Monday Mar 02, 2015

SPARC: (Still) Not Dead, Since 1989

Okay, I wanted to talk about IEEE's recent event honoring SPARC; but, before I even get started, I should address a couple of points about the title.

First: when I’ve written before about our technology history, I've sometimes been asked, “Should you really be talking about how old such-and-such a thing is?”

Not even a problem here.  As far as current enterprise processors are concerned, SPARC’s still the new kid on the block:

x86? 1978.

Mainframes?  Still around, as you know.  Built on an architecture announced in 1964.

IBM POWER? 1990.

And yes: I see that hand waving frantically in the back: “WAIT!  WAIT!  But why does the title say ’1989’?  Wasn’t SPARC introduced in 1987?!”

Well, yes. Yes, it was. Gold star for you!

But it’s been not dead since 1989.

A PROUD TRADITION OF BEING NOT AT ALL DEAD CONTINUES

In 1989, I'd just joined Sun, after several years as a customer.  I was of course up on all the news about the brand new SPARCstation 1, and I was excited to learn what was coming next.

Which was a full-frontal assault from our competitors.

Not to blame them; I mean, here we were, the fairly-new guys (only 5 years old at the time SPARC was announced)—and we dared to come out with an entirely new processor architecture?

And this is where, two years in, we started to hear people (well, our competitors) say: SPARC is dead!  Never going anywhere.

HP was probably the leader in death-knell pronouncements, because they’d just bought Apollo, which had a line of "SPARC-killer" workstations based on the PRISM processor.  Those faded out right about the same time I found out where the coffee supplies were in the office.

But that’s OK, because HP had a new line of “Snake” workstations, which would totally crush SPARC!  Those did a bit better; the underlying chip hung on long enough to become the processor that HP killed in favor of Itanium.  SPARC-crushing: not so much.

Next up was DEC Alpha, which was—you guessed it—going to be the end of SPARC.  (My favorite DEC presentation tidbit from back in the day: the transition from VAX to Alpha was going to be E-Z ...because they could both read the same plaintext data files !  I’m not making this up.)  Alpha’s still around, technically, as is Itanium.  SPARC killing, though: not achieved.

But there’s more to this story than just sheer survival—SPARC has a habit of becoming the leader in technologies other companies had to scramble to match: RISC computing, extreme chip multithreading, and now Software in Silicon.  SPARC stays not-dead the way any technology does: continuous innovation.

OK… but what’s the next reason for it to be not-dead?

How about four?

FOUR REASONS TO BET ON SPARC


1. Oracle and this other guy named Larry


A lot of people were skeptical—very skeptical—about what was going to happen to Sun’s hardware business after the acquisition.  (That’s OK; some of us at Sun were kind of interested in that, too.)

Larry Ellison answered that pretty boldly on the day the deal closed, laying out a roadmap for SPARC/Solaris systems.  How’d we do on that? Not too bad:


Oracle’s strategy is to be in a business for the long haul, and nothing shows that more dramatically than what has happened with SPARC since then—moving beyond “not dead” to “holy…”.  Oracle’s intensified efforts on both SPARC and Solaris are demonstrably paying off, in a big way, at the same time our main enterprise competitors seem to have lost their way.

2. RISC

RISC—Reduced Instruction Set Computing—was a then-obscure concept that Bill Joy championed in the mid-‘80s, resulting in Sun developing the SPARC architecture.  The idea’s very simple: bet your silicon real estate on the instructions that do you the most good.  As big an idea as that was then, it’s even bigger now.

Here’s why: it’s the best way to deal in silicon with a reality we’ve been living for decades: most compute tasks today are ludicrously over-provisioned on a single processor.  An architecture based on simplified processing units lets you put more flexible compute on a single chip, for less money, less power, less cooling.

By putting more compute units on a single chip, instead of deploying a lot of low-performance systems in your data center, with redundant support hardware, you can now put all that compute in a more cost-effective system.  You drive down cost yet further, and you drive down latency, the real enemy of performance today.

3. Writing to a chip?  You still do that?

Back when I joined Sun, rolling out a new processor architecture was considered to be audacious.  Building a whole new ecosystem was challenging, and optimizations for a particular chip/OS combination were hard-fought battles only won by the most brilliant developers.  

This hasn’t completely gone away, but it’s not what you, the developer/operator, do any more.  You’re going to chunk away at much higher layers of abstraction, and let our campus full of folks in Santa Clara take care of the optimizations.  Our deal with you is: we’ll build and co-engineer awesome hardware, operating systems, software and developer suites, and you use it to build, run, and maintain the services you need.

