German Cooking Abbreviations

I was just browsing through my keyword searches with Google Analytics, and someone found me searching for the meaning of "el" in German recipes. In another bout of post-facto on-demand blogging, here's the answer:

German AbbreviationGerman MeaningEnglish Meaning
elEsslöffelRoughly one tablespoon (tbsp)
tlTeelöffelRoughly one teaspoon (tsp)
msMesserspitzeA pinch
pckPäckchenA full packet (most often applies to baking powder and vanilla sugar, which come in packets that are about a tablespoon (tbsp))
 TasseRoughly one cup (c)
ca.circaApproximately

Keep in mind that in German recipes, the small measurements are not exact. Cooking something from a German recipe often involves more than just following the instructions. I've usually found that it takes a couple of tries before I get something that tastes right.

Comments:

I've come across a recipe for Lebkuchen that uses the following abbreviations:

TL
Tl
EL

Does anyone know if "Tl" is simply a typo and it was supposed to read "TL", or is this an abbreviation for some other measurement? It's confusing, because I suspect rhat "Tl" refers to a teaspoon and not to a tablespoon. It's rather critical because it refers to the amount of baking ammonia and too much ammonia would thoroughly ruin the cookies.

Posted by Margie Gibson on November 20, 2007 at 09:34 PM PST #

I strongly suspect that it's just a capitalization error and does really mean TL. Because the measure (a teaspoon) is meant literally, a German TL is probably going to be a little less than an American TSP.

Posted by Daniel Templeton on November 21, 2007 at 02:56 AM PST #

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

templedf

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today