Friday Jul 24, 2015

Oracle Joins the Open Container Initiative

As you may have heard, Oracle has joined the Open Container Initiative (OCI). We are happy to see an open standard being established for container technologies. We feel containers have some real advantages for cloud deployments when used properly, and we see this as an opportunity to bring our experience with containers to the community. You see, our interest in container technologies didn’t happen recently. We’ve been working on them for more than 10 years.

I find it amusing that the industry has come full circle on containers. With the OCI and technologies like Docker, we’ve comeback to application containers, which is where Solaris originally started with zones.

When I was a kernel engineer in the early 1990’s, we used chroot(1) to create build environments so that the build wouldn’t modify the system we were running on. That worked, but it didn’t prevent me from accidentally performing “rm –rf *” as ‘root’ one night at 2am working against a deadline and not realizing I was not in the chroot environment. (Ouch!) My admin team friends never let me live that one down.

Then, there were BSD Jails. They were the next step in container technologies. They helped prevent those kinds of stupid user mistakes by partitioning a system up into a virtualized environment.

In 2005, Sun Microsystems introduced containers in Solaris 10, called Solaris Zones. Originally, the engineers wanted to build lightweight application containers. This was at a time when the industry was moving toward virtual machines, and it was decided that a full OS container would be better.

Over time, we added great capabilities to Solaris 10 Zones like resource management and exclusive IP Stacks. Security has always been a focus for Solaris and was one of the driving reasons for containers as a technology. Now, you didn’t need to share the stack any longer. We embedded those capabilities into Trusted Solaris. Oracle certified Solaris Zones as a hard partition boundary. So, you could run the Oracle Database in a Solaris Zone and reduce your license costs and only use the hardware you needed; a benefit that’s still in use today.

The work didn’t stop there; we introduced other types of zones, which we use today to support older releases of Oracle Solaris in a zone. And there was even a time when Solaris supported versions of Linux in a zone.

After the Oracle acquisition of Sun Microsystems, the rate of innovation accelerated. Oracle infused new life (and money) into (now) Oracle Solaris development. The Zones team grew significantly.

With the first release of Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 (Yes, we really did that), we gave zones the ability to create secure virtual networks with our built-in network virtualization, code named “Crossbow”.

Continuing on the theme of security, with Oracle Solaris 11, you could delegate administration for Oracle Solaris Zones. You no longer had to give the “Zone Administrator” administrator privileges for the entire system.

We added the ability to update and rollback zones seamlessly with the Boot Environments made possible with the integration of ZFS as the root file system. This meant user errors could simply be rolled back rather than having to hand unroll changes or take backups for every change that was made to a system or a zone. But one of my favorite capabilities of zones was the Immutable Zone! With Immutable Zones, you can make a Zone read-only (or partially read-only) so that not even the almighty “root” can modify it... Hmm... Too bad we didn’t have zones and ZFS when I was a new engineer!

Amazingly, that’s only a few of the highlights of zones in Oracle Solaris 11 11/11. There are many, many more.

Oracle Solaris 11.1 was released about one year after Solaris 11 and we added zones on shared storage (ZOSS). ZOSS allows you to host a zone on a remote disk.

About 18 months after the release of Oracle Solaris 11.1, we released Oracle Solaris 11.2. This was a milestone release for the Oracle Solaris Zones Team (now known as the Oracle Solaris Virtualization Team). Speed has also always been a critical motivating factor for containers. But, with that speed, there’s a tradeoff with containers. That is flexibility. With containers, you share the underlying kernel. So, when you need to patch a container, you patch all the containers on a system at the same time, and then you need to reboot the system, and thus, take all the containers down at the same time! There go your SLAs!

It was about the time that we were releasing Oracle Solaris 11.2 that containers began to get traction as a viable virtualization technology for cloud. I remember reading an article while I was waiting in an airport lounge that said that containers were going to “save the cloud.” I found it ironic that this person had just seemingly come to the conclusion that full virtual machines had a significant amount of overhead that was impacting efficiency of cloud technologies.

