Wednesday May 01, 2013

The Carbon Disclosure Project Spring Workshop

Guest author Elena Avesani, Principal Product Strategy Director at Oracle, discusses her participation in the recent CDP Spring Workshop at the New York Stock Exchange

On April 5, 2013 the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP), an independent non-profit U.K. organization that collects Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) data of major corporations, invited corporations and investor signatories to attend its annual spring workshop at the New York Stock Exchange. I was one of Oracle’s three attendees and was able to attend many informational sessions led by the CDP staff, including a review of the 2013 CDP questionnaire and scoring methodology, the technical changes from 2012 and an overview of disclosure best practices. I also attended several thought leadership sessions.

Several participating companies explained how they leverage CDP disclosure to work with their CFOs to identify cost savings, develop innovative sustainability initiatives, respond to other regulatory bodies (DJSI, GRI, UNGC) and respond promptly to investors’ inquiries. Several speakers highlighted how speaking the same language as their CFO is crucial to integrate CDP responses into an effective communication with investors. Every year investors are increasingly interested on companies’ ESG performance and integrate CDP data into investment processes. Asset management companies look at governance strategy and engage companies to understand if they are aligned to their long term interests. They also look at data in the context of financial information and narrative. CDP thus provides a detailed framework to talk about climate change and disclosure on carbon, water and supply chain management. The nature of these issues shed light on how the company is managed in the long term.

Particular focus was given to strategies for measuring, managing and reporting Scope3 emissions, whose weight is increasing in the CDP scoring process. Scope3 analysis requires a strong understanding of the upstream supply chain as well as the definition of a directional roadmap identifying raw materials, operations and products, procurement strategies, production strategies and logistics assessment. 

Finally, the CDP pushes companies to engage suppliers on climate change and water risks through disclosure to the CDP Supply Chain Module. This disclosure enables companies to understand how to score and benchmark suppliers’ responses and educate suppliers on climate change and costs reduction. Category managers can check CDP scorecards and verify the performance of the company. It was helpful for Oracle to participate in this conference as we continue to gather our data to participate in the Carbon Disclosure Project.

Tuesday Sep 25, 2012

South Korea Upcoming Cap and Trade Legislation

In my previous blogs I talked about climate change legislation trends in California, Australia and the European Union. In the next series of blogs, I am going to highlight how carbon trading and sustainability reporting legislation is evolving in other Asia Pacific countries, including South Korea, China, Japan, India and Taiwan - starting with South Korea.

South Korea passed legislation to begin a national cap-and-trade program in May 2012. Korea is the 8th biggest source of GHG emissions in the world and has a national target of cutting them 30% by 2020. South Korea's program will cover about 60% of emissions and will affect big emitters across the economy, including utilities, major manufacturers and even large universities. Emissions trading is scheduled to begin in Korea in 2015, the same year as in Australia and China.

Oracle Environmental Accounting and Reporting supports the needs of South Korea and helps ensure consistency across organizations in how data is collected, retained, controlled, consolidated and used in calculating and reporting emissions inventory. Learn more about the upcoming cap and trade legislation in South Korea and how to use Oracle Environmental Accounting and Reporting to meet those requirements here.

By Elena Avesani, Principal Product Strategy Manager, Oracle

Tuesday May 15, 2012

Compliance with European Cap and Trade and Carbon Reporting Legislation

In my previous blogs I talked about climate change legislation trends in California and Australia. In upcoming weeks I am going to highlight carbon trading and sustainability reporting requirements in the European Union (EU), focusing initially on the overall EU Emissions Trading System and then on each country’s specific legislation.

 

The EU has been exploring measures to combat climate change for more than a decade and has established a variety of initiatives that have impacted  manufacturers and processors. The EU Emissions Trading System (ETS), launched in 2005, is a significant mechanism implemented to control and reduce the emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHG). As with all Cap and Trade systems, the idea is to engage the market place, with its financial incentives and penalties, to reduce climate-changing carbon emissions rather than through top-down orders from regulators. The ETS established a market for large industrial facilities to trade the right to emit CO2, with the total number of allowances being allocated gradually reduced since inception.

You can obtain full details on how the program works and how you can use Oracle Environmental Accounting and Reporting to meet these requirements here

By Elena Avesani, Principal Product Strategy Manager, Oracle

Wednesday Mar 14, 2012

Compliance with California Cap and Trade and Carbon Reporting Legislation

In one of my previous posts, I talked about greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting requirements in Australia and how companies can address those requirements using Oracle Environmental Accounting and Reporting. Since then I've received several questions about how companies can address GHG reporting requirements imposed by the upcoming cap-and-trade program in California. Here I'll provide an overview of those new regulations as well as where you can get more detailed information.

In January 2012 California plans to launch a cap-and-trade program that will cover electricity generation as well as industrial sources that emit 25,000 tons or more each year in carbon emissions. The new cap-and-trade regulation, which will cover some 360 businesses representing 600 facilities, is divided into two phases. The first phase begins in 2013 and will include all major industrial sources and electricity utilities. The second phase starts in 2015 and will include distributors of transportation fuels, natural gas and other fuels. The goal is to reduce emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020, and to 80 percent below the 1990 levels by the year 2050.

You can obtain full details on how the program works and how you can use Oracle Environmental Accounting and Reporting here.

By Elena Avesani, Principal Product Strategy Manager, Oracle

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