Bottom line: if you can do it, you can do it on SPARC.  And what we do makes it better.

4. Solaris

You didn’t think I was going to miss that one, did you?  This is a Solaris blog, after all.

The combination of chip multithreading and virtualization has turned the concept of data center performance exactly upside down.  Instead of worrying about how to get enough power to a single application, the challenge is to how to get enough applications onto the power you have.

SPARC/Solaris solves this challenge brilliantly, with an unmatched combination of enterprise dependability and cloud agility.  The strengths that have made Solaris the “go to” OS for enterprise computing continue to get even better, and now we bake in things like OpenStack, built-in virtualization, SDN, and compliance tools to make your life easier, and your applications rock-solid and wicked fast.

ONWARD TO THE SECOND INNING

There's a tendency to think that we're always at the end of the game, when we're really only in the first inning.  If you look at the history of SPARC, you see competitors who wanted customers to think the game was over, before most of the crowd had even settled in their seats.

A few days ago, IEEE celebrated the beginning of SPARC, and that gives us a chance to talk about where that's going to take us. Keep in mind, this isn’t the 9th inning of the compute era. SPARC’s more than just “not dead”—it’s just getting rolling.

Learn more:

Tuesday Sep 23, 2014

Oracle Solaris and Systems Customer Panels at OpenWorld 2014

When you're at Oracle OpenWorld, it's an unmatched opportunity to learn more from your peers about how to get the most out of your investments.  You get a chance to talk to people who've had their hands on the product and hear what's worked and what doesn't work--and share your own knowledge and skills with others.

The best places to do this are at the panel sessions. That's where we bring up customers and other experts who will relate their experiences, and where you can ask them the burning questions about what interests you the most. It's a great way to build contacts with experts both inside and outside of Oracle.  And as Oracle Solaris 11.2 brings you an even broader range of powerful features for getting the most out of your investments and simplifying your life, here's your chance to find out, from people who are already deploying it, why it's the best choice for enterprise cloud deployments.

Our Solaris customer panel this year has deep expertise to share on topics that should be near and dear to any IT organization's heart, including security, storage, system management, and scalable infrastructures.

And of course one of our most popular sessions returns: the Oracle Solaris engineering panel, where you can find out even more from the folks who actually put it all together.

All sessions are at the InterContinental Hotel (on Howard Street just to the west of Moscone West); click on a session's title to reserve your spot and add it to your schedule.

Tuesday, September 30

12:00 PM - Panel: Customer Insights into Deploying Oracle Solaris
(CON7788 - InterContinental, Grand Ballroom A)

Wednesday, October 1

10:15 AM - Real-World Best Practices for SPARC Servers: A Customer Panel
(CON7907 - InterContinental, Grand Ballroom C)

11:30 AM - Virtual Compute Appliance: Customer Insights and Best Practices
(CON7483 - InterContinental, Grand Ballroom B) 

2:00 PM - Panel: Insights and Directions from Oracle Solaris Engineering
(CON7790 - InterContinental, Grand Ballroom A)

Looking for more?  Don't forget about the "Focus on Oracle Solaris" doc, for the latest look at technical sessions, general sessions, demos, and hands-on labs.

Friday Mar 28, 2014

Webcast: Modernizing IBM AIX/Power to Oracle Solaris/SPARC

As I've mentioned before at least one or two times, this is a great time to take a look at moving from IBM POWER servers to Oracle Solaris and SPARC systems.  We'll be discussing this very topic in an upcoming webcast:

Modernizing IBM AIX/Power to Oracle Solaris/SPARC
Wednesday April 2, 2014
10:00am (PT) / 1:00pm (ET)
REGISTER NOW

Oracle's Ken Kutzer and Randal Sagrillo will give an overview of not only what the benefits are of moving to Oracle's systems, but what the simple transition process is to get there.

Meanwhile, while you're waiting for Wednesday, here's a video to check out.  Learn how one company used Oracle's SPARC servers with Oracle Solaris to architect a more robust cloud solution, at a lower cost, compared to x86 servers with Red Hat Enterprise Linux:

Tuesday Mar 04, 2014

Making the Move From AIX/POWER to Solaris/SPARC

Last month was the fourth anniversary of Sun becoming part of Oracle, and it’s been four years marked by a crazy pace of development. Our Santa Clara campus is packed to the brim with our systems hardware and software teams, and they've been busy:

Oracle Solaris 11 and 11.1 have built on the rock-solid reputation of Solaris as the heart of enterprise computing, and introduced unique and innovative cloud technologies, and the SPARC team has been nothing short of amazing, moving through several generations of processors in a very short period of time.

