Peder on Simplicity

Peder Ulander (the head of Software Marketing at Sun) has an interesting blog entry about a new digital music gadget called Sonos that gives an even better connected service experience than iTunes/iPod -- my favorite elegant connected service example.

On a related note, Daniel Berg has a recent entry where he claims the big problem with iPod is that it isn't connected all-the-time! It's pretty interesting actually to think about. iTunes is a connected service that is the proxy for the iPod - a totally non-connected device. As Daniel points out, if the iPod itself were constantly connected it would take the experience to the next level.

What's the right answer? Should devices like this always be connected? How do these proxy services like iTunes affect that? We've had an on-going discussion internally about what a non-connected version of the Update Connection would look like. I know it sounds like an oxymoron, but some folks are asking for it. For example, a military installation might have no outside links to the Internet, but they still might want the Upate Connection feature set.

It seems like over time customers are getting much more used to letting data pass through their firewalls when proper protections are in place. For example, every customer of Salesforce.com let's all of their customer information (perhaps the most sensative information they have) flow constantly across the internet.

As an administrator, what are the policies in your IT shop about things like this? Can fully connected services work in your environment? If not, what's stopping you?

BTW, is anyone else amazed by the size of the new iPod Shuffle? Way cool if you ask me!

Comments:

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

Thoughts on cloud computing, virtualization and data center management from Steve Wilson, Oracle engineering VP.

Search

Archives
« May 2015
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
     
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
      
Today