Monday Aug 24, 2015

Java API for JSON Binding (JSON-B) 1.0 Early Draft Now Available!

The first early draft of the Java API for JSON Binding (JSON-B) 1.0 is now available for you to review: https://jcp.org/aboutJava/communityprocess/edr/jsr367/index.html. As discussed below this is distinct from the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P) 1.1, which also recently published it's own first early draft. Like all early drafts for JSRs, the goal is to foster dialog, feedback and participation. Although it is just an early draft the thirty-five page specification document is actually fairly far along so providing useful feedback should be easy.

JSON is increasingly becoming the de-facto data interchange format on the web, be it for mobile, HTML5/JavaScript rich-client or microservices applications. While Jersey, EclipseLink, GlassFish and WebLogic have long provided strong support for JSON via EclipeLink MOXy, it has been a goal in the Java EE platform to make JSON a first class citizen to the degree where it can become just another natural serialization format for Java. Towards that goal Java EE 7 provided simple JSON processing support via JSON-P. That support is being beefed up further in Java EE 8 by supporting more JSON standards in JSON-P such as JSON Pointer, JSON-Patch and the like. As a parallel effort Java EE 8 also plans to provide a much higher level JSON binding API via JSON-B. The idea is to make JSON handling in the platform so ubiquitous and easy-to-use that it is almost invisible akin to JAXB in the XML world.

If these are ideas that interest you, now is the time to get involved with JSON-B and join other folks in the community that are already helping out. The JSON-B early draft gives special thanks to Olena Syrota, Oleg Tsal-Tsalko and the Ukraine JUG for their contributions even at this stage. These folks have helped us with feedback, community building as well as evangelizing.

There are many ways for you to get involved as always. You are always welcome to join the expert group proper via the JCP page for the specification. You can always simply join the discussion by subscribing to the JSON-B specification user alias. If you would rather participate as a group through your JUG you can do that easily via Adopt-a-JSR.

Wednesday Aug 19, 2015

Java EE @ Chicago Coder Conference 2015

The Chicago Coder Conference 2015 was held on May 14-15. The conference is locally organized by the community including the Chicago JUG, which is why it was important for us to support the event. The event is somewhat Java leaning but also has great presence from the web, .NET, database, etc communities.

I delivered talks on JMS 2 and aligning JavaScript/HTML5 with Java EE 7. Chicago based Java EE advocate Josh Juneau covered what's coming in Java EE 8. More details on the sessions and the trip to Turkey, including slide decks and code, posted on my personal blog.

Friday Jul 17, 2015

Using HTML 5 with JSF 2.2/Java EE 7

Though some people seem to continue to pit JSF against HTML 5, there is little practical reason this needs to be the case. In fact JSF 2.2 specifically and Java EE 7 generally has gone to great lengths to support the fellow HTML 5 body of standards.

It has always been fully possible to use native HTML in JSF pages. There is little reason you would have any practical difficulty in using most key HTML 5 features even with JSF 2.1/Java EE 6 including canvas, web workers, audio, video and local storage. The only clear place where JSF and HTML 5 can collide is while mixing and matching JSF features with newer input/data elements and attributes such as calendar, email, pattern, autofocus and placeholder. The JSF 2.2 expert group created a very novel and easy solution to this problem through pass-through elements and attributes. Using this feature you can start with an HTML 5 native element and add JSF features to it or start with a JSF element and add HTML 5 features to it seamlessly and effortlessly. By far the best write-up on this capability comes from Chicago based Java EE community advocate Josh Juneau. You should take time to read his very well written article published on OTN as well as the Java Magazine.

Washington DC based Java EE community advocate David Heffelfinger will tackle the topic of pushing HTML 5 usage to the max with JSF 2.2/Java EE 7 in his accepted JavaOne 2015 session titled Integrating JavaServer Faces and HTML5. If you can't come to JavaOne 2015 to see him in person we will share the session video with you on this humble blog when it becomes available.

Friday Feb 20, 2015

Java EE @ CodeMash 2015

CodeMash 2015 took place 6-9 January in Sandusky, Ohio at the exotic Kalahari Waterpark Resort. With another sold-out year, CodeMash is quickly becoming one of the larger developer conferences state-side. It has it's roots in .NET, but is making a concerted effort to better attract a Java audience. Topics covered included .NET, methodology, JavaScript/HTML, mobile, cloud, DevOps, Hadoop, NoSQL, Docker, Java SE and Java EE.