I found this particularly funny because I was about to get on an airplane to go tell hundreds of people about 11.2 and a new type of container our team had built into Oracle Solaris 11.2 that acts like a type-2 hypervisor. We call them “Kernel Zones.” So, you are able to run a full kernel in a container, solving one of the biggest problems container technologies have. But even more importantly, our brilliant engineers managed to make the new kernel zones have only marginally more overhead on the system than what we now call a “Native Zone.” So, you get the performance of a native zone (container) and the flexibility of a type-2 hypervisor for Oracle Solaris without the hypervisor overhead. You can read more about kernel zones here.

But kernel zones, while great, aren’t the entire picture. In Oracle Solaris 11.2, we also gave you the ability to reconfigure a Zone while it was running. No more reboots to add memory, disk, CPU, etc.! When you combine that capability with Oracle Database running in an Oracle Solaris Zone, you have the ability to do capacity on demand for the Oracle Database. Allowing multiple Oracle Databases to share a single system in a secure way that doesn’t impact their performance. That’s just cool.

In Oracle Solaris 11.2, we also gave you a full distribution of OpenStack, now called Oracle OpenStack for Oracle Solaris, where we tightly integrated both Oracle Solaris Zones and kernel zones into OpenStack Nova compute.

The final piece to the Oracle Solaris 11.2 puzzle with Zones is Unified Archives. Zones is integrated with Unified Archives. So, you can snapshot a running Zone, and redeploy it elsewhere easily, but because of the integration, you can resize the Zone as it’s being deployed and change the type of virtualization too. So, your dev/test environment is only a 2 vCPU Zone with 2GB of RAM. But you want to deploy it into a much larger 128 vCPU/8TB Immutable Kernel Zone? Engineers use virtual machines, but your production environments use containers or the other way around? No Problem! Just change the virtualization type and/or the size as your needs demand.

Earlier this month, we announced Oracle Solaris 11.3 Beta. You can download it here. In Oracle Solaris 11.3, we give you secure live migration. What makes our live migration “secure?” We automatically offload the Zone to the processor crypto engines as it’s being transmitted from the source. Then, on the destination, we decrypt it via the same hardware automatic hardware offload. Meaning that the Zone is secure during the migration, and there is nearly no performance penalty to do it. Making security simple is one of the important things we focus on. The more complicated security is, the less likely people will get it right. Here’s just one way we make it simple to be secure.

Now, with the Open Container Initiative, we have the opportunity to take all of that technology we’ve been building into Oracle Solaris Zones, and apply them to the original concept zones were born out of, application containers. It’s been more than 10 years in the making, but we’ve come back to our roots.

It’s going to be interesting to see where we go next and where this all takes us. We look forward to being a part of the Open Container Initiative.

Keep an eye out for some more news coming very soon.

Monday Jul 13, 2015

Oracle Solaris 11.3 Blog Posts, Part Two

We've got another wave of blog posts related to last week's beta release of Oracle Solaris 11.3.  (If you haven't seen the first round of 30+ posts, feel free to take a look at those, too.)


General

Developers
Systems Management
Virtualization

Tuesday Jul 07, 2015

Here's Your Oracle Solaris 11.3 List of Blog Posts

Following this morning's beta release of Oracle Solaris 11.3, we've got a new crop of informative posts about its new crop of features.

(UPDATE: and there's more, in a second wave of posts!)

(If you feel like this isn't enough, or you just want to make sure you've done your homework before diving in, you could check out about 100 earlier posts about Oracle Solaris 11.2 -- see list part 1 and part 2).

Thanks as always to Glynn Foster for his valiant efforts in finding and tracking all the posts. 

General

Database

Developers

OpenStack

Security and Compliance

Systems Management

Virtualization

ZFS

To find out who's who in the Oracle Solaris blogosphere, see the blogroll (which is also conveniently linked to over in the righthand column).

