QA, Sun Style

Jonathan Schwartz sent out an email yesterday morning about our new SunGrid service. In his email, Jonathan did not preach about how wonderful SunGrid is or give us an ultimatum about how we need to push it to our customers. No, instead he told us how to log onto SunGrid and requested that we each do our best to break it. Nice. Even better, he offered Ultra 20 workstations to anyone who uncovers a critical bug, and iPods to the first 20 people to give the site a thorough test drive and offer feedback.

Welcome back to Sun! This is exactly the kind of thing that made Sun such a cool place to work in the first place. Way back when, Sun was a family, and there was a feeling that the employees were valued and respected. In the last few years, though, that feeling had faded. I think a big reason is that upper management (Yes, Scott, that includes you.) started taking the employees for granted.

To me, this email is a dove with an olive branch. It signals that the employees are once more being treated like family and not like overhead. This email says to me that Jonathan 1) knows that his employees are his best resource, and more importantly 2) isn't taking that resource for granted.

Perhaps I'm reading a lot into a bribe to get some free QA, but to me, the email itself is much more exciting than the workstations or the iPods.

Comments:

So where is that email? Or is it, hum, Proprietary and Confidential?

I'd like to help, really, but as long as it's "Sun vs The Rest Of The World", I can't.

On an aside, it's nice that you feel you and your fellow employees are not taken for granted. That's one of the lessons of Open Source: You can't take people for granted.

Posted by Christopher Mahan on October 28, 2005 at 01:31 AM PDT #

The email was indeed company-internal only. Nothing wrong with that at all. The SunGrid is coming incredibly soon and Jonathan's email requesting Sun employees to try to break it -- that's par for the course. We prefer that we find (and fix!) bugs before products are made available to customers. Not only does it help with your experience of the product, it motivates us to make better products in the first place.

Posted by James McPherson on October 28, 2005 at 11:15 PM PDT #

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

templedf

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today