Wednesday May 27, 2015

JavaOne Java EE Track: Saying Thanks and a Look at the Real Decision Makers

The JavaOne 2015 CFP is now closed. I want to thank all of those that submitted their thoughtful topics and all those who considered submitting. In the Java EE track we now have all the raw material we need to construct a strong selection. In the next few weeks we will be working hard with the review committee to carefully sort through all the submissions we have at hand.

I also want to take this opportunity to introduce you to the real decision makers in the track - the content selection committee members. The folks in the committee by far play the most important role in help shaping the track. This year on the track we are fortunate to have David Blevins, Cay Horstmann, Johan Vos, David Heffelfinger, Ryan Cuprak, Scott Sosna, Markus Eisele, Kevin Sutter, Linda DeMichiel, David Delabassee, Bruno Borges, and Harold Carr. You should get to know these folks if JavaOne is something you care about. I've posted their profiles on my personal blog. In the next few weeks, I plan to publish interviews with some of these folks through this humble blog.

Keep in mind that JavaOne is now already open for registration. I hope to see you all at JavaOne. In the meanwhile as always if you have any questions never hesitate to reach out.

Tuesday May 26, 2015

Java EE @ Devoxx UK

Devoxx UK is fast approaching! The conference will take place in London at the usual venue (Business Design Center) in June. Devoxx UK is covering a broad range of topics and obviously Java EE will be well covered.  Various Specification Leads and EG members will be present in London so it will be a good opportunity to catch-up. Here is a short overview of some of the Java EE related activities. For the full Devoxx UK agenda and additional practical details, see here.

Adopt-A-JSR Summit

The Adopt-A-JSR Summit will take place on Wednesday. This event, co-organized by the community and the JCP, will bring together Specification Leads, Java User Group, JCP leaders, OpenJDK leaders, Evangelists and conferences attendees in order to discuss how the community can be involved in shaping the future Java platform.

Conference

During the conference, several sessions will be devoted to Java EE:

And last but not least, we will have the 'traditional' Java EE BoF and a Hackergarten.

Will I see you in London?

Tuesday May 19, 2015

Virtual Adopt-a-JSR/Java EE 8 Overview on Tuesday!

As some of you know, the Chicago JUG has been doing a great job engaging with Adopt-a-JSR and Java EE 8. As part of that effort the JUG will host a virtual meeting on Google Hangout Tuesday, May 26 at 6:00 PM Central Standard Time (Chicago). Although the meeting is focused on the Chicago JUG because it is on Google Hangout, anyone is welcome to listen in! The session should also be recorded so you can view it later - stay tuned here. These are just some of the things that the meeting will cover:

  • Introduction to the JCP/JSR process
  • Adopt-a-JSR
  • Status of the different Java EE 8 JSRs
  • The different ways in which JUG members can contribute
  • Live example (pick a JIRA, discuss and craft a reply, suggest a patch, try to recreate, raise a new JIRA)

The meeting will be led by none other than key Chicago based Java EE author and community advocate Josh Juneau. Folks that will attend in support include Chicago JUG leaders Freddy Guime and Bob Paulin as well as Heather VanCura of the JCP. Other folks from our team may also join in (I will sadly not be able to attend as I will be on a trans-Atlantic flight at the time :-(). Josh presented the Java EE 8 status update portion of the talk at the Chicago Coder conference very recently. His slide deck is now on SlideShare. I also spoke at the Chicago Coder Conference and will share the trip report in the next coming weeks.

In the meanwhile, you can find the details for the meeting on the Chicago JUG meetup page and the link to the actual Google Hangout is here.

Monday May 18, 2015

GlassFish Images on Docker Hub

Great news to our fellows bleeding edge Java EE developers and GlassFish users. We are now pushing two images of the application server to Docker Hub to make it even easier to try new and upcoming releases. The GlassFish organization is under registry.hub.docker.com/u/glassfish/, and here are the two images we have:

GlassFish Nightly Builds

This image is based on the latest builds of GlassFish, and updated when a new build is produced. To try this one, run:

# docker run -ti -p 4848:4848 -p 8080:8080 glassfish/nightly

This will give you the asadmin console. Start the domain with start-domain:

asadmin> start-domain

And access the console at http://localhost:4848. The default admin username and password are: user=admin / password=glassfish.

