Sun technologies announced as Innovations at OOW


These were the top 8 innovation mentioned at Larry Ellison's Oracle OpenWorld keynote:
  • Exalogic Elastic Cloud
  • Exadata X2-8 database machine (follow-on to Exadata v2 announced last year)
  • Java 7, 8 roadmaps (along with SE, EE, ME roadmaps)
  • Unbreakable Enterprise Linux kernel to support Exadata and Exalogic's scale of operations
  • Solaris 11 Express
  • Sun UltraSPARC T3 chip (known to some as Rainbow Falls), the new generation of SPARC microprocessors
  • Fusion built from a common Middleware platform to deliver next generation ERP, CRM
  • MySQL 5.5 with considerable performance improvements
6 out of the 8 (except for Fusion and Linux Kernel) are Sun technologies; how cool is that!
Its terrific to see Oracle finally bringing Sun technologies to their full (sales) potential in the marketplace; this is the balance between innovation and marketing/sales that was missing at Sun. Well-engineering, fully integrated and tested systems together is the kind of dream that Sun engineers always hoped their products would help their company attain. It has been a remarkably successful year for Sun within Oracle and the road ahead looks even more promising!

Comments:

Yes, Sun employees are so happy about it that they're still leaving Oracle in their droves. 'How cool is that'?

Posted by guest on September 25, 2010 at 02:26 AM PDT #

Employees leave for various reasons of mismatch with their employers. Salary ranges dont match up, job expectations dont match up or the business no longer needs the same skill set at the same level anymore (and many more things).
Yes, I have been distressed about many of the departures from Sun as well and I know some of them well. Folks have left for one or more of these reasons. Many left during the acquisition phase because their projects no longer had a future at Oracle (and frankly, some of them didnt have a business future at Sun either although the technology was really cool). As a manager and an employee, I understand that well.
But as part of engineering, its also the case that you want your product to do well for your company and not just be a cool patent-generator in the void. There is no doubt that Oracle is better at capitalising Sun-generated technology than Sun itself was. I feel that Sun engineers are experiencing more of a high with this better business-to-technology match than in previous 10 years at Sun.
I remember in the late 80s and early 90s when this was very much true at Sun. Engineers took great pride in being part of Sun's growth. Compilers, OS, Windowing systems were all innovations that led directly to revenue. Within our own group, it was fascinating to see the deals won, and lost, based on technologies we were better at (and had gaps in). Compilers+tools was revenue-generating, but it had at least one if not two orders of magnitude larger "pull" effect on systems (thus: Sun) revenue.
I guess I (and a lot of employees here from classic Sun) are more 'D' than 'R' in R&D, tho we are no slouches in offering the latest parallelization/autopar, GUI, performance technologies compared to any vendor.
And I hate to add this (because its only one part of the equation and not even the dominant one) that having stable (and good) stock price is so much more comforting than being at 1/20th-1/30th the high and wondering when the market will price you fairly.

Posted by Vijay Tatkar on September 27, 2010 at 04:25 AM PDT #

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About

I have worked with Sun and Oracle for 25 years now; in compilers and tools organization for most of these years followed by a couple of years in Cloud Computing. I am now in ISV Engineering, where our primary task is to improve synergy between Oracle Sun Systems and our rich ISV ecosystem

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