The end result is fantastic engineered systems such as the Oracle SuperCluster M6-32, or if you're looking for something more on the building-block side, the SPARC T5-2. Not to mention our storage offerings, where Oracle Solaris sits at the heart of the Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance.

And where things have really sped up: our ability to work every day to design and execute solutions hand in hand with the Oracle database, middleware and applications teams.

Needless to say, we don’t have any plans to stop.

At the same time... we can’t help but notice what’s going on over at IBM.  A lot of stuff seems to be going up on the auction block. And we're not sure if they have any plans to stop that, either.

So, this seems like a good time to note some of the things we’re doing to make it as easy as possible to transition from the AIX/POWER world to the Solaris/SPARC world.  First off, we have a white paper:




Simplify the Migration of Oracle Database
and Oracle Applications
from AIX to Oracle Solaris





There's a web site with even more resources:

http://oracle.com/aixtosolaris


That's where you'll find information on why making the move to Oracle Solaris / SPARC systems is such a good idea, see what the business and performance advantages are,  learn how to plan your move and find out how Oracle can help. The bottom line: if you're going to run Oracle workloads -- or any other mission-critical workloads, you should run them on Oracle.

Oracle Technology Network also has a great AIX-to-Oracle Solaris resource page.

And on the Oracle Learning Library, there's training information on migrating from IBM AIX-based servers. 

If you want a bit more color commentary, Giri Mandalinka has an interesting take on this (provocatively titled "AIX Customers: Run for the Hills").  On the Oracle Hardware blog, Kelvin talks about how to "Migrate from AIX to Oracle Solaris in 4 Easy Steps". And over at the OTN Garage, Rick Ramsey has a "just smell those hydrocarbons" pic of a '68 Dodge Charger heading up a list of "Oracle Solaris 11 Resources for the AIX Sysadmin" .

Friday Jun 21, 2013

June 27 Webcast: Announcing Oracle's Fastest Engineered System

What happens when you take the world's fastest microprocessor and build an engineered system around it? We'll find out next week, but I'm guessing the word "fast" will be involved.

Maybe even "fastest" -- yep, there it is:


Live Webcast: Announcing Oracle SuperCluster T5-8
Thursday June 27, 2013
10:00am PT / 1pm ET

REGISTER TODAY!

Wednesday May 15, 2013

New White Paper Compares SPARC/Solaris to Power/AIX Costs. Guess Who Wins?

One thing that's been clear since the launch of Oracle's new Sun SPARC T5 and M5 systems: it got IBM's attention. Judging from their response, they seem to be... I'm going to go with concerned.

And as I've said before, I don't blame them. A company with a long history behind them, they've made undeniable contributions to the industry, and things were looking good for their enterprise server business, buoyed by the performance of their Power7 processor. But their progress in that area seems to have slowed a bit.  So: concerned.

This report isn't going to help that feeling.

The Edison Group has just released a white paper: Enterprise Server Infrastructure Cost of Ownership: Oracle SPARC T5-2 with Oracle Solaris 11 versus IBM Power 750 Express with AIX 7.1. Spoiler alert: the Oracle systems do better. Key findings:

  • Over a five year period, the Power system solution has a total cost of ownership 59 percent higher than the SPARC T5 solution.
  • There's even more of a disparity in cost of acquisition, where the IBM solution is twice as expensive right out of the chute.

One of the things I found notable was their discovery that Oracle SPARC systems in the field are much more efficiently virtualized than IBM Power systems, with an average of 20 virtualized instances per system as opposed to IBM's 12. This goes against perceptions I've encountered with some people, but is not surprising to me, since Oracle Solaris virtualization is well integrated with the OS, and is extremely efficient in terms of application performance. Of course, it doesn't help IBM's virtualization case that for a system of the class being compared, PowerVM Enterprise Edition will run you an extra $13,440 per server. That's the kind of thing that drives down technology adoption.

Even more interesting: that IBM server with 12 virtualized instances incurs operational and technical services costs that are 28 percent higher over five years than an Oracle server with 20.

There are lots of other worthwhile nuggets in the paper. If you've got services to deploy, you absolutely should give this a read.