GlassFish Ozark - MVC RI

This image comes with GlassFish 4.1 modified with the required changes to run the new specification MVC 1.0, part of the upcoming Java EE 8 platform. To run this image, do:

# docker run -ti -p 8080:8080 glassfish/ozark

This will start GlassFish and deploy the Ozark Samples application. To access it, go to http://localhost:8080.

Have fun with GlassFish on Docker containers! 

Thursday May 07, 2015

Using @Context in JAX-RS

The @Context annotation gives, to a JAX-RS implementation, the ability to inject contextual information (e.g. Configuration, Security Context, etc. ) in a JAX-RS end-point. This capability is available since the early day of the specification, since JAX-RS 1.0. There are many scenarios where this feature is useful (e.g. access one of the HTTP header parameter of the consuming client).

To get more information, you can check the JAX-RS Specification (@Context is described in Chapter 9 & 10) or alternatively, you can read this 'Using @Context in JAX-RS' piece written by Abhishek Gupta (see initial instalment here).

Tuesday May 05, 2015

Java EE 7 Maintenance Review Draft

The Java EE 7 Platform Specification (JSR 342) is currently going through a maintenance release process. If you check the proposed changes, you will see that this update is really about clarifying the specification itself; none of the proposed changes will impact the Java EE 7 RI nor the TCK. So clearly, only the specification itself will be slightly impacted.

It seems that a consensus has now been reached amongst the Java EE 7 Experts Group over the proposed changes and if everything goes well, the update will soon be submitted to the JCP to formally initiate the Maintenance Review process. 

Tuesday Apr 21, 2015

Managing a Java EE Application Server with Chef

Chef is a popular open source infrastructure automation framework that has been popularized with the whole DevOps movement. In a nutshell, Chef has the notion of Recipe and Cookbook. A Recipe is written using a Ruby based DSL to describe how to install and configure software(s) on a host. And as the name suggest, a Cookbook is a collection of related Recipes.

Needless to say that managing Java EE Application Servers with Chef is a common use-case. You just need to use the appropriate Cookbook for your container : GlassFish, WebLogic, WildFly, TomEE, etc.

Monday Apr 20, 2015

A Directory for CDI Plugins

One of the key goals of CDI was to significantly improve Java EE platform extensibility at the core component level. Generic dependency injection alone goes a long way in making it fairly easy to integrate third-party components and libraries. CDI goes much farther by offering an entire portable extension API geared specifically towards writing CDI plugins. The most obvious manifestation of a resulting CDI ecosystem is plug-in collection projects like Seam 3 and it's successor DeltaSpike. However, there is actually a lot more to the CDI ecosystem, most notably tools (think IDEs) and larger projects that offer CDI pluggability.

So far there has not been a concerted effort to create a directory of sorts for the CDI ecosystem. While such a directory will (hopefully) never be completely all-encompassing it is helpful to have one place you could go to in order to find out all the plugins available for CDI. Most recently the CDI specification site added an ecosystem section to try and address this need. The page is looking pretty good already including listings like DeltaSpike, VRaptor, Vaadin, Camel, Forge and Arquillian - you should check it out. I can already see a few missing though like MyBatis/CDI, Agorava, Struts 2/CDI, Wicket/CDI, ZK/CDI and a few more (I'll reach out to the CDI folks to see why these might be missing). If you similarly see any CDI plugins that should be listed, you should try and reach out (the top of the CDI ecosystem page says how you can do so).

Friday Apr 17, 2015

Java EE 7/Bean Validation Adoption at Harvard University

One of the most important things to do at this stage of the life-cycle of Java EE is highlight successful adoption stories. We have been doing just that for a long time through our adoption stories blog as well as JavaOne. JavaOne 2014 was particularly good in this regard and JavaOne 2015 looks to be even better. Indeed we hope the folks with great adoption stories that submitted last year but did not get accepted will resubmit next year. We will continue to highlight some of those sessions from JavaOne 2014 in the next few months. In this vein I'd like to highlight a very interesting real world story of practical usage of Bean Validation 1.1 in a Java EE 7 application at Harvard University.

