Wednesday Jan 19, 2011

Amazon moves into PaaS with Elastic Beanstalk, Java as 1st class citizen

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Amazon's EC2 and its sister S3 service have been indisputable leaders in IaaS for a long while now and GlassFish and more generally J2EE/JavaEE took advantage of it starting in 2008 (see here and here), with documented how-to's and significant production references.

Just yesterday, AWS's Evangelist Jeff Barr announced AWS Elastic Beanstalk (main page) which reads to me like Amazon's entry into the PaaS space (with Java!). This new service supports deployment of WAR-packaged Java applications to an infrastructure composed of a Container+Server (Tomcat on EC2) and a load-balancer with Auto Scaling and Notifications features. What seems less clear is the multi-tenancy story, if anything special is done for databases and JDBC connections but also whether containers can form a cluster to offer session high availability (HA).

It's great to see the Java platform as the primary (and for the time being only) target for such a service. Let's hope that support for the full Java EE 6 platform isn't too far out!

Exciting times ahead, the fun is only just starting, stay tuned!

Tuesday Oct 27, 2009

AWS Now With MySQL Support




Amazon has just announced the availability of a new service: the Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), based on MySQL 5.1 (AWS Blog, RDS@AWS).  They support both InnoDB and MyISAM but not replication.  See notes from: Mark Callahan@Facebook, Robert Treat@OmniTI, CannelWeb...

RDS's pricing depends on the size of the DB instance, ranging from 1.7 GB, 1 ECU to 68 GB of memory, 26 ECUs. Also note that EC2 has lowered its prices.

Quoting from the RDS site, this is how Amazon is presenting the value prop:

Amazon RDS automatically patches the database software and backs up your database, storing the backups for a user-defined retention period. You also benefit from the flexibility of being able to scale the compute resources or storage capacity associated with your relational database instance via a single API call. As with all Amazon Web Services, there are no up-front investments required, and you pay only for the resources you use.

More AWS info at Products, FAQs and elsewhere at AWS. Overall, this is a good move from Amazon, and the whole space is going to continue to change rapidly in the near future, see for example AWS@Oracle and Oracle@AWS.