Thursday Apr 17, 2014

GlassFish Story by Rakuten/Makito Hashiyama

Rakuten is one of the largest e-commerce platforms in Japan and perhaps the world. They chose GlassFish to form a core of their extensive (24 X 7) platform. Makito Hashiyama, the lead for the Rakuten marketplace platform shared their adoption story at the JavaOne 2013 Sunday GlassFish community event - check out the video below:

Makito detailed how GlassFish enabled Rakuten to handle the peak load of one of the biggest online sales events in Japan. By tuning GlassFish worker threads on a (42 X 3) instance cluster Rakuten was able to process 12,000 transactions per minute despite having a high latency external system dependency. Makito mentioned that one of the key reasons Rakuten adopted GlassFish for their platform was because of early support for Java EE standards such as JAX-WS. He also mentioned that beyond simply using GlassFish Rakuten regularly contributes patches into the GlassFish code base. You can check out the details of his story on the GlassFish stories blog.

Do you have a Java EE/GlassFish adoption story to share? Let us know and we will highlight it for the community.

Monday Apr 14, 2014

David Heffelfinger's Java EE/GlassFish Adoption Story

David Heffelfinger is the Chief Technology Officer of Ensode Technology and an ardent US based Java EE/GlassFish advocate. He has authored no less than four titles on Java EE/GlassFish. David shared a Java EE/GlassFish adoption story at the JavaOne 2013 Sunday GlassFish community event - check out the video below:

He detailed how he convinced a long time customer to upgrade their application servers and use Java EE/GlassFish with PrimeFaces by hacking together a quick demo. Using the combination of Java EE 6, GlassFish, PrimeFaces and NetBeans allowed him to lead a relatively inexperienced team in delivering the first version of the application in just three weeks. David also mentioned that using GlassFish as a learning tool helps keep his skills sharp and in-demand as GlassFish adopts the newest Java EE APIs faster than the other options. You can check out the details of his story on the GlassFish stories blog.

Do you have a Java EE 6/GlassFish story to share? Let us know and we will highlight it for the community.

Tuesday Apr 01, 2014

GlassFish Server World Cup Edition

We are today very proud to announce the plans and roadmap for our loved GlassFish server and its upcoming versions. In order to continue the availability of the Java EE Platform but also ease the development efforts in solving real world problems, the GlassFish team brings to you a sneak peek of the upcoming GlassFish Server World Cup Edition.

The first releases will be focused on major events like Olympics, America's Cup, and anything that will make you wonder why the heck this was not built before but instead only an abstract platform to run custom applications?! Wonder no more! We decided to provide you with specific GlassFish Server <fill in your real world bussiness need> Editions. Waste no more time in writing code, debugging, deploying, and maintaining custom applications. Submit your business need to our GlassFish JIRA with the tag #SpecialEdition and we may consider it in our roadmap.

Utopic customers, if you are looking for commercial support of the GlassFish Server World Cup Edition, grab some popcorn and watch a real game on your TV while you wait for the announcement of Oracle WebLogic World Cup 2018 Edition at Oracle OpenWorld 2017.

Friday Mar 28, 2014

Migrating JDBC Resources from GlassFish to WebLogic


Customers and users always want to make sure their
Java EE applications run nicely in any application server. But it is not uncommon that sometimes resources must be migrated by hand, or luckly and preferably automated with scripts.

So in order to help our customers and users in getting ready for future migrations from GlassFish to WebLogic, I am following up with my series of articles about Migrating from GlassFish to WebLogic

This time I covered the migration of a resource every Java EE developer knows very well: JDBC resources, or simply, DataSources. But before that, make sure you read the first article in case you haven't: Migrating a Java EE App from GlassFish to WebLogic

Continue reading "Migrating JDBC Resources from GlassFish to WebLogic" ...


Wednesday Mar 26, 2014

Introduction to GlassFish Management and Monitoring

Robust management and monitoring is a key value proposition for modern Java EE application servers that most developers seem to be unaware of. Fortunately this is changing rapidly as more and more developers get exposed to operations concerns via the DevOps movement.

GlassFish has never been a slouch when it comes to management and monitoring (although an application server like WebLogic truly excels in this area). GlassFish has long provided many ways for management and monitoring including the admin console GUI, the asadmin command-line tool, a REST admin interface and JMX. If you don't know about these features as a GlassFish user, you owe it to yourself to learn a bit more about it.

A golden opportunity for this was recently organized by our friends at the London GlassFish User Group. On March 6th they organized an excellent virtual event with celebrated Java EE advocate, author, JCP expert and Java Champion Adam Bien on GlassFish management and monitoring. Fortunately for all of us, the event was recorded and you can check out the video below:

Much of the material covered in the talk is also covered in a recent OTN article that Adam wrote - it might be easier to use as a reference.