Download the white paper (PDF)

Wednesday Apr 24, 2013

Podcast: Oracle Solaris 11 and the World's Fastest Microprocessor

In the latest edition of the Oracle Solaris: In a Class By Itself series, execs Charlie Boyle, Bill Nesheim, Chris Armes, and Markus Flierl emerge from last month's SPARC product launch enthused about what Oracle Solaris brings to the table.

They discuss how we're not only making huge strides with individual products such as SPARC and Oracle Solaris--we're taking the opportunity every day to make the products interoperate with each other and with Oracle's software offerings in incredibly innovative and productive ways, to produce a great customer experience and record-breaking performance. As Bill Nesheim put it, "There are no boundaries in a systems company."

 Listen to the podcast: Oracle Solaris 11 and SPARC T5 Announcement

And, as mentioned in the podcast, we know not everyone can join us in California (or wherever) every time we do a product launch, so we've put our execs and technical experts on the road, too. We've added some in-depth breakout sessions, and just may be coming to a city near you:

Live Event: Oracle Extreme Performance
(Dozens of cities worldwide - check link above for locations and dates)

Tuesday Apr 09, 2013

Oracle Solaris and SPARC Performance, Part 4½

A couple of quick pointers to wrap up this series, at least for now.

First, Steve Sistare's added a couple of three meaty posts to his blog, on "Massive Solaris Scalability for the T5-8 and M5-32":

And I'll let Rick Ramsey at OTN Garage have the final word on Solaris/SPARC screaming performance. Apparently, it's a loud word.

The Screaming Men of Finland and Oracle SPARC Chips


Monday Apr 08, 2013

Oracle Solaris and SPARC (and x86) Performance, Part 4

East or West?

I admit it. Being a bit removed from my days as a system administrator, and not necessarily steeped in the day-to-day existence of network design, I was slightly perplexed when I first saw the original of the illustration on the right.

This was shortly after we'd acquired Xsigo, a company whose name also did not immediately reveal anything about the cool stuff they made, and what problems it solved.

So here's this slide I need to present, with this illustration, and no speaker notes. Well, most of it makes sense, but "W" and "E"? Ah, possibly "Web" and "Enterprise"! It sure couldn't be anything like, I don't know... "West" and "East!" What would that have to do with networking?

And many of you are already throwing things at your screen, yelling, of course it's "West" and "East," dumkopf! (Especially if you're German.) It turns out that if you're smarter than, oh, say, me, you know that the "East/West problem" is a thing, and Oracle Virtual Networking, the products the Xsigo acquisition adds to our portfolio, are the things that solves that thing.

Home is Best

(If by "home" we mean "simplified data center deployments with a wire-once solution and simple software defined network configurations."  And it's my blog post, so that is indeed what it means.)

Simply speaking, east/west traffic is the traffic that rather than going in and out of the data center (which in the world of this metaphor is called north/south traffic), goes between servers in the same data center -- or even within the same physical server.

Clearly, the more devices you have interposed in this traffic, or the more congested your connections are, the slower, more complicated, and expensive things are. Equally clearly, east/west traffic is becoming a really big deal in the age of virtualization and networked storage.

Oracle Virtual Networking addresses this in a big way, with an open architecture data center fabric delivering 80 Gb/sec bandwidth. Not only does this make for faster services (customers have seen fourfold application performance improvement), it can also cut capital expenditures by significant amounts and simplify administration, allowing new services to be set up in minutes instead of days. We have one customer who was able to take the 98 network cables they would run into a single blade chassis down to 6, and drop 6 switches in such a configuration down to 2.

And, as the title of this post indicates, this is now available for Oracle Solaris deployments. It's supported with Oracle Solaris on both x86 and SPARC systems, including the new SPARC T5 and M5 servers.  It also supports Oracle Linux, Oracle VM, VMware, Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Hyper-V, so we've pretty much got you covered.

Where things can get very interesting with Oracle Solaris, of course, is how this can be used in conjunction with a feature like Oracle Solaris Zones, and how that in turn leverages the power of ZFS. Basically, you're putting everything in your data center on frictionless bearings, so that instead of recabling your systems, or having to physically provision new storage, you can instead stand up new application environments at a moment's notice by reallocating existing resources.

Now, instead of throwing things at the screen, I imagine you're now cleaning up the coffee spray and saying, "My gosh, you guys should do a Webcast about this!" Excellent idea.