Oracle Solaris 11.3: Securing and Simplifying the Enterprise Cloud

This morning, we’ve opened up access to the beta release of Oracle Solaris 11.3.  If you’ve been following along (and if not, why not?), you know there have been some big advances in Oracle Solaris 11, including lightning-fast intelligent provisioning and maintenance, and some key additions to our already highly-regarded “defense in depth” security.

Most notable for the latter is the work we’ve done to simplify compliance checking and mitigation, making it possible for administrators to quickly and easily check system security configurations against industry standards, and get a “report card” showing compliance, with guidance for any areas that may need addressing.

Oh, and did I mention fully-integrated OpenStack?  This is a win in two ways: it not only brings access to the fastest growing open cloud platform to Oracle Solaris users, it brings the incredible breadth of Oracle Solaris enterprise capabilities to the fingertips of OpenStack users.

…and that of course brings to mind some of the above-mentioned Oracle Solaris 11 features, such as built-in, zero-overhead virtualization, a new and super-powerful Unified Archive capability for rapid, safe, compliant deployment, and all the things we’ve done in terms of performance and administrative ease to make Oracle Solaris the best platform for deploying both Oracle’s own and 3rd party software.

So what’s left to do?  In this beta release, you'll find we're taking those capabilities and making them even better.

OpenStack: We’ve moved forward to the OpenStack Juno release, and also done some behind-the-scenes work to make it easy to continue to bring you new OpenStack goodness quickly and reliably.


Virtualization: In Oracle Solaris 11.2, we introduced “Kernel Zones”, making it possible to deliver hypervisor agility while still maintaining the low overhead and ease of administration you expect from Zones.  In 11.3, we introduce secure live migration for Kernel Zones,  live zone reconfiguration, and verified boot.

And, we’ve extended the new Zones on Shared Storage (ZOSS) capabilities.  You can now place zones on FC-SAN, iSCSI, or NFS devices.

Oracle Solaris 11.3 is all about “more”, so now you have more flexibility and more security in your virtualization.

Database: If you’re an Oracle Database fan, you know we’ve been giving you “more” for years: more observability, more performance, more flexible administration.  Now we’re also giving you “less” — less down time.  We’ve slashed database startup and shutdown times.  These are not only faster than it’s ever been on Solaris; it’s faster—a lot faster—than on any other platform.

Security: We’ve extended the compliance capabilities mentioned above, so that you can more easily tailor compliance policy configurations to suit your site’s requirements.  Oracle Solaris and Oracle Solaris Studio are also ready for Software in Silicon application data integrity (ADI).  To learn more about this and start working with it today, visit the SWiS Cloud.

Data Management: You've already come to know and love what Oracle Solaris brings to the table with the first 21st century filesystem, ZFS.  In Oracle Solaris 11.3, we extend its built-in compression capabilities to include LZ4 support, we give you the ability to compare snapshots recursively, and have introduced a wealth of scalability and performance improvements to make it faster than ever. We’ve also enhanced its monitoring features, and upgraded its built-in SMB support.

There’s more than this, but this should give you a taste of what we’ve got in store for you today.  You can download it now, and take a look at the “What’s New” document to see what we’re doing to make your data center cloud-ready, secure, fast, and simple.


Tuesday May 19, 2015

Oracle Database Helps to Premiere New OpenStack Community App Catalog

This morning at the Vancouver summit, the OpenStack Foundation announced its Community App Catalog, a new service that makes it easy for developers to share their applications and developer tools for OpenStack clouds. (Which of course in turn makes it easy for admins to find, obtain and update software.)

We're pleased that one of the charter entries in the catalog is Oracle Database 12c, with the Oracle Multitenant option, making it easy for admins to deploy Pluggable Databases and associated applications.

(If any of this sounds familiar, it's because it's the logical follow-on to the announcement we made on Friday.)

