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  • JavaEE |
    Monday, August 17, 2015

A Journey from Tapestry to JSF 2.2 and JavaEE 7

After the key Java EE 6 release we have seen a steady stream of folks migrating from various non-standard frameworks to Java EE - all for their own good reasons. One such very recent detailed migration story was shared by Lenny Primak. He successfully migrated from Tapestry to Java EE 7/JSF 2.2 and shared his observations in a series of (eighteen!) blog entries. His candid independent insights with regards to JSF/Java EE are likely very helpful to current and potential adopters.

I do think it is very important to take any such migration story with a grain of salt. All of this is just one person's view about what is right for them while choosing amongst a complicated set of trade-offs. It is never wise to over-generalize from those unique perspectives instead of choosing what is right for a given situation. We certainly should not forget that all non-trivial technology has it's advantages and drawbacks over time. Tapestry is a great technology in the overall ecosystem that standards like JSF do adopt good ideas from (and the opposite is likely to also be true). It is also possible to use Tapestry with Java EE as an alternative to JSF.

You can read Lenny's entire migration story on his personal blog. Although eighteen entries can seem daunting each entry is short/to-the-point and well written. Here are some highlights for the very impatient:

  • In the conclusion Lenny notes "As I looked at the big picture, it turned out to be easier to convert the whole app from T5.3 to JSF and PrimeFaces instead of T5.4, and that’s what I did. This turned out a great decision. Everything is compatible, future JavaEE versions are easily adoptable, all integrations do not require heroic efforts to implement or maintain and even JavaScript and Ajax with JQuery even started to be fun to develop."
  • Lenny opted to use Apache Shiro instead of built-in Java EE application server security such as GlassFish Security or WebLogic Security. He found that Shiro was easy to use with JSF and Java EE - "After the switch to JSF, however, Shiro, with it’s standard configuration, worked as expected, and I was able to build all of the security requirements in the application very quickly."
  • Lenny had some nice things to say about JSF generally and JSF 2.2 in particular - "The JSF way seems to be more flexible and saves code", "writing the same function in JSF and PrimeFaces took only about 10 lines of CoffeeScript code", "...major feature of JSF 2.2 is HTML 5 support, and ability to write JSF applications in standard HTML5 syntax as opposed to JSF tags...this development prompted me to re-evaluate JSF as my tool set".
  • Lenny found contributing to Java EE extremely easy "when trying to contribute to JavaEE, I was welcomed right away. The attitude really shined, and I was able to contribute valuable bug fixes without too much hassle."
  • Lenny found it more sensible to work with standard EJB 3 and JPA features instead of the Tapestry approach to persistence - "I found it better to call EJBs from Tapestry, and let EJBs handle all JPA transactions, thus totally bypassing Tapestry-JPA. This turned out to be the best solution of using JPA with Tapestry."
Do you have a similar interesting Java EE adoption story to share with the community? If so, please do reach out and we will find a way to properly highlight it.

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