I delived sessions on aligning Java EE 7 with the JavaScript/HTML5 rich client landscape, reactive programming support in Java EE and what's coming in Java EE 8. More details on the sessions and CodeMash, including the slide decks and code, posted on my personal blog.

Wednesday Feb 11, 2015

Java EE @ Java2Days 2014

Java2Days 2014 was held on November 17-19 in Sofia, Bulgaria. It is far and away the largest Java conference in the Balkans region and now perhaps one of the most important conferences in Europe as a whole. This was another great year for this rapidly growing, vibrant event. It attracted a host of international and local speakers including Arun Gupta, Geertjan Wielenga, Roberto Cortez, Ivan St. Ivanov, Andy Gumbrecht and Andrew Lombardi. Topics included Java SE, Java EE, HTML5/JavaScript, mobile, OSGi, IoT and the cloud. I am extremely grateful that the organizers invited me again this year and very glad that I was able to accept.

Java EE had a strong showing this year:

  • What's Coming in Java EE 8 - me
  • Nuts and Bolts of WebSocket - Arun
  • Java EE 7 Hands-on Lab - Arun, Ivan and me
  • Apache Tomcat to Apache TomEE in 1-n Steps - Andy Gumbrecht
  • Java EE 7 Batch Processing in the Real World - Roberto and Ivan
  • Coding for Desktop and Mobile with HTML5 and Java EE 7 - Geertjan
  • JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients Using Java EE 7 - me, Ivan
  • Forge and Arquillian Hands-on Lab - Ivan, me
  • Why Open Standards and Java/EE Matter (to You) - me

More details on the sessions and Java2Days, including the slide decks, video and code, posted on my personal blog.

Wednesday Nov 12, 2014

Java EE @ NFJS Pacific Northwest Software Symposium Seattle

As some of you may be aware I recently joined the well-respected US based No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour. The NFJS Pacific Northwest Software Symposium was held October 17 - 19 in Seattle, Washington.

I had five talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. I did talks on Java EE 7/Java EE 8, the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints, JavaScript + Java EE, Java EE + NoSQL as well as WebSocket. More details, including slide decks and code as well as my NFJS tour schedule, posted on my personal blog.

Monday Nov 03, 2014

Java EE @ NFJS New England Software Symposium Boston

As some of you may be aware I recently joined the well-respected US based No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour. The NFJS New England Software Symposium was held September 19 - 21 in Boston. This is one of the larger NFJS shows and attendance at the show and my sessions was pretty good. It is always encouraging to see the same folks attend more than one talk. On my way to the show I also stopped by at the Connecticut Java User Group. The JUG is led by my friend and co-author for EJB 3 in Action Ryan Cuprak. I've spoken at the JUG a number of times over the years and it was good to be back.

I had five talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. I did talks on Java EE 7/Java EE 8, the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints, JavaScript + Java EE, Java EE + NoSQL as well as JMS 2. More details, including slide decks and code as well as my NFJS tour schedule, posted on my personal blog.

Wednesday Oct 29, 2014

Java EE @ NFJS Greater Atlanta Software Symposium

As some of you may be aware I recently joined the well-respected US based No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour. The NFJS Greater Atlanta Software Symposium was held September 12 - 14.

I had four talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. I did talks on Java EE 7/Java EE 8, WebSocket, the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints and JavaScript + Java EE. More details, including slide decks and code as well as my NFJS tour schedule, posted on my personal blog.

Friday Aug 22, 2014

Java EE @ NFJS Central Iowa Software Symposium Des Moines

As some of you may be aware I recently joined the well-respected US based No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour. The NFJS Central Iowa Software Symposium was held August 8 - 10 in Des Moines. The Des Moines show is one of the smaller ones but still was good overall. It is one of the few events of it's kind that take place this part the country so it is extremely important.

I had five talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. I had decent attendance for all my sessions and had many of the same folks staying for multiple sessions which is always a very good sign. I did talks on Java EE 7/Java EE 8, WebSocket, the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints, JavaScript + Java EE and NoSQL + Java EE. More details, including slide decks and code as well as my NFJS tour schedule, posted on my personal blog.