Webcast: How to Manage Your Data Center with Oracle Virtual Networking
Tuesday April 30, 2013
11:00am PT

REGISTER TODAY

Friday Apr 05, 2013

Oracle Solaris and SPARC Performance, Part 3

Moving on from database, more world record performance, this time with Java. From the BestPerf blog:

And there's a new white paper which discusses the specific advantages for Java performance that Oracle Solaris gives you, such as:

  • Dynamic threading
  • Large page support
  • Optimized support for NUMA architectures, including I/O locality
  • Support for very large memory configurations with the new highly efficient predictive virtual memory system in Oracle Solaris 11.1
  • Leveraging the Oracle Solaris Cryptographic Framework feature for best use of hardware acceleration and optimized software crypto algorithms
  • Leading-edge network performance

It also delves into why Oracle Solaris is a great development and deployment platform in general for enterprise Java apps.

Oracle Solaris: The Best Platform for Enterprise Java

Thursday Apr 04, 2013

Oracle Solaris and SPARC Performance, Part 2

Continuing on the performance theme: Oracle's SPARC T5-8 server is now the world's fastest single server for Oracle Database.  In a server-to-server comparison, T5-8 has a sevenfold price advantage over a similar IBM Power 780 configuration for database.

This is a perfect example of what we can do by co-engineering the processor, the system, the OS, and the database. We've put a lot of work into getting these results, and that work is of course continuing. Oracle is investing significantly in both Oracle Solaris and SPARC technology, and this is just one more step in the journey.

Learn more about why Oracle Database runs best on Oracle Solaris


Wednesday Apr 03, 2013

Oracle Solaris and SPARC Performance, Part 1

In the wake of the SPARC T5/M5 launch last week, there's a lot we can discuss, especially related to performance.

To start with: we've just released an update to Oracle Solaris Studio, with compiler optimizations specifically designed to get the most performance out of applications on Oracle T5, Oracle M5, and Fujitsu M10 systems.

Oracle Solaris Studio compilers generate code that is up to five times faster than code compiled with open source alternatives, and this Platform Specific Enhancment (PSE) to Oracle Solaris Studio 12.3 can get you up to 10% more performance on the latest SPARC processors than code generated with the pre-update 12.3 release. That's a nice boost on top of the already awesome performance inherent to the new processors themselves.

This update is available on My Oracle Support for customers with a support contract; search for Article ID 1519949.1 in the Knowledge Zone for more information.

Thursday Mar 28, 2013

Boom!

The big SPARC launch took place earlier this week. As usual with these events, it was a lot of fun to attend, even if no gimongous tents were involved. I was standing in the back, next to the control booth; as the music went up and the lights went down, next to me, the technical director quietly says into her mike, "Go." And this happens:

And that was pretty cool. But was that the "boom!" I'm referring to?  Nope. That looked more like this:


(Note: Subtitle does not refer to me)

So that's quite a "boom." With the launch of the new SPARC T5 and M5 series of servers, we've set over a dozen new performance records, and shown that back in 2010 Oracle did indeed establish a SPARC roadmap that it could execute on.

Needless to say, IBM has kicked up quite a fuss about this. I would too, if I were them; they thought they had this thing licked. And a pretty funny tweet related to that:

But--the thing I noticed was that as much as IBM tried to talk down the performance specs we demonstrated, they were noticeably silent about what, if any, advantage they might have in the software space. And of course, that includes the OS. When I talk to customers, the truism is almost always that when they use IBM systems, they don't do so because of AIX, but despite AIX.  (Remember "Watson"? Do you know what IBM operating system IBM doesn't run on it?)

Meanwhile, Oracle Solaris remains the gold standard for enterprise OSes.  "If it has to run, it runs on Solaris" is the catchphrase in data centers all over the world. We were flattered when IBM embarked on what some called "Project Copy Solaris," a few years after Solaris 10 came out, but couldn't help but notice they didn't quite hit the mark.  And now Oracle Solaris 11.1 is the current release, and we've done a lot more that no one else seems to be finding the recipe for.

And of course, we've got a big advantage, that we've encapsulated as: Hardware and Software, Engineered to Work Together. Over the last few years, we've been able to demonstrate more and more what that means: at Sun, obviously we did a lot of work to make sure SPARC and Solaris were in sync, but meetings with the Oracle software teams were special events, held only a few times a year, and preceded by phalanxes of lawyers engaging to make sure everyone knew just what could and couldn't be discussed.

That's been replaced by something called: "going to work together every day." And it's paying off. And we can prove it.

