viernes ene 20, 2006

NetBeans 5.0 RC2 is out!

I cannot believe it. I haven't had time to evaluate 5.0 RC1 but ... 5.0 RC2 is out!!

I wonder what the NetBeans team has for breakfast. Wow, this is impressive job, guys!!

Enjoy,
Antonio

viernes dic 16, 2005

Mozilla, Paulo Coelho and customer bases

Mozilla

It seems Mozilla and Firefox are the most used browsers hitting the place. This is a graph of the last 100 browsers used to see this blog:

Last 100 browsers

That's a total of 39+12+9+1+1 mozilla (or mozilla firefox) browsers hitting the place. A total of 62% of browsers. Wow.

Paulo Coelho

It happened by accident. While at the bookstore I happened to meet a portuguese version of Paulo Coelho's "O Diário de um Mago" ("Diary of a Wizard"). I think the english translation is entitled as "The Pilgrimage: A Contemporary Quest for Ancient Wisdom" although I'm not sure. (It talks about a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, the city were I was born).

It's a great book. After that I've met "O Alquimista" and "Brida". All three in portuguese. Nice read indeed. I highly recommend them. These Paulo's books are easy to read (at least in portuguese ;-)) and they talk about the really important things in life.

So what does mozilla have to do with Paulo Coelho?

Well, nothing at all, of course. The fact is that I'd like to learn some portuguese (a very difficult language, from my point of view) and I was told about this virtual school of portuguese. The fact is that the site does not work with Mozilla nor firefox (the browsers I own).

That is, put simply, just stupid. Making a web site that accepts only Internet Explorer and Microsoft users is not a good idea. If my site statistics are right you'll probably loose 64% of your potential readers. So, by making things Internet Explorer specific, you're loosing 64% of your potential clients.

And, well, loosing 64% of your potential clients in your very first page in your web site is just stupid, isn't it?

But, wait, there's even more. You can't visit "Santiago's Way" official site either! Xacobeo (which means "from Jacob" in english, you know, Santiago means "Saint Jacob", actually).

Who selects who?

And this is more food for thought. Trying to select your customer base by rejecting users that don't use your tools is not a good idea. Because it may become against you. After all, who selects who? Who rejects who? Is it web sites selecting and rejecting readers just for the browsers they use, or is it the other way round? The answer is obvious to me: I reject sites not accepting firefox. Full stop.

So, since I cannot learn portuguese using Escola Virtual maybe I can learn it anywhere else. Any ideas, anyone?

Thanks!
Antonio

Update: Escola Virtual is working now in Mozilla right now. Damn it! I've already written this blog entry!

domingo oct 02, 2005

NetBeans beta testing tough?

How is it that NetBeans 5.0 Beta has no bugs? How is it that I have been using NetBeans 5.0 Beta during the whole weekend and found no bugs? That's not fair play! You cannot release a beta with no bugs!

And, on the other hand, how will they select people for the NetBeans team? Wouldn't it be better hiring dumb people for a change? Or even normal people? (That way the Acceptance Testing Program will be easier, right?)

How is it that they've included support for four different application servers, Struts, Java Server Faces, Web Services, a new revolutionary Form Editor, best-of-breed refactoring (including Java 5 annotations, which I didn't expect), developer collaboration and impressive plug-in development... just a beta away from the last release?

What will these guys have for breakfast?

I'm glad to see there're some prizes and gifts for NetCAT 5.0 users. I wish them best of luck. They'll be playing with (against?) a tough team!

jueves sep 08, 2005

Qué bueno - Seth Godin

If you own a commercial web site and want to make money from it then go read Seth Godin's Knock-Knock free ebook.

I have just read it and, finally, I understand web marketing.

After all I'm telling friends about his ebook. So he's done a great marketing job with his book, right? ;-)

¡ Qué bueno !,
Antonio

lunes ago 29, 2005

Towards Humanity: Oh, my!

I have finally installed Kubuntu overwriting the Debian partition. It seems "Kubuntu" means "Towards Humanity" and it's a KDE based distribution of Ubuntu, which in turn is a Linux distribution based on Debian. I am not very keen on Gnome, because I hate depending on lots of different libraries with different evolutionary speeds (remember I suffer from frameworkfobia). So I prefer KDE. Furthermore, KDE uses C++ so it's less error prone and allows developers to concentrate on real work instead of fighting with libraries (and dependencies). So KDE based products are usually much more sound, robust and usable.

