Friday Nov 12, 2010

Apple Joins OpenJDK

Below is the bulk of today's joint press release by Oracle and Apple where they Announce OpenJDK Project for Mac OS X.

For more information on Java, visit:

Java Platform, Standard Edition
OpenJDK
JDK 7 Feature Roadmap

Oracle and Apple Announce OpenJDK Project for Mac OS X

REDWOOD SHORES and CUPERTINO, California—November 12, 2010—Oracle and Apple® today announced the OpenJDK project for Mac OS® X. Apple will contribute most of the key components, tools and technology required for a Java SE 7 implementation on Mac OS X, including a 32-bit and 64-bit HotSpot-based Java virtual machine, class libraries, a networking stack and the foundation for a new graphical client. OpenJDK will make Apple’s Java technology available to open source developers so they can access and contribute to the effort.

“We are excited to welcome Apple as a significant contributor in the growing OpenJDK community,” said Hasan Rizvi, Oracle’s senior vice president of Development. “The availability of Java on Mac OS X plays a key role in the cross-platform promise of the Java platform. The Java developer community can rest assured that the leading edge Java environment will continue to be available on Mac OS X in the future. Combined with last month’s announcement of IBM joining the OpenJDK, the project now has the backing of three of the biggest names in software.”

“We’re delighted to be working with Oracle to insure that there continues to be a great version of Java on the Mac,” said Bertrand Serlet, Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering. “The best way for our users to always have the most up to date and secure version of Java will be to get it directly from Oracle.”

Apple also confirmed that Java SE 6 will continue to be available from Apple for Mac OS X Snow Leopard® and the upcoming release of Mac OS X Lion. Java SE 7 and future versions of Java for Mac OS X will be available from Oracle. 

Java is a general purpose software development platform that is specifically designed to be open and enable application developers to “write once, run anywhere.” The Java platform is most widely used in business software, web and mobile applications.

Wednesday Oct 27, 2010

On the JCP EC Nominees and the Deprecation of Java on Mac OS X

Tuesday last week, Oracle disclosed the List of Candidates to the JCP Executive Committee, and then, on Wednesday Apple, as part of the launch of the new MacBook Air, announced the Deprecation of Java and the new Mac App Store Approval Guidelines (requires registration as Apple Developer) that would disqualify Java Apps.

Not surprisingly, there have been plenty of reactions; below I capture a few notable ones.

JCP EC Election

Two names in the original announcement elicited more reactions than others: Hologic (candidate for a ratified seat) and Doug Lea (who resigned). A couple of questions have gone through the bboard set by the JCP for asking questions to the candidates, but most of the conversations have been through blog posts.

Some (non-exhaustive) posts include:

Make your own mind, and recall that JCP members can vote until the 1st.

Deprecation of Java on Mac OS X

The second big announcement was Apple's Deprecation of Java, and the impact of the new 3.3.1 (Guidelines, Engadget, InfoQ).

The general consensus is that this would not impact server-side Java but many are concerned about the impact on client-java and on developers and their tools, like Eclipse, IntelliJ IDEA, and NetBeans. OpenJDK has a BSD Port Project into which SoyLatte effort merged in late 2007. The port is not a full replacement for the Apple distribution, in particular, it relies on X11 for AWT support.

Some reactions:

Steve gets the final word here, from an email:

"Sun (now Oracle) supplies Java for all other platforms. They have their own release schedules, which are almost always different than ours, so the Java we ship is always a version behind. This may not be the best way to do it."

We will keep you posted as the situation evolves.

Sunday Oct 25, 2009

Apple at MacOS Forge: "The ZFS project has been discontinued"

ALT DESCR

Apple kills ZFS at MacOS Forge. The effort had shown signs of stress for a while, so the community reaction ([1], [2]) has been to quickly move to a new site; see Dustin's announcement and MacZFS @ Google Code.

See reactions on the web at Engadget, AppleInsider, Gizmodo and Macrumors.

The Goodbye message was very terse. Given Apple's usual behavior, I doubt we will get any more details than that. Overall reaction is quite muted - the reaction meter at MR was 85+, 400- but the Discussion Thread is quite mild (and technically uninformed).