Harvard University Institute for Quantitative Social Science's Dataverse application has been one of the earliest Java EE adoption use cases on GlassFish. They started with Java EE 5 and are now using Java EE 7 in the real world for a fairly complex application. The Dataverse application is an open platform for publishing, citing, analyzing, and preserving research data across universities. Although it started with Social Sciences, the application is now branching out to other fields such as Medicine and Astrophysics. The application makes full use of the Java EE stack including JSF and Bean Validation.

In their JavaOne 2014 talk project lead Gustavo Durand and senior developer Stephen Kraffmiller shared how they were sucessfully utilizing Bean validation in their Java EE 7 application. They shared some pretty advanced use cases and great practical insight. You can see their awesome JavaOne 2014 presentation below (if you are having trouble seeing the embedded video it is available here).

If you have a similarly great Java EE adoption story to share (particularly migration stories from other technologies), please do feel encouraged to share it through a JavaOne 2015 submission. The CFP deadline is April 29th, so you should hurry. In the spirit of Java EE centric vendor neutrality, what Java EE implementation or tool set you choose does not matter at all and neither does which part of the globe you are in.

Thursday Apr 16, 2015

JSON-P 1.1 (JSR 374) update: JSON Pointer & JSON Patch

'Java API for JSON Processing 1.0' also known as JSON-P (JSR 353) is the standard JSON Processing API that was added in Java EE 7.  JSON-P will be updated and that update (JSON-P 1.1 - JSR 374) should be included in Java EE 8. One of the goals of that revision is to add support for 2 JSON standards namely JSON Patch and JSON Pointer.

By nature JSON is simple and most of the standards in that space are simple as well. JSON Pointer and JSON Patch are 2 IETF RFCs that are closely related. JSON Pointer defines string syntax for identifying a specific value within a JSON document while JSON Patch defines a set (one or more) of operations to apply to a target JSON document. JSON Patch is leveraging JSON Pointer to specify where operation(s) need to be performed in the target JSON document. And a JSON Patch is in itself a JSON document. The most common pattern will be to apply a JSON Patch to transform a JSON document but it will also be possible to obtain a JSON Patch by comparing 2 JSON documents, the returned JSON Patch will then be a 'diff' between the 2 JSON documents.

It is the early day of JSR 374 but the EG is certainly making progress. At this stage, it is already possible to test, amongst other new features, JSON Pointer and JSON Patch as the early build of the JSR 374 RI already support those. Those tests would be a good place to look to understand how the API works. Note that at time of writing, the 'diff' method isn't yet implemented in the early JSR 374 RI build.

Getting feedback early on is really important for the various EGs!  Make sure to look and test the various APIs that will, at some point, be part of Java EE 8.

If you want to know more about the JSON-P 1.1, watch this JavaOne session where Kinman Chung (JSR 374 Specification Lead) explains the plans for JSON-P 1.1. In addition, the Java API for JSON Processing project page, the JSR 374 Users mailing list and Issue Tracker are useful resources to check.

Wednesday Apr 15, 2015

Last Call to Submit to the JavaOne Java EE Track

This is a first and last reminder from us to all of the folks out there that the JavaOne 2015 CFP closes on April 29 - just about two weeks from now.

The procrastinator in you might be thinking two weeks is plenty of time. In reality if you haven't started working on your submissions yet, you are probably setting yourself up for some stress that will likely result in a weak submission. This is especially true if like most of us you will need to collaborate with others or get your boss's approval for your submission. Putting things in perspective the CFP has already been open for about two weeks so other folks already have a head start to maximize their chances of getting accepted. We want to make sure everyone in the community has a fair chance to help us build a strong Java EE track agenda by submitting their best ideas. As always, never hesitate to get in touch if you have a question.