Want to find out more? Talk to the Oracle folks at booth P9 at the Marketplace Expo, and come see Markus Flierl's talk at 2:50 this afternoon, in Room 116/117.

Keep up-to-date year round on all things Oracle OpenStack at the Oracle OpenStack blog.

Monday May 18, 2015

Oracle Solaris and OpenStack Keystone Federated Identity

As this week's OpenStack Summit moves into high gear in Vancouver, the OpenStack Foundation has highlighted a group of companies, including Oracle, that have committed to support the new federated identity capabilities in the upcoming OpenStack Kilo release.

This is yet another step forward in simplifying cloud management and increasing interoperability, goals that are very high on the Oracle Solaris team's priority list.

If you're at the Summit, you can learn more about this announcement and other Oracle Solaris / OpenStack news at booth P9 at the Marketplace Expo.  (And don't forget to attend Solaris VP Markus Flierl's talk at 2:50 tomorrow.)




Friday May 15, 2015

Solaris and Mirantis Simplify OpenStack DBaaS Provisioning

Today Oracle and Mirantis announced a collaboration to make it even easier to use Oracle Solaris and OpenStack for private cloud Database as a Service (DBaaS) deployments, via the OpenStack Murano application catalog project.

Murano is designed to let admins create a library of cloud-ready application services, simplifying the deployment of on-demand services for developers and end users. The combination of enterprise-grade Oracle Solaris and OpenStack as the foundation of these services now gets an ease-of-use boost for people wanting to use Oracle Database 12c and its multitenant capabilities to securely provision multiple Pluggable Databases and applications with just a few clicks.

We'll be demonstrating this next week at the Vancouver OpenStack Summit -- come see the experts at Oracle's booth P9, and Mirantis' booth P7. Also, don't forget to see Markus Flierl's presentation at the summit on Tuesday at 2:50 PM: "Making OpenStack Secure and Compliant for the Enterprise."

This collaboration with Mirantis is the first result of our ongoing work with the community to bring Oracle enterprise applications to OpenStack; keep watching here and on the Oracle OpenStack blog for more news in the future.

Monday Apr 27, 2015

Oracle Solaris at OpenStack Summit in Vancouver

Oracle is a premier sponsor for the upcoming OpenStack Summit in Vancouver.  We'll have representation from teams all over the company -- including Oracle Solaris, of course.  There's going to be lots to share and discover; will you be there?  Register today.

When you're at the conference, be sure to see Oracle Solaris engineering VP Markus Flierl's talk:

Making OpenStack secure and compliant for the enterprise
Tuesday, May 19
2:50 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Room 116 / 117

As you might imagine, security, compliance, and the cloud are hot topics these days, so this promises to be an interesting session.  But we've been working on a lot more than that, so make sure you get a chance to talk with the team to find out what else is in store.  You'll find them at booth P9 on the Marketplace Expo floor.

To stay up-to-date with all things OpenStack at Oracle, be sure to follow the Oracle OpenStack blog.

OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2015
May 18-22, 2015
REGISTER NOW


Friday Apr 24, 2015

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 Call for Proposals: Don't Panic, But...

UPDATE: DEADLINE EXTENDED!  You now have until May 6th!  So, now there's absolutely no reason not to share your story.

 



I don't want to freak you out, but: you're running out of time!


Where'd everybody go?

But it's OK.  Really, it is. Because you can do this.  Trust me.  It's not too late. You've got it.

What do you need to do?  Just send us a simple outline of something cool and Oracle Solaris-related to talk about at the upcoming Oracle OpenWorld conference, taking place October 25-29 in beautiful San Francisco, California.

We're not looking for a paper or a presentation (yet); just your idea.  If it's approved, you get a free conference pass, and the opportunity to hang out with your peers and luminaries from the Oracle development teams, learning lots of valuable insights that will make you a hero to your organization (this is the part you should make sure to stress to your management.)

