate AngularBeans does far more (look at the GitHub page for full details):

  • Bean Validation on the client side
  • Built-in internationalization support from server-side property files
  • SockJS support
  • Server-side event binding

He has a more comprehensive example that demonstrates all the capabilities of AngularBeans. The project is at a very early stage, so this is a great time to get involved! In particular Bessem is looking to improve the project documentation.

On a slightly separate note, Bessem is the JUG leader of the ESPRIT JUG in Tunisia. He is one of the key Java EE advocates in North Africa, along with the likes of Egypt JUG leader Mohamed Taman. Bessem and I both very recently spoke at the inaugural Voxxed Days Algiers, Algeria (expect the trip report from that great event soon!).

Wednesday May 27, 2015

JavaOne Java EE Track: Saying Thanks and a Look at the Real Decision Makers

The JavaOne 2015 CFP is now closed. I want to thank all of those that submitted their thoughtful topics and all those who considered submitting. In the Java EE track we now have all the raw material we need to construct a strong selection. In the next few weeks we will be working hard with the review committee to carefully sort through all the submissions we have at hand.

I also want to take this opportunity to introduce you to the real decision makers in the track - the content selection committee members. The folks in the committee by far play the most important role in help shaping the track. This year on the track we are fortunate to have David Blevins, Cay Horstmann, Johan Vos, David Heffelfinger, Ryan Cuprak, Scott Sosna, Markus Eisele, Kevin Sutter, Linda DeMichiel, David Delabassee, Bruno Borges, and Harold Carr. You should get to know these folks if JavaOne is something you care about. I've posted their profiles on my personal blog. In the next few weeks, I plan to publish interviews with some of these folks through this humble blog.

Keep in mind that JavaOne is now already open for registration. I hope to see you all at JavaOne. In the meanwhile as always if you have any questions never hesitate to reach out.

Monday Apr 20, 2015

A Directory for CDI Plugins

One of the key goals of CDI was to significantly improve Java EE platform extensibility at the core component level. Generic dependency injection alone goes a long way in making it fairly easy to integrate third-party components and libraries. CDI goes much farther by offering an entire portable extension API geared specifically towards writing CDI plugins. The most obvious manifestation of a resulting CDI ecosystem is plug-in collection projects like Seam 3 and it's successor DeltaSpike. However, there is actually a lot more to the CDI ecosystem, most notably tools (think IDEs) and larger projects that offer CDI pluggability.

So far there has not been a concerted effort to create a directory of sorts for the CDI ecosystem. While such a directory will (hopefully) never be completely all-encompassing it is helpful to have one place you could go to in order to find out all the plugins available for CDI. Most recently the CDI specification site added an ecosystem section to try and address this need. The page is looking pretty good already including listings like DeltaSpike, VRaptor, Vaadin, Camel, Forge and Arquillian - you should check it out. I can already see a few missing though like MyBatis/CDI, Agorava, Struts 2/CDI, Wicket/CDI, ZK/CDI and a few more (I'll reach out to the CDI folks to see why these might be missing). If you similarly see any CDI plugins that should be listed, you should try and reach out (the top of the CDI ecosystem page says how you can do so).

Friday Apr 17, 2015

Java EE 7/Bean Validation Adoption at Harvard University

One of the most important things to do at this stage of the life-cycle of Java EE is highlight successful adoption stories. We have been doing just that for a long time through our adoption stories blog as well as JavaOne. JavaOne 2014 was particularly good in this regard and JavaOne 2015 looks to be even better. Indeed we hope the folks with great adoption stories that submitted last year but did not get accepted will resubmit next year. We will continue to highlight some of those sessions from JavaOne 2014 in the next few months. In this vein I'd like to highlight a very interesting real world story of practical usage of Bean Validation 1.1 in a Java EE 7 application at Harvard University.

Harvard University Institute for Quantitative Social Science's Dataverse application has been one of the earliest Java EE adoption use cases on GlassFish. They started with Java EE 5 and are now using Java EE 7 in the real world for a fairly complex application. The Dataverse application is an open platform for publishing, citing, analyzing, and preserving research data across universities. Although it started with Social Sciences, the application is now branching out to other fields such as Medicine and Astrophysics. The application makes full use of the Java EE stack including JSF and Bean Validation.

In their JavaOne 2014 talk project lead Gustavo Durand and senior developer Stephen Kraffmiller shared how they were sucessfully utilizing Bean validation in their Java EE 7 application. They shared some pretty advanced use cases and great practical insight. You can see their awesome JavaOne 2014 presentation below (if you are having trouble seeing the embedded video it is available here).

If you have a similarly great Java EE adoption story to share (particularly migration stories from other technologies), please do feel encouraged to share it through a JavaOne 2015 submission. The CFP deadline is April 29th, so you should hurry. In the spirit of Java EE centric vendor neutrality, what Java EE implementation or tool set you choose does not matter at all and neither does which part of the globe you are in.

Wednesday Apr 15, 2015

Last Call to Submit to the JavaOne Java EE Track

This is a first and last reminder from us to all of the folks out there that the JavaOne 2015 CFP closes on April 29 - just about two weeks from now.