Tuesday Oct 14, 2008

... JSF 2.0 on GlassFish, Comet Framework, Rack on JRuby, WS-Trust in Metro, 256 Threads in a 4U, new MacBooks

A compilation of today's news of interest:

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Arun shows how to use JSF 2.0 with GlassFish v2 in his Mojarra on GFv2. I believe the current thinking is that JSF 2.0 will not depend on Servlet 3.0 and will be able to run on Java EE 5 containers.

Atmosphere, JFA's new portable Comet framework, is now here; check the Announcement.

Jacob promised more JRuby frameworks and it seems that Rack Support is the first step. Rack provides an minimal interface between webservers supporting Ruby and Ruby frameworks, so things like, Merb, build on top of it. Seems a role equivalent to that of modjy in Jython?.

Jiandong shows how to use WS-Trust to Secure Web Services in Metro.

Yesterday's big announcement was T5440 (aka Batoka), a 4 socket, T2-based, 256 hardware threads, at 1.4GHz with up to 512GB memory, all in a 4U chassis! For techies, start with the posts by Allan and Josh, the T5440 WebSite and the Benchmarks. The press has nice reactions: [1], [2], [3]. Also check how to use it to Scale SugarCRM using Ldoms, and the new LDom cookbook. If you like it, give it a Free Try and Buy!.

Today, Apple announced the new MacBooks and MacBook Pros. Need to go check them out at the local Apple store, but I'm disappointed there is no Blu-Ray nor a sub-1K$ entry (in the new enclosure).

Sunday Sep 14, 2008

... JSF Features, Griffon, Sailfin Competition, Size of EJB 3.1, IzPack and IPS, and Apple Store Revolts

A compilation of today's news of interest:

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From the land of the JSF 2.0 Spec Ed is asking for feedback on the last list of JSF Features that are considered by the Expert Group. The Full List has 37 entries, of which 20 are Listed as Hard.

Griffon is a Grails-like framework that uses Groovy and Swing for RIA. Geertjan has already written an Overview and now explains how to add support to it in NetBeans by Converting Grails to Griffon. Both NetBeans and GlassFish Server are very inclusive on the scripting front: a very warm welcome to our party!

A quick heads-up from the Sailfin community: a last chance to enter the Sailfin/Ericsson Contest, the deadline is Sept 30th.

Adam continues his advocacy for EJB 3.x, specially EJB 3.1 and points out that the implementation of EJB 3.1 is very small! Ken just told me that the EG is making good progress with the next public draft, so stay tuned on that front.

Julien continues to work on IzPack for GlassFish (as time is available!) and now has a version using the IPS Packaging system and GlassFish v3. Check out JPZ's note, while ChrisK goes into More Dicussion of the IPS details. The download is here - Julien said he would try to get a new rev "soon"...

And noises of unhappiness with the recent Rejection of Podcaster from the iTunes AppStore because: <quote>Since Podcaster assists in the distribution of podcasts, it duplicates the functionality of the Podcast section of iTunes<\quote>. See the comments from Spier (the developer of Exposure) and Gruber.

Monday Aug 11, 2008

... Managing GFv2, SMF in OpenSolaris, $30M in 30 Days, MySQL and GF, Kindle and Java

A concise compilation of today's news of interest to TheAquarium readers:

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Nazrul provides Links on GFv2 Monitoring, including GF-bundled tools, other Sun and 3rd party tools, documentation and web sites.

Arun documents how to start the MySQL and GlassFish Bundle, with detailed steps and screenshots.

Dave, writing in the SocialSite Blog, provides an Overview of the Apache Shindig REST API, which is used by the SocialSite implementation.

TheObservatory continues with their list of benefits of OpenSolaris; number 1 was ZFS; number 2 is SMF (Service Management Framework) - although, strictly speaking, SMF is also on plain good old Solaris.

The WSJ on Revenue from Apple's Online App Store: 30$M in the first month; the benefits of controlling the distribution channel to a large installed base.

And, showing again the value of content and connectivity CNet reports that Kindle sales are projected at $1 billion by 2010 (recall that that Kindle uses Java in its implementation)