Consider the following as inspiration for submissions to the Java EE track (the only real limits of course are your own imagination on anything in the Java EE ecosystem):

  • Existing and upcoming Java EE technology JSRs and implementations
  • Cool stuff that extends Java EE in new and interesting ways
  • Case studies using Java EE 5, Java EE 6 or Java EE 7 (specially migration from other technologies)
  • Best practices and design patterns for using Java EE technologies
  • Emerging trends in the ecosystem such as HTTP2, HTML5 and microservices
  • Insightful research, development and analysis work in server-side Java

Fortunately or unfortunately some previous JavaOne CFPs have been extended beyond their initial date. Please do yourself a favor and don't assume this will happen again. You may be winding up denying yourself a shot at submitting your great talk altogether :-).

Finally, here is that all important link to the CFP. Hope to see and accept your great topic soon :-)?

Tuesday Apr 14, 2015

Java EE Security API (JSR 375) Update

"If you don't vote you can't complain. Get involved." (David Blevins)

From the current set of Java EE 8 JSRs, 'Java EE Security API' (JSR 375) is the latest one as it was only approved in December last year. It was started later than the other JSRs. Nevertheless, the EG is now very active (+200 messages just for last month!). 

Obviously, this effort need a strong focus as 'Security' can mean a lot of things. And depending on whom you ask, you will high likely have different views. So to EG is currently busy filtering and consolidating ideas. In addition, one thing that is clear is that having a common ground for discussions is really needed. So the EG is also working on defining a security API terminology; i.e. a common vocabulary to enable concise and accurate communication amongst the EG and the community (see here). This may sounds obvious but it's not; e.g. what's the difference between a user store and a user realm?

During JavaLand, some EG members have presented a few ideas that will be tackled in this JSR. Alex Kosowski (JSR375 Specification Lead) also presented, during Devoxx France, the plans for JSR 375. Alex's session recording will be made available in the coming weeks. In the meantime, you can check the slides.

Since there are potentially a lot of things that could be addressed in this JSR, the EG needs to make sure they address the right features, in the right order and in the right form. So the goal of those different sessions is really to expose the EG current plans and ideas but more importantly to get your feedback!

To know more, you should check this playground has it contains prototype ideas for possible inclusions in this JSR; lurk in the JSR 375 users mailing list and voice any relevant feedback!

Monday Apr 13, 2015

A Preview of Java EE @ GIDS 2015

The Great Indian Developer Summit (GIDS) 2015 will be held on April 21-24 in Bangalore, with a follow-on GIDS.Mini to be held on April 25 in Hyderabad. GIDS is very easily the largest and most significant developer event in South Asia. Perhaps reflecting global demographic shifts in software development, GIDS may also now have become one of the largest developer conferences in the world. It is truly a privilege to be able to speak at the event and I am even more fortunate to have a number of Java EE sessions there. While in India I am very happy to say I will also be speaking at a couple of entirely community driven JUG events at the Madras JUG (Chennai) and the Hyderabad Java user group before and after GIDS.

Below are a preview of my talks at GIDS:

  • Using JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE 7: This is my thus far extremely popular and well-received talk on using Java EE 7 as an effective back-end for JavaScript/HTML5 rich clients. If this is a development model that interests you, the talk should give you some valuable tools to get started. Although I use AngularJS for my examples, the basic participles from a Java EE 7 perspective apply to any JavaScript/HTML5 or native/hybrid mobile client. The slides for the talk are on SlideShare while the demo code is on GitHub. Besides Bangalore, I will be repeating this talk in Hyderabad for GIDS.Mini.
  • Reactive Java EE - Let Me Count the Ways!: This is one of my newest and thus far also extremely popular and well-received talks. It explores how Java EE 7 APIs like JMS, MDB, EJB @Asynchronous, JAX-RS/Servlet/WebSocket async, CDI events and Java EE concurrency utilities along with Java SE 8 features such as lambdas and Completable Futures work to align the platform with the reactive movement. The slides for the talk are here.
  • Applied Domain-Driven Design Blue Prints for Java EE: This talk essentially introduces the Cargo Tracker project. In the talk I cover the very basics of DDD, discuss how DDD constructs apply to Java EE and show how the mapping can be done using Cargo Tracker. The slides for the talk are here.

