SuperHappyDevHouse

Last week I had the chance to meet David Weekly.  He's the CEO of a startup called PBWiki and was nice enough to come over to Sun to meet with a couple of us to talk about how start up companies in the valley make technology decisions these days.  David was nice enough to offer that if I wanted to talk to more folks doing start ups I should come to SuperHappyDevHouse.  SuperHappyDevHouse is kind of a floating geek party, and they had an instance of it today at David's place.  There were over 100 folks here, most of them actively hacking and looking for other hackers to chat with -- either socially or to exchange ideas (or even recruit for their companies).

I drove over to David's house this evening and hung out for a bit.  I chatted for a while with a graphics programmer named Bruce.  He was working on a C++ template-based framework for ray tracing.  I think the last time I looked at a C++ source file was 1996, so I had to activate some very stale neurons.  In fact, I'd forgotten there are things like .h files.  I also talked for a while with a self-described QA Ninja who works at Apple.  She was quietly looking for more QA Ninjas to come work with her at Infinite Loop, but she was getting tired of people asking her questions about the iPhone, and Apple's ever increasing stock price (nice problem to have if you ask me).  For those of us who suffered through the Gil Amelio and Michael Spindler years it's quite amazing to see how things have turned around there. BTW, the Apple people I talked to at the party were quite psyched about ZFS.  I also spent a while chatting with a guy named Ming who's working on an Internet shopping site

It was fun to see what everyone was up to and talk to a number of different folks.  A lot of people asked me about Sun (after they found out I worked there).  I guess I shouldn't be too surprised that everyone has heard of Sun, but few really know what we do.  Ming was hugely surprised to find out that over 30,000 people work at Sun.  He asked me if most of them build computers and work on assembly lines?  Actually, a lot of them write software (and robots built a lot of the computers).  There are about 1,000 people on the team that create Solaris alone, and that's just a fraction of the software people at Sun.  We at Sun need to find more ways to tell the stories about all the interesting stuff we're building.

For those of you who didn't get a chance to attend.  Here's a one-minute tour just for fun.

David, thanks so much for the invitation.  I had a blast.

Comments:

Steve, I'm really glad you could make it! And what a professionally produced video, already posted! Very cool. I hope you keep coming to these - I'm quite happy to see Sun engaging the new startup crowd.

Posted by David Weekly on June 24, 2007 at 03:23 AM PDT #

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Thoughts on cloud computing, virtualization and data center management from Steve Wilson, Oracle engineering VP.

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