Tuesday Jul 01, 2014

Java EE @ Java Day Tokyo 2014

Java Day Tokyo 2014 was held on May 22nd. Organized by Oracle Japan, it is the largest Java developer event in the country. Indeed it is really a replacement to JavaOne Japan. This was another highly successful year for the event with a fully sold out venue packed with youthful, energetic developers. Speakers included Steve Chin, Stuart Marks, Simon Ritter, Nandini Ramani, Cameron Purdy and Yoshio Terada. Topics included Java SE, Java EE and JavaFX. Cameron Purdy, Vice President of Development at Oracle responsible for Java EE, shared the Java EE 8 road-map during the opening keynote.

I did talks on Java EE 7/Java EE 8 and aligning Java EE 7 with the HTML 5/JavaScript Rich Client landscape. There were many other very interesting Java EE related session in Japanese and English, including a Java EE adoption story from Rakuten. More details, including slide decks and code, posted on my personal blog.

Wednesday May 28, 2014

Adding SSE support in Java EE 8

SSE (Server-Sent Event) is a standard mechanism used to push, over HTTP, server notifications to clients.  SSE is often compared to WebSocket as they are both supported in HTML 5 and they both provide the server a way to push information to their clients but they are different too! See here for some of the pros and cons of using one or the other.

For REST application, SSE can be quite complementary as it offers an effective solution for a one-way publish-subscribe model, i.e. a REST client can 'subscribe' and get SSE based notifications from a REST endpoint. As a matter of fact, Jersey (JAX-RS Reference Implementation) already support SSE since quite some time (see the Jersey documentation for more details).

There might also be some cases where one might want to use SSE directly from the Servlet API. Sending SSE notifications using the Servlet API is relatively straight forward. To give you an idea, check here for 2 SSE examples based on the Servlet 3.1 API. 

We are thinking about adding SSE support in Java EE 8 but the question is where as there are several options, in the platform, where SSE could potentially be supported:
  • the Servlet API
  • the WebSocket API
  • JAX-RS
  • or even having a dedicated SSE API, and thus a dedicated JSR too!
Santiago Pericas-Geertsen (JAX-RS Co-Spec Lead) conducted an initial investigation around that question. You can find the arguments for the different options and Santiago's findings here.

So at this stage JAX-RS seems to be a good choice to support SSE in Java EE. This will obviously be discussed in the respective JCP Expert Groups but what is your opinion on this question?

Friday Dec 20, 2013

Server Sent Events (SSE) in Glassfish/Jersey

As you know, HTTP is a stateless protocol. For most use cases in the enterprise, the statelessness of HTTP is a huge boon for scalability - a benefit that is also extended to REST. However, there is a certain class of arguably emerging use cases for which the stateless nature of HTTP is actually a scalability challenge. These use cases require the bidirectional, full-duplex, asynchronous characteristics of stateful protocols such as TCP. Examples include chat-like online collaboration, stock-ticker like command-control/monitoring, online gaming and the like. WebSocket (and the Java API for WebSocket newly included in Java EE 7 :-)) is ideal for these cases. Between the seemingly diametric opposites of plain HTTP and WebSocket, there's also Server Sent Events (SSE). SSE is aimed at yet another scenario - a steam of events generated by the server and consumed passively by the client. Although not standardized in JAX-RS 2/Java EE 7, Jersey/GlassFish includes support for SSE.

In an very detailed blog post, Rahman Usta of the Istanbul JUG explains SSE and demonstrates a non-trivial use of the Jersey/GlassFish support for SSE.

Thursday Feb 28, 2013

Ashwin Rao on HTML5/NetBeans 7.3

As you may know, NetBeans 7.3 is creating quite a buzz in the community. The 122th episode of the Java Spotlight podcast features an interview with NetBeans Group Product Manager Ashwin Rao. Although he generally keeps a pretty low profile, Ashwin is one of the key folks driving NetBeans forward. He talks with Roger Brinkley about the HTML 5 landscape, the new features in NetBeans such as excellent JavaScript editing capabilities powered by the Nashorn engine on par with the Java editor, support for JavaScipt/HTML 5 frameworks like JQuery, AngularJS and backbone.js as well as enhanced browser integration.