We've got some new pages that go into more detail about what's new with Oracle Solaris. Maybe this will be a handy "cheat sheet" for OS developers at other companies. The first site talks about how we've optimized Oracle Solaris to get the most out of this new generation of SPARC processors; the other talks about how the continuous co-engineering process between Oracle Solaris and Oracle database works to the benefit of both.


Tuesday Mar 26, 2013

There Were Giant Flying Businessmen in Those Days

One of the side effects of choosing the name "Solaris" for our OS is that we share it with several other companies in unrelated fields: sunglasses, snack bars, roofing shingles and the like--and the book, of course. I hear there were even movies.

Just for fun, I collected a few images of these on our Facebook page in the album "Sorry, Wrong Solaris," and other people have sent in additional ones over time.

Last night, my cohort Rick Ramsey, he of BigAdmin-which-is-now-OTN-Garage, sent me another one: a Brazilian construction equipment leasing company. "Huh," says I. "Perhaps not the same strong connection to operating systems as, say, a bus company, but let's take a look."

Hmm, what's this?


It turns out this particular "Solaris" company was responsible for doing the site preparations for Cirque du Soleil as they toured South America. And, that tent... there's a SPARC/Solaris connection, there.

Enter Ultra Man

Here we are, hours away from a major SPARC/Solaris-based product event. Those of you who have been kicking around the industry for a while may remember that way back in November 1995, Sun had another event: the launch of Sun's first 64-bit SPARC processor, UltraSPARC.  And especially back then, events like that needed an interesting venue.

Someone's great idea: what if we held it in a really big tent?  And who's got a big tent they don't happen to be using at the moment?

...Cirque du Soleil did! This is one of their tents, set up for the launch event in the parking lot of the then-brand-new Sun Menlo Park campus (alumni will recognize the fitness center in the background). The story about how this event was set up and executed is fascinating, at least to a computer industry/show biz geek like me; leveling out an area and setting up a huge circus tent to hold a one-hour press event with 1,500 people in attendance, then tearing it down again immediately. And the industry hadn't even made it to dot-com madness yet.

The logo for the event was "Ultra Man" (not to be confused with "Ultraman"), "a man, stylized, bespectacled, business suited, legs tapering into flames of rocket fire as if he were launched from a cannon."


That would be he.

There was even a guitarist opening the event, a former Sun employee who knocked it out of the park. What was frustrating to me personally was that this all happened literally days before I moved to Northern California, so I had to settle for watching it via closed circuit TV. Webcast? Yeah, didn't really have those back then, so we instead had satellite downlinks to various Sun offices, which hosted local viewings of the event. That did make it more of a social thing.

As I add this to the Facebook album, the final bit of serendipity, as many of you may already be thinking, is that the site of this 1995 event is today in fact the Facebook headquarters campus.

Today's event isn't going to be quite so elaborate; we've already got a perfectly useful conference center to hold it in. But even if we don't have giant flying bespectacled businessmen waiting in the wings (that I know of), the product news should be very interesting. I don't know if either Larry or John play guitar.

Tuesday Mar 19, 2013

More on the March 26 Webcast: "New SPARC Servers with the World's Fastest Microprocessor"

Let's be real.

If, in March 2010, Oracle had made an announcement about the "world's fastest microprocessor," you might have been left scratching your head.

It turns out that SPARC T3 did come out later that year, and it was a significant boost over the existing UltraSPARC T2 --"a 2x increase in performance over the previous generation of SPARC T-Series systems" -- but no one was saying it was the industry's fastest. However, what was notable was that its release date and performance lined up with the SPARC roadmap issued at the time of the Sun acquisition, which isn't always the norm in this business.


If, in March 2011,  Oracle had made an announcement about the "world's fastest microprocessor," you still might have been skeptical.

But yet again, just a few months later, we announced the SPARC T4, which did set a world record in Java performance.  And it not only kept to the 2010 SPARC roadmap, it exceeded it, smashing the performance levels of the T3. Hmm.


But now it's March 2013.  And the title of the event is "Announcing New SPARC Servers with the World’s Fastest Microprocessor."

That's pretty bold... but given what's been happening in recent SPARC history, is it as hard to believe as it might have been three years ago?

Tune in and find out.

Oracle Live Event: Announcing New SPARC Servers with the World's Fastest Microprocessor
Tuesday March 26, 2013
1:00pm PT / 4pm ET

REGISTER FOR THE WEBCAST

REGISTER FOR THE IN-PERSON EVENT

UPDATE: There will be all sorts of people live-tweeting the event, using hashtag #SPARC. Got questions as you watch?  Send us a tweet, including that hashtag.

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