Telling The Story

Just returned from a week in {hot, humid, steamy, rainy} Orlando, Florida, enjoying Disney, Universal, surfing in Cocoa Beach (kids, not me), and some quiet time. I'm almost always impressed with the engineering at Disney theme parks, whether it's the forced perspective that makes Cinderella's castle appear much larger than it is, the transitions between themed lands, or the seemingly irrelevant details (like Hidden Mickeys) that make the Disney experience fully immersive.

The Disney Imagineers have now published two books, one a field guide to Walt Disney World and the other a series of engineering "team exercises". My favorite line from the latter is that if you don't get the results you expected, your story may have gotten confused. Telling the story, complete with minor details and backgrounds, is what makes a theme park experience fun.

It's no different with technology. One of the reasons that Sun has been gaining market share is that we have a powerful story to tell. At the bottom of the dot-com bust, it felt for a while like we had run off the end of the runway with our "dot in dot com" story. Today, we have a pretty simple story: we build infrastructure products (software, services, storage and computer systems) that are power, space, price, developer and operator friendly. The story resonates with both coders and CIOs -- two of our biggest audiences for the Sun narrative. How those products implement identity, or how you best develop software for a chip multi-threading CPU, or how we support minimized security configurations are the details in the story.

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Hal Stern's thoughts on software, services, cloud computing, security, privacy, and data management

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