 

 

The podcast also covers Java SE 6, Java EE 7, JavaFX and JavaOne India. You can listen to the full podcast here. If you are hungry to learn more about NetBeans 7.3 after you listen to the podcast, you can check out the list of new features and a cool video on the release.

Wednesday Oct 03, 2012

JavaOne: Parleys.com, Spring Vs. Java EE and HTML5 tooling

Parleys.com, a 2012 Duke's Choice Award winner, is an E-Learning platform that host content from different sources (conferences, JUGs meetings, etc.). There is a lot of technical content available for online but also offline consumption, including many sessions on Java EE. Parleys has just released, for free, all the Devoxx 2011 sessions (video and slides sync'ed!).

From a technical point of view, Parleys.com is interesting as they have switched from Spring to Java EE 6 to avoid being locked in a proprietary framework. During the GlassFish Community BoF, Stephan Janssen (Parleys.com and Devoxx founder) also presented how GlassFish is used to support 2000 concurrent Parleys users over a cluster of 2 GlassFish instances.


Talking about Java EE and/or Spring, Harshad Oak has posted an update on the 'Spring Vs. Java EE' panel discussion that took place on Tuesday. As Arun said standards such as Java EE does not necessarily refrain innovation: "JBoss Forge & Arquillian from RedHat are great examples of innovation in the JavaEE community. Standardization is important but innovation does continue even within that framework."


Simplicity, productivity along with HTML5 are the driving themes of Java EE 7. In terms of simplicity and productivity, the developer experience can also be improved by the tooling. Every NetBeans release comes with a large set of improvements, the just released NetBeans 7.3 beta is no exception.
The goal of ‘NB 7.3’s Project Easel’ is to improve HTML5 development, something that will be handy for Java EE 7 developers. Project Easel can, for example, communicate directly to Chrome's WebKit engine, this feature was shown during Sunday's Technical Keynote at the end of the Java EE section. In this beta release, Chrome and the embedded JavaFX browser are the only supported browsers but the NetBeans team plan to add support, over time, for other WebKit based browsers.


Today (i.e. Wednesday 3rd) is also the final exhibition day, so make sure to visit the Java EE and the GlassFish pods on the Java DEMOgrounds (Hilton Grand Ballroom, 9:30 am - 5:00 pm).
Finally, here are some Java EE and GlassFish related activities worth attending today if you are at JavaOne :
Wednesday October 3rd
Time Title Location
8:30-9:30am What's New in Servlet 3.1: An Overview Parc 55 Mission
8:30-9:30am Bean Validation 1.1: What's New Under the Hood Parc 55
Cyril Magnin II/III
10:00-11:00am JSR 353: Java API for JSON Processing Parc 55 Mission
10:00-12:00pm Tutorial : Integrating Your Service into the GlassFish PaaS Platform Parc 55 Devisidero
11:30-12:30pm What's New in JSF: A Complete Tour of JSF 2.2 Parc 55
Cyril Magnin I
11:30-12:30pm Best of Both Worlds: Java Persistence with NoSQL and SQL Parc 55 Mission
1:00-2:00pm Sharding Middleware to Achieve Elasticity and High Availability in the Cloud Parc 55
Market Street
1:00-2:00pm Pimp My RESTful Java Applications Parc 55
Cyril Magnin I
3:00-4:00pm Migrating Spring to Java EE Parc 55
Cyril Magnin II/III
4:30-5:30pm JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond Parc 55
Cyril Magnin II/III
4:30-5:30pm HTML5 WebSocket and Java Parc 55
Cyril Magnin I
4:30-5:30pm Easy Middleware for Your Embedded Device Nikko Ballroom II/III

Monday Oct 01, 2012

The first day of JavaOne is already over!

In the past Sunday used to be a more relaxing day with ‘just’ some JavaOne activities going on. Sunday used to be a soft day to prepare yourself for an exhausting week. This is now over as JavaOne is expanding; Sunday is now an integral part of the conference. One of the side effect of this extra day is that some activities related to JavaOne and OpenWorld such as MySQL Connect are being push to start a day earlier on Saturday (can you spot the pattern here?).