  • I am very honored that the Madras JUG and Hyderabad JUG invited me to speak to their members while in India for GIDS and very proud that I was able to accept. The GIDS organizers were very gracious in extending their goodwill to support the community. Both the JUGS in Madras and Hyderabad have arranged all day events in slightly different formats, which is awesome.

    The Madras JUG will host multiple talks on the same day. I will be delivering the opening keynote as well as a technical session. For the keynote I will be delivering my thus far very well-received talk titled Why Open Standards and Java/EE Matter. In the talk I will discuss the basic value proposition of open standards like Java and Java EE in maintaining a healthy, competitive, multi-vendor ecosystem. The slides for the talk are here. For the technical talk, I'll be delivering the latest update on Java EE 8. Besides covering the current state of Java EE 8 I also cover how you can get involved in the process including through highly inclusive programs like Adopt-a-JSR. The slides for the Java EE 8 talk are also on SlideShare. The Madras JUG event will be held before GIDS and the details for the event are here.

    The Hyderabad JUG is hosting the Java EE 7 Hands-on-Lab as a full day workshop. This is essentially our flagship lab/workshop at the moment covering Java EE 7. It has always proven popular so far and it is a great way to get some hands-on experience with Java EE 7. The Hyderabad JUG event will take place after GIDS.Mini and the details are here.

    Hope to see you in India soon during at least one of these events? As always never hesitate to reach out to me if there is something I can help with or if you have a question. I'll bring along some Java/Java EE goodies you are welcome to :-).

    Thursday Apr 02, 2015

    MVC 1.0 (JSR 371) Early Draft Review period has started!

    MVC 1.0 (JSR 371) formally known as the 'Model-View-Controller Specification' has just entered the Early Draft Review period. This is significant because it is the first Java EE 8 specification to enter this phase. Kudos to the JSR 371 Expert Group! JSR 371 is ‘just’ a piece of the Java EE 8 story but this step shows that, slowly but surely, Java EE 8 is starting to take shape.

    You are strongly encouraged to review the early draft of the specification, test it using Ozark, the open source JSR 371 Reference Implementation and obviously provide comments and feedback!

    The MVC specification is really easy to grasp for anybody familiar with JAX-RS, the samples bundled with Ozark will also help to understand the specification. You can also check Ozark's sources and the presentation I gave a few days ago at JavaLand. 

    To test the first Ozark milestone build, you need a recent GlassFish build (post 4.1 build, see here for details). Another and simple solution to test JSR 371 and Ozark is to use this script to create a Docker image with GF, Ozark and the JSR 371 samples pre-deployed.

    The Early Draft Review period will end of April 30th. For specification related feedback, you can use the JSR 371 users mailing list or the JSR 371 issue tracker. For Ozark related feedback, please use the Ozark users mailing list or the Ozark issue tracker.

    So what do you think of JSR 371? Also, should we use this Docker based approach to help you test other upcoming Java EE 8 specifications?

    Wednesday Apr 01, 2015

    Java EE @ ConFoo Canada 2015

    ConFoo 2015 took place 16-20 February in Montreal, Canada. To my knowledge it is the largest developer conference north of the border. The conference has roots in PHP, but has been making an effort to better attract a Java audience hence it was important for me to support the conference. If you are a Canadian Java developer, I would consider adding ConFoo to your radar as a more convenient (and possibly cheaper) event to go to in order to stay up-to-date. Thanks to a number of community speakers such as Ryan Cuprak, Hanneli Tavante and Rodrigo Candido da Silva the Java EE presence was very strong this year. There were Java EE centric talks on JAX-RS, OAuth, cloud, Java EE 7 and Java EE 8.

    I personally delivered two sessions on JMS 2 and testing Java EE applications with Arquillian in addition to a couple of lighting talks on Java EE 8/Adopt-a-JSR as well as Domain-Driven Design (DDD)/Cargo Tracker. More details on the sessions and ConFoo, including slide decks, videos and code, posted on my personal blog.