Kubuntu it's indeed nice. Very usable. I'm running KDE 3.4.0 and I have to admit it's a great improvement over previous versions of KDE. Much faster. Simpler. Nicer. Eye candy everywhere. Good job guys!

The installation was really smooth. Just a single (bootable) CD and some network connections. Since I have special partitions for my software and my home directories I was all set within two hours. This operating system has periodical security updates (probably based on Debian security updates) so I think it's safe to run it on a daily basis.

It's impressive how operating systems have evolved within the last few years. My box may run: Solaris 10, Mandrake 9.2, 10.0, 10.1 (Community & Official), Kubuntu and Windows XP (without network access, so no viruses but those from Microsoft).

So maybe I suffer from frameworkfobia and operating-system-filia. :-)

I'll keep you informed periodically on my happiness with Kubuntu. A great step towards humanity!.

Cheers
Antonio

UPDATE: KUbuntu review here

jueves ago 25, 2005

Debian: Love it or hate it?

I was reading at infoworld that "The Debian Consortium takes on Novell, Red Hat". It seems Bruce Perens has said:

A lot of people have been unhappy with the service they've been getting from a certain very large Linux vendor.

So I decided to visit Debian's homepage. And I noticed that Debian 3.1 is out since June 2005. It has taken several years to the Debian team to release 3.1 (Sarge, they call it).

As I said a year ago I am a Mandrake-Linux user. Or I was. I think. ;-)

Once upon a time I was a Debian fan, so I decided to give Debian 3.1 a run. As a matter of fact I miss several Debian features in Mandrake.

And because installing Debian has been, is, and will probably be a pain in the neck; I decided to post some installation notes about the whole process. For you and for me. Just to keep track of the whole pain ;-)

  • Installation mechanism: Internet (I'm doing 100Kbps at home). I downloaded and burned the network installer CD. Booted. No problemo.
  • Install process: text based. Not bad. Good enough.
  • Gnome libraries crept inside the default selection. Since I don't like Gnome at all I had to deselect them by hand. Pain. I'd prefer having at least two options for desktop users: "KDE desktop" and "Gnome desktop". I was not that lucky, though, and I had to select stuff by hand.
  • Video card selection. I don't remember what video card I have. Debian should find that out for me. It's an ATI Radeon 9000 with 64Mb RAM (let me write it down). pain.
  • After configuring X I had trouble with the mouse. I had to manually specify /dev/input/mice as the mouse device. pain
  • KDE 3.3 (I expected 3.4, anyway, I installed the "stable" Debian release, so I prefer stability to new features) runs much faster than KDE 3.2. Works fine.
  • KDM (login manager) didn't work. I had to manually edit the file myself (I think I broke something by launching the Control Panel before installing KDM. So it's me to blame, not Debian).
  • Kernel: The default kernel is a pain in the neck since it has lots of weird stuff (and it's 80386 compatible, so it doesn't use Pentium optimizations pain). I prefer thin kernels. I had to compile it myself. pain.
  • By the way, Debian has no administrative graphical GUIs. I don't miss them very much. I used "KUser" to add users to the system. Remember to add users to group "audio" to be able to hear your MP3.
  • Network: The system thinks my network is always on; so I had to tell the system that it's me who manually starts/closes the network. This is done with the interfaces file. pain.
  • CD burner: I installed K3B and all the packages it depends on. K3B is unable to find "cdrdao" in "/usr/bin". I think this is a K3B problem, not a Debian problem. Anyway I think it should not be installed in the "stable" distribution if it fails that much. Anyway, K3B never worked on Mandrake either. So I think I won't be able to use it in Debian either.

So that's it basically. I'm glad I've written it down for future reference. Just in case I decide to give a try to Debian 3.2. Next year or so, I assume.

To summarize: I think Debian is for advanced users. Needs some dedication for installation, but once installed it's a piece of cake, I hope ;-). I'll be using it for a while; after the installation nightmare dissappears from my memory I'll donate something to the Debian team. After all I have tons of ready to use software out there in the Internet. (But k3b, of course).

Cheers,
Antonio

lunes ago 22, 2005

Intel and the Speed of Light

Have you ever thought why Moore's law is ending? Have you ever wondered what the limit to microprocessor speed is?

The answer is given by this equation:

lambda = c / f
Where lambda is the wavelength (m.) c is the speed of light (3.0e8 m./s.) and f is the frequency (in Hertz, this is, 1/s.).