On the GlassFish front, Sunday was a very busy day! It started at the Moscone Center with the annual GlassFish Community Event where the Java EE 7 and GF 4 roadmaps were presented and discussed. During the event, different GlassFish users such as ZeroTurnaround (the JRebel guys), Grupo RBS and IDR Solutions shared their views on GF, why they like GF but also what could be improved. The event was also a forum for the GF community to exchange with some of the key Java EE / GlassFish Oracle Executives and the different GF team members.

The Java Strategy Keynote and the JavaOne Technical Keynote were held in the Masonic Auditorium later in the after-noon. Oracle executives have presented the plans for Java SE, Java FX and Java EE. Here are some personal takeaways from those keynotes.

Modularity
Modularity is a big deal. We know by now that Project Jigsaw will not be ready for Java SE 8 but in any case, it is already possible (and encouraged) to test Jigsaw today.
In the future, Java EE plan to rely on the modularity features provided by Java SE, so Project Jigsaw is also relevant for Java EE developers.
Shorter term, to cover some of the modular requirements, Java SE will adopt the approach that was used for Java EE 6 and the notion of Profiles. This approach does not define a module system per say; Profiles is a way to clearly define different subsets of Java SE to fulfill different needs (e.g. the full JRE is not required for a headless application). The introduction of different Profiles, from the Base profile (10mb) to the Full Profile (+50mb), has been proposed for Java SE 8.

Embedded
Embedded is a strong theme going forward for the Java Plaform. There is now a dedicated program : Java Embedded @ JavaOne

Java by nature (e.g. platform independence, built-in security, ability easily talks to any back-end systems, large set of skills available on the market, etc.) is probably the most suited platform for the Internet of Things.

You can quickly be up-to-speed and develop services and applications for that space just by using your current Java skills. All you need to start developing on ARM is a 35$ Raspberry Pi ARM board (25$ if you are cheap and can live without an ethernet connection) and the recently released JDK for Linux/ARM. Obviously, GlassFish runs on Raspberry Pi.

If you wan to go further in the embedded space, you should take a look Java SE Embedded, an optimized, low footprint, Java environment that support the major embedded architectures (ARM, PPC and x86).

Finally, Oracle has recently introduced Java Embedded Suite, a new solution that brings modern middleware capabilities to the embedded space. Java Embedded Suite is an optimized solution that leverage Java SE Embedded but also GlassFish, Jersey and JavaDB to deploy advanced value added capabilities (eg. sensor data filtering and) deeper in the network, closer to the devices.

JavaFX
JavaFX is going strong! Starting from Java SE 7u6, JavaFX is bundled with the JDK. JavaFX is now available for all the major desktop platforms (Windows, Linux and Mac OS X). JavaFX is now also available, in developer preview, for low end device running Linux/ARM. During the keynote, JavaFX was shown running on a Raspberry Pi!

And as announced during the keynote, JavaFX should be fully open-sourced by the end of the year; contributions are welcome!.

There is a strong momentum around JavaFX, it’s the ideal client solution for the Java platform. A client layer that works perfectly with GlassFish on the back-end. If you were not convince by JavaFX, it’s time to reconsider it!

As an old Chinese proverb say “One tweet is worth a thousand words!”

HTML5, Project Avatar and Java EE 7
HTML5 got a lot of airtime too, it was covered during the Java EE 7 section of the keynote. Some details about Project Avatar, Oracle’s incubator project for a TSA (Thin Server Architecture) solution, were diluted and shown during the keynote.

On the tooling side, Project Easel running on NetBeans 7.3 beta was demo’ed, including a cool NetBeans debugging session running in Chrome!

HTML 5, Project Avatar and Java EE 7 deserve separate posts...

Feedback
We need your feedback! There are many projects, JSRs and products cooking : GlassFish 4, Project Jigsaw, Concurrency Utilities for Java EE (JSR 236), OpenJFX, OpenJDK to name just a few. Those projects, those specifications will have a profound impact on the Java platform for the years to come! So if you have the opportunity, download, install, learn, tests them and give feedback! Remember, you can "Make the Future Java!"


Finally, the traditional GlassFish Party at the Thirsty Bear concluded the first JavaOne day. This party is another place where the community can freely exchange with the GlassFish team in a more relaxed, more friendly (but sometime more noisy) atmosphere. Arun has posted a set of pictures to reflect the atmosphere of the keynotes and the GlassFish party.


You can find more details on the others Java EE and GlassFish activities here.