Tuesday Mar 04, 2014

Migrating from GlassFish to WebLogic: The Beauty of Java EE

WebLogic is Oracle's strategic application server for the Java EE Platform. And since Oracle decided to focus on it for commercial support, and to leave GlassFish free of any ties from commercial decisions, I decided to bring customers and users a series of blog posts about migrating Java EE apps from GlassFish to WebLogic.

GlassFish will continue to thrill as the Open Source Reference Implementation for the platform, its community, and source of innovation, like we are seeing through the Java EE 8 survey.

In this series, I will help GlassFish customers as well users to experiment, try, and evaluate Oracle WebLogic 12c (Java EE 6 certified) to deploy their mission critical applications. Continue reading through the first part, where I actually demonstrate "the Beauty of Java EE 6", by migrating a sample application without any code change.

And don't forget to follow @glassfish, @java_ee, and @oracleweblogic on Twitter! 

Friday Feb 28, 2014

The Basics of Connection Pools in Glassfish

Connection and resource pooling (including thread and instance pooling) is a key value proposition of modern application servers like GlassFish and WebLogic to significantly boost scalability (in fact, WebLogic has long had significantly richer pooling features than GlassFish). While most in the Java EE community take this for granted, many other less mature and robust server-side platforms lack this feature. Indeed, many newcomers to Java EE do not seem to quite grasp connection pooling, even database connection pools. Andy Overton of C2B2 consulting comes to the rescue!

In a very written recent blog entry, Andy explains the basics of database connection pools, demonstrates step-by-step how to setup a connection pool in GlassFish a few different ways and discusses some key configuration options such as pool sizing along with outlining some best practices. It is well worth a read if you are a GlassFish or Java EE fan!

Friday Feb 21, 2014

GlassFish Monitoring and Management Virtual Event with Adam Bien

Our friends at the London GlassFish User Group are at it again - organizing cool, must-see events for all GlassFish enthusiasts :-). This time, they are even going virtual so you can attend wherever you might be! The event is on the rich monitoring and management capabilities built into GlassFish and is being led by none other than Adam Bien - celebrated Java EE advocate, author, JCP expert and Java Champion.

The event will take place Thursday March 6th at 4:30 PM GMT. You can read more details and register here!

Wednesday Jan 15, 2014

Java EE/GlassFish is Tops (on SlideShare :-))!

It seems Java EE/GlassFish is topping charts - well, at least on SlideShare anyway :-). As many of you know, our team has quite a bit of content published on the popular SlideShare site, including on the official GlassFish account and my personal account. An extremely large amount of folks use that content - I didn't realize just how large until today. The GlassFish account is among the top 5% of all content viewed on SlideShare, while my personal account is in the top 1%.

Below is a list of the top ten content we have on these accounts:

  1. What’s New in Java Message Service 2 - 22,889 views.
  2. Building Java HTML5/WebSocket Applications with JSR 356 - 22,036 views.
  3. Fifty Features of Java EE 7 in 50 Minutes - 19,994 views.
  4. JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond - 19,857 views.
  5. JSON-P - 15,747 views.
  6. Using NoSQL with JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE - 14,429 views.
  7. JAX-RS 2: New and Noteworthy in the RESTful Web Services API - 13,881 views.
  8. Java EE Concurrency Utilities - 9,549 views.
  9. Java Batch - 9,251 views.
  10. Applied Domain-Driven Design Blue Prints for Java EE - 7,507 views.

This of course is in addition to the many folks that interact with us at conferences, Java user groups, on Twitter, on this humble community blog, on JavaLobby/DZone and so on. I want to thank you for listening to us and look forward to continue to generate newer content that's useful to you. I also want to assure you that it is a privilege and I know the team is always eager to hear from you as to what can be done to keep the Java EE and GlassFish communities moving forward.

Tuesday Dec 24, 2013

Season's Greetings and Happy New Year from the GlassFish/Java EE Team!

On behalf of the GlassFish and Java EE team at Oracle I wish you and your family Season's Greetings and a very Happy New Year!

As you know this has been quite an eventful year for us - especially with the release of Java EE 7 and GlassFish 4 as well as the now ongoing survey effort to help drive the agenda for Java EE 8 and GlassFish 5, not to mention efforts like the revamped GlassFish.org community site. We are ever thankful for your support and we hope to continue to try our best to serve your interests, perhaps against what many would consider pretty tall odds.

In the coming year, we will look forward to working harder than ever in engaging you through the Java EE open standard, the GlassFish code base, Adopt a JSR, Java EE Blue Print projects and this humble community blog among many other existing and upcoming efforts.

Thanks and best wishes once again. We hope to see you next year!