Now let's apply this equation to a frequency of, say, 3.4 GHz. This is, 3.4e9 Hz. We have:

lambda = 3.0e8 / 3.4e9 = 0.088m = 8.8 mm.
This is, 8.8 millimeters. Pretty small, isn't it?

So what, you ask? Well, if the dimension of the circuit is around the dimension of the wavelength of the signals you want to propagate then you're in trouble. The circuit itself radiates, and generates interferences between different parts of the circuit, and you enter the world of distributed parameter circuits, or transmission lines.

This is, the higher the frequency of a microprocessor the smaller the wavelength (the closer to a distributed parameter circuit).

Or, as IBM people put it:

Raminderpal Singh, senior engineering manager at IBM Corp., agreed that signal integrity has become a significant and surprising problem at 90 nm. Part of his job is helping 90-nm customer designs get through IBM's fabs.

"As people push the density, and push the frequency, and voltage goes down, you just have a lot more happening and a lot less to live with," he said. "A whole series of effects becomes very real."

That simple equation, lambda=c/f, is the main reason why higher frequencies are not that important nowadays in microprocessors. Concurrence, multi-core and multi-processors, on the other hand, are getting more and more important.

So the time for higher and higher frequency processors is finished. Dual core systems (AMD) and multicore systems (Sun's Niagara) are the way to go. That's what we'll see in the coming months in the microprocessor area. If you're not ready for dual-core and concurrency you'd better rush, as Intel did.

Happy threading,
Antonio

sábado jul 23, 2005

NetBeans and SQL

For the future SwingWorker examples I'll use JDBC connections. So I thought it could be a good idea to explain how to setup the PointBase database integrated with NetBeans.

It's very simple. Just follow these steps.

1.- Start the Pointbase Database

Start the PointBase database

2.- Connect to the Pointbase Database

Connect

Connect

(The password is pbpublic)

3.- View the data on the "CUSTOMER_TBL" table

View Data

The CUSTOMER_TBL table

With these instructions you're ready to run the SwingWorker JDBC examples I'll be posting by next week.

Keep on swinging! ;-)

viernes abr 22, 2005

NetBeans 4.1 RC1 available!!

I'm just downloading it now. I'll let you know how the thing rocks in a few days (I'm sort of busy lately), and I'll post some tricks for Linux users.

I'll be trying out the VisualGC garbage collection monitorization tool (available as a NetBeans module, of course) to see how well NetBeans rocks.

Have fun meanwhile!

jueves ene 13, 2005

SwingWorkers discontinued

Hi all,

I have removed the Swingworkers project at java.net. The fact is that somebody at Sun has put a better implementation and has asked me to rename the swingworkers project. If you still want to get the sources for that let me know.

The fact is that the new implementation is much more flexible than mine. Hope to see it soon there at java.net.

I'll post here whenever the new one is available, so keep tuned!

lunes ene 03, 2005

Using JDK1.4.2 with NetBeans 4.0

I always forget to use this:

ant -Ddefault.javac.source=1.4 -Ddefault.javac.target=1.4 compile

To compile NetBeans 4.0 projects usind JDK 1.4.2 on the command line. The fact is that I still use JDK1.4.2 often, so I need to compile my NetBeans projects with JDK1.4.2. The line above performs that magic for me.

So since I always forget the trick I decided to share the trick with you here, so we all have it handy in case of need.

Happy NetBean-ing,
Antonio

miércoles dic 15, 2004

NetBeans 4.0 out !!!

NetBeans 4.0 is out!!!

That's good news. Time now to wait for 4.1 ;-)

viernes dic 03, 2004

NetBeans 4.0 RC TWO out

So I've downloaded NetBeans 4.0 RC1 and tried it out but... NetBeans 4.0 RC2 I mean 2 is out!!!

Downloading again ;-)

jueves dic 02, 2004

Identity=money

It seems your identity is as valuable as cash. Possibly your online identity as well. We need to protect our identity. I've seen today that you don't even need to use your true mail address when someone asks for it to register somewhere. You can use Mailinator instead.

Yeah, I'll be using it, just to test.

NetBeans 4.0 RC1 out!!!!

Hi all: NetBeans 4.0 Release Candidate 1 is out. I'm fetching it right now. Let you know how it goes...

Happy NetBeaning!

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