JavaOne 11: Tuesday AM

Welcome to JavaOne, day one. First impression: nice backpacks! Second impression: there's a lot of people here! Someone told me that the attendance this year is around 20k! Also of note is that the geek factor is way up. Our efforts to make JavaOne a serious conference with real content appear to be effective.

The keynote this morning was interesting. It was like getting the band back together, with Schwarz, Green, and Zander all on stage. The big take-away from this morning is that, "it's not if we will open source Java™, but how." A close second was the fact that Motorola alone ships more devices in a year than the PC's shipped by all the PC vendors combined. The Java ME space is going to be hot!

The first session I attended today was about implementing ATOM and APP. Very interesting. Using Rome, it looks like one could build a blog server in an afternoon. Anyone care to join me in a project to make Grid Engine qstat information available via RSS?

The technical keynote this afternoon was nifty. Graham and Bill went through the new features in Java SE 6 and Java EE 5. Java EE 5 is such a radical improvement over J2EE 1.4 that it's hard to believe it's the same platform.

As I write this, I'm sitting in a session on the new features of Mustang and Dolphin. Mark Reinhold's list of interesting Mustang's features:

  1. Java-WS can do RESTful web services
  2. javax.swing.GroupLayout
  3. Password prompting
  4. Free disk space API
  5. Classpath wildcards
  6. Annotation processing done by javac -- no need to use the APT
  7. Solaris Dynamic Tracing (DTRACE) support
  8. jhat OQL -- SQL-style heap dump analysis
  9. JConsole plugin API
  10. Attach-on-demand monitoring for JMX

Look for Mustang in October, at least before the end of October, but hopefully earlier. Another cool feature is that Derby will be included in the Sun JDK (not the JRE).

SGE team, this is for you. In Mark's presentation, he talks about the effects of releasing weekly snapshots of the JDK. Looking at a graph of the number of external bug reports for a JDK release without snapshots (Tiger), the bug spikes correspond directly with beta releases. On a graph of Mustang (with weekly snapshots), they got more bug reports and got them earlier. In fact, they've gotten twice as many external bug reports with Mustang as they did with Tiger. The net result is that the JDK team has been able to de-emphasize their beta releases. Betas have just become a "branded" weekly build with little additional testing.

Things to look for in Dolphin:

  • Support for getter/setter pattern
  • Method references
  • Block closures -- may be a readability problem.
  • Native XML support
  • More scripting support
  • Improved JAR facilities
  • Superpackages -- the evolution of friend
  • Desktop frameworks improvements, especially around EoD

When I look at my agenda for the rest of the conference, I see a lot of coffee in my future. More to come later.

Comments:

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

templedf

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today