Tuesday Aug 19, 2008

Selmet software with GlassFish - Croatia has more than beautiful beaches and a great football team

Selmet

This time GlassFish is put to work in a Warehouse Management System in Croatia. Selmet operates in an industrial environment offering operators with ruggedized handheld devices communicating with GlassFish-powered Web Services. The most common use of this software is for inventory and article checking.

One interesting side to this GlassFish ISV Partner story is how a mostly Microsoft-minded company benchmarked Micrososft's IIS (the WCF stack) against Metro (GlassFish's Web Services stack) to finally deploy GlassFish on Ubuntu. Selmet used NetBeans as the development tools and PostgreSQL as their database.

Find out more about this story by reading the Full Questionnaire for GlassFish adoption by Selmet and the associated case-study.

Friday Apr 25, 2008

iTAC Software MES, 3 million calls a day

iTAC logo Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) are probably as critical as the web site of an Internet company. iTAC Software explains here how, only 6 months after they found out about the technology, they are using GlassFish as the underpinnings of their iTAC.MES.Suite product to provide direct connection between shop floor devices in manufacturing plants.

iTAC Software operates in industries such as automotive, electronics and medical devices and their software uses a large set of Java EE features such as EJBs, rich IIOP clients, and the Java Connector Architecture to serve up to 3 million hits a day on larger installations. It also includes a reasonable set of Open Source technologies from unit and UI testing to distributed caching such as EHCache.

Make sure you read the full questionnaire, including Volker Burch's take on why Open Source is an obvious choice for an ISV like iTAC Software.

Monday Mar 26, 2007

International Environmental: A Cooling Company Which Prefers Hot Software

International Environmental Corporation Logo International Environmental has been providing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) solutions for over 40 years. They've done work in some of the largest and most famous buildings in the world, including Trump Tower (New York), the Bellagio (Las Vegas), and Times Square (Hong Kong).

Think that sounds like the kind of company which would avoid cutting-edge open source software? Think again.

In early 2006, they were already looking forward to using Java EE 5. Comparing application servers, they found that GlassFish came out on top of JBoss, with "by far, the most complete EE 5 implementation," "much better performance," and an administrative console which was "hands down better."

After completing that evaluation, they set out to replace "various in-house applications" with a new solution running on GlassFish. The results? "With over a year in production, GlassFish has proven to be fast, stable and reliable, and it just keeps getting better." They're now in the planning stages to also migrate the company's "Struts-based, Tomcat-hosted external web site" over to GlassFish (and JSF).

They're using the JSF Reference Implementation, which is also developed as part of Project GlassFish. (Remember, "Project GlassFish" is actually an umbrella which covers the development of many enterprise Java technologies--not just the application server.) Employee Jason Lee is especially active in this area, as one of the developers of the JSF RI.

International Environmental proves that companies in any industry can benefit from using and contributing to GlassFish. Want to learn more about their story? See the full response to the GlassFish adoption questionnaire from Jason Lee, Senior Software Engineer at International Environmental.

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