Friday Dec 20, 2013

Server Sent Events (SSE) in Glassfish/Jersey

As you know, HTTP is a stateless protocol. For most use cases in the enterprise, the statelessness of HTTP is a huge boon for scalability - a benefit that is also extended to REST. However, there is a certain class of arguably emerging use cases for which the stateless nature of HTTP is actually a scalability challenge. These use cases require the bidirectional, full-duplex, asynchronous characteristics of stateful protocols such as TCP. Examples include chat-like online collaboration, stock-ticker like command-control/monitoring, online gaming and the like. WebSocket (and the Java API for WebSocket newly included in Java EE 7 :-)) is ideal for these cases. Between the seemingly diametric opposites of plain HTTP and WebSocket, there's also Server Sent Events (SSE). SSE is aimed at yet another scenario - a steam of events generated by the server and consumed passively by the client. Although not standardized in JAX-RS 2/Java EE 7, Jersey/GlassFish includes support for SSE.

In an very detailed blog post, Rahman Usta of the Istanbul JUG explains SSE and demonstrates a non-trivial use of the Jersey/GlassFish support for SSE.

Wednesday Dec 18, 2013

Want to Work on WebSocket/Tyrus? Oracle is Hiring!

The WebSocket team at Oracle is looking for another key contributor! If you want to become part of the dynamic, high-profile team that is working on the industry leading Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356) reference implementation Tyrus and related open standards, projects and products like Java EE, GlassFish and WebLogic, this is the time to update your resume/CV and share it with us. The job is based in Prague, Czech Republic.

The formal details of the job are on LinkedIn.

If you are interested and have any questions, please feel free to post your questions here, get in touch with the Tyrus team or drop an email directly to pavel dot bucek at oracle dot com.

Wednesday Dec 11, 2013

'Come and Play! with Java EE 7' in London!

"The French and the British are such good enemies that they can't resist being friends."
(Peter Ustinov)

Our friends of the London GlassFish User Group are planning their next event on the 9th of January 2014. For that occasion, Antonio Goncalves (Paris JUG, Devoxx France, Java EE EG Member, author...) will dare to cross the Channel to talk on Java EE 7.


'Come and Play! with Java EE 7'

As you know, Java EE is old-fashioned, heavyweight, cumbersome, and made mostly of boilerplate code. Who would develop a modern Web application with such a technological stack? Who would start a heavy application server, deploy some EJBs, and wait ages for integration tests to run - only to end up with an ugly Web page?

If you like HTML5 front ends with responsive design, sexy graphical components, manageable REST interfaces, easy asynchronous processing, reliable messaging, and transactional databases, come to this session to see two developers writing and testing a real Java EE 7 Web application within 1 hour.

More info can be found here.

Monday Nov 18, 2013

JMS2@London GlassFish User Group

Some of you may be aware that the London GlassFish User Group got launched a few months ago. The group is organized and sponsored by C2B2 Consulting. C2B2 continues to offer GlassFish support and C2B2 Technical Director Steve Millidge recently offered his pretty level-headed reaction to the discontinuation of Oracle commercial support for GlassFish - it's worth reading for perspective.

The Manchester, UK based JMS 2 specification lead Nigel Deakin recently led a session in the group on the new JMS 2/Java EE 7 features in GlassFish 4. The video for the talk is posted below. There's also my own slide deck on JMS 2 posted on SlideShare (with source PDF and abstract).

Do consider inviting Nigel to give a JMS 2 talk if you are relatively local to him. Also, consider supporting the group if you are local to it. More recently, Nigel presented a JavaOne 2013 technical session titled Easier Messaging with JMS 2.0 as well as a Birds-of-a-Feather session titled What’s Next for JMS?. Stay tuned to Parleys.com for video of the sessions to be posted (the slide decks are already posted on the linked JavaOne Content Catalog).

Friday Nov 15, 2013

MOXy is the New Default JSON-Binding Provider in GlassFish 4

When I talk about JAX-RS 2, JSON-P and Java EE 7 a surprising number of people seem to assume that GlassFish and Jersey does not support JSON binding and just supports lower level JSON processing. It is in fact correct that Java EE 7 has standardized JSON processing (via JSON-P) but not a JSON binding API yet (although such a standardized API is a very strong consideration for Java EE 8 and would build upon the JSON-P work). However Jersey, the popular JAX-RS reference implementation, has long had strong support for JSON binding via MOXy, Jackson and Jettison (now it also has support for JSON-P of course). In fact, in GlassFish/Jersey the default JSON binding provider is MOXy. If you are not familiar with MOXy, it is a very interesting project part of EclipseLink (the JPA reference implementation) that translates JAXB annotations to JSON. In a code driven post, Blaise Doughan of the Oracle EclipseLink team explains the details of using MOXy with JAX-RS in GlassFish.

For more details on Jersey's support for JSON, you should check out the very well-written documentation.