Inside the C64

Like millions of other people out there, my first computer was a Commodore 64. (A C64c to be specific.) Apparently like millions of other people out there, I still think it was a great computer, and I still have one stuffed in the shed that I keep promising I'll pull out one day and use again. (It's actually one I picked up on eBay a while back. My original one exploded.) Back in college, I had replaced the bootup logo for my copy of Windows 95 with the Commodore startup screen.


   \*\*\*\* COMMODORE 64 BASIC V2 \*\*\*\*
64K RAM SYSTEM  38911 BASIC BYTES FREE
READY.

PC World just posted a nice article that gives a tour of the Commodore internals. Check it out if you're feeling nostalgic.

Comments:

Nice!

As you know, I'm also a C64 fanatic, and I've made the leap of pulling this piece of 8-bit history out of the shed (er, my parents' house, anyway) and setting it up in my office.

As it happens, just yesterday I was out in Mesa, Arizona, searching for the Western Design Center -- the last surviving manufacturer of 6502-series chips. I was a little disappointed to discover that it's basically a house instead of a fab plant, heh.

For what it's worth, the most recent two posts on my blog right now happen to be C64-related. Now if I could only get my hands on one of those crazy tripped-out SID expansion cartridges you had back in high school. :)

Posted by David Simmons on November 10, 2008 at 03:46 AM PST #

<p>I still have mine, you know. I might be willing to part with it if you promise to give it a good home and I get visiting rights.</p>

Posted by Daniel Templeton on November 10, 2008 at 03:50 AM PST #

Thanks for the offer. Unfortunately, I think I blew the SID chip or something in the audio output path on this C64 at some point in my childhood, and I suspect the external SID cartridge and software is designed to complement the internal SID instead of outright replacing it. :/

I'm not sure if it was my frequent use of paper clips to reset the system by shorting out the user port's reset pin, the haphazard homemade a/v cable that my grandfather helped me solder on to the right kind of DIN plug, or any of a number of other hardware hacks I was prone to doing in those days. Maybe some day I'll open it up and see if I can diagnose the problem.

It turns out that not having a working SID also makes it hard to use those modems that rely on the SID to generate DTMF tones. :)

Posted by David Simmons on November 10, 2008 at 04:30 AM PST #

Very nostalgic! somehow I must now think of the Apple IIe and the Olympics game which ran on it :-)

Posted by Thijs Metsch on November 25, 2008 at 12:06 AM PST #

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

templedf

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today