The procrastinator in you might be thinking two weeks is plenty of time. In reality if you haven't started working on your submissions yet, you are probably setting yourself up for some stress that will likely result in a weak submission. This is especially true if like most of us you will need to collaborate with others or get your boss's approval for your submission. Putting things in perspective the CFP has already been open for about two weeks so other folks already have a head start to maximize their chances of getting accepted. We want to make sure everyone in the community has a fair chance to help us build a strong Java EE track agenda by submitting their best ideas. As always, never hesitate to get in touch if you have a question.

Consider the following as inspiration for submissions to the Java EE track (the only real limits of course are your own imagination on anything in the Java EE ecosystem):

  • Existing and upcoming Java EE technology JSRs and implementations
  • Cool stuff that extends Java EE in new and interesting ways
  • Case studies using Java EE 5, Java EE 6 or Java EE 7 (specially migration from other technologies)
  • Best practices and design patterns for using Java EE technologies
  • Emerging trends in the ecosystem such as HTTP2, HTML5 and microservices
  • Insightful research, development and analysis work in server-side Java

Fortunately or unfortunately some previous JavaOne CFPs have been extended beyond their initial date. Please do yourself a favor and don't assume this will happen again. You may be winding up denying yourself a shot at submitting your great talk altogether :-).

Finally, here is that all important link to the CFP. Hope to see and accept your great topic soon :-)?

Tuesday Mar 31, 2015

Java EE @ Devoxx France

Devoxx France will take place next week in Paris. And this year, the most popular French Java conference is moving to a newer (and larger) venue: Palais des Congrés!

The overall conference agenda is impressive but Java EE is obviously well covered (see the overview below). Personally, I will co-host with Roberto Cortez a session and a Hands-on lab on the Batch API (JSR 352).  I also have another regular conference session where I will talk about Java EE 8. Last but not least, I will also participate in the Java EE BoF with Antoine Sabot-Durand, Antonio Goncalves and Emmanuel Bernard.

Finally, I will also host a (late!) BoF around one of my hobby: Home Automation and Java. Despite this, this BoF is clearly not about Java EE. The idea is to gather interested people and have informal discussions around anything related to Home Automation and Java (KNX, Z-Wave, Nest, etc.). 

Friday Mar 27, 2015

JavaOne CFP is Open - Your Invitation to Submit to the Java EE Track

It's that special time of the year again - the JavaOne 2015 call for papers is now officially open!

JavaOne will be held October 25 - October 29 in San Francisco. You can read about the details and submit here (at the time of writing the site has some minor inconsistencies that is being fixed as we speak - generally you can trust the accuracy of the information in this post when in doubt). This year I have the privilege to lead the Java EE track again along with veteran track lead Lance Andersen. My colleagues Bruno Borges and David Delabassee will also be playing key roles in the Java EE track.

Please do consider this a personal invitation from me to submit your best ideas to one of the most prestigious gatherings of the minds for server-side Java. If you have any questions, never hesitate to get in touch. If your submission was not accepted the previous years please consider this encouragement to try to improve it and submit again.

Consider the following as inspiration for submissions to the Java EE track (the only real limits of course are your own imagination on anything in the Java EE ecosystem):

  • Existing and upcoming Java EE technology JSRs and implementations
  • Cool stuff that extends Java EE in new and interesting ways
  • Case studies using Java EE 5, Java EE 6 or Java EE 7 (including migration from other technologies)
  • Best practices and design patterns for using Java EE technologies
  • Emerging trends closely relevant to the Java EE ecosystem such as HTTP 2, microservices, reactive and the like
  • Insightful research, development and analysis work in server-side Java

Note that topics like IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, elasticity, multitenancy, NoSQL, Big Data, DevOps and the like should go on the cloud track instead of the Java EE track. Do make an honest effort in applying your judgement on which track to submit on. Either way, it's not a deal breaker if you don't get it exactly right - we will figure it out for you if all else fails :-).

The CFP is closed April 29, so please do start thinking about what you want to submit very soon (note that's a very short time frame - just about a month from now). That being said do take your time - quality always matters!

Wednesday Mar 25, 2015

Forge Powered Java EE Rapid Application Development Comes to NetBeans!

Forge has been a great tool for Rapid Application Development (RAD) with Java EE (for sake of nostalgia it is basically the descendant of the awesome seam-gen tool of the Java EE 5 era). As powerful as Forge is, one of it's drawbacks had been that it is very heavily command-line driven with many commands and sub-commands to learn. As a result it can be initially unnatural for the Average Joe, very IDE centric Java developer to pick up.

A novel solution to this paradigm mismatch that the Forge team adopted is to integrate Forge into IDEs like Eclipse. I am very happy to report that such integration has finally arrived in NetBeans, perhaps making it truly accessible to the core Java EE community. Indeed the Forge NetBeans integration works out very nicely - you access Forge commands through NetBeans quick search, the otherwise CLI driven commands are rendered dynamically as regular NetBeans wizards and the commands take effect seamlessly within NetBeans including generating code and running the project. In this case, a video really is worth a thousand words (if you are having trouble viewing the embedded video below it is available here). In addition to demonstrating Forge in NetBeans the video is really a great reflection of the kind of productivity you can achieve with Java EE today.

The Forge NetBeans plugin can be installed directly from within NetBeans by using the Plugin Portal Update Center (Tools -> Plugins). You can also download it manually from the NetBeans Plugin Portal.

If you are new to Forge, the Forge site has excellent documentation for getting started including a great self-paced, self-directed hands-on lab. Enjoy - Forge really can make web development fun again and NetBeans + Forge is a truly powerful combination that's hard to beat :-).