What are we looking for?  We'd love to hear about ways you've used Oracle Solaris technologies to solve a thorny problem, implement a new service, or help you use other Oracle or non-Oracle products.  Are you an Oracle partner?  Tell everyone how Oracle Solaris and your product saved the day for you and your customers. (If you want to see some of the topics others have presented on, take a look at the Oracle Solaris sessions from 2014.)

These are just some ideas; let them be a springboard for your own creativity. If you've got a great story to tell, we can work with you to help bring it to life at the conference.

Are there more details?  There sure are!  Learn more and sign up at the Oracle OpenWorld Call for Proposals web site.

But you need to do it by Wednesday, April 29th May 6th!  Go!

(Oh, and if you just want to hear all the other great sessions, that's cool, too.  Registration is now open!)


PS: One more tidbit -- 11 Tips on Getting Your Abstract Accepted


Thursday Apr 23, 2015

Webinar: Learn More About Oracle Solaris and Puppet

You may already know that the popular configuration management system Puppet is now integrated into Oracle Solaris (to much excitement).  But do you know everything there is to know about how this can simplify your life?  Here's your chance to find out more.

On this coming Tuesday, April 28, IOUG will be hosting a webinar: Managing Oracle Solaris Systems with Puppet, featuring Glynn Foster from the Oracle Solaris team.  If you're new to Puppet, here's how you can discover more about what it is; if you've been using it with other systems, you can see what's manageable in Oracle Solaris and what the recommended best practices are.

Puppet integration is just one more way that Oracle Solaris 11 continues to simplify enterprise computing, and makes it easier than ever to incorporate Oracle Solaris into your data center.  Register today, and join Glynn on Tuesday to see what's new.


IOUG Webinar: Managing Oracle Solaris Systems with Puppet
Tuesday, April 28, 2015
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PDT
REGISTER NOW

Monday Mar 02, 2015

SPARC: (Still) Not Dead, Since 1989

Okay, I wanted to talk about IEEE's recent event honoring SPARC; but, before I even get started, I should address a couple of points about the title.

First: when I’ve written before about our technology history, I've sometimes been asked, “Should you really be talking about how old such-and-such a thing is?”

Not even a problem here.  As far as current enterprise processors are concerned, SPARC’s still the new kid on the block:

x86? 1978.

Mainframes?  Still around, as you know.  Built on an architecture announced in 1964.

IBM POWER? 1990.

And yes: I see that hand waving frantically in the back: “WAIT!  WAIT!  But why does the title say ’1989’?  Wasn’t SPARC introduced in 1987?!”

Well, yes. Yes, it was. Gold star for you!

But it’s been not dead since 1989.

A PROUD TRADITION OF BEING NOT AT ALL DEAD CONTINUES

In 1989, I'd just joined Sun, after several years as a customer.  I was of course up on all the news about the brand new SPARCstation 1, and I was excited to learn what was coming next.

Which was a full-frontal assault from our competitors.

Not to blame them; I mean, here we were, the fairly-new guys (only 5 years old at the time SPARC was announced)—and we dared to come out with an entirely new processor architecture?

And this is where, two years in, we started to hear people (well, our competitors) say: SPARC is dead!  Never going anywhere.

HP was probably the leader in death-knell pronouncements, because they’d just bought Apollo, which had a line of "SPARC-killer" workstations based on the PRISM processor.  Those faded out right about the same time I found out where the coffee supplies were in the office.

But that’s OK, because HP had a new line of “Snake” workstations, which would totally crush SPARC!  Those did a bit better; the underlying chip hung on long enough to become the processor that HP killed in favor of Itanium.  SPARC-crushing: not so much.

Next up was DEC Alpha, which was—you guessed it—going to be the end of SPARC.  (My favorite DEC presentation tidbit from back in the day: the transition from VAX to Alpha was going to be E-Z ...because they could both read the same plaintext data files !  I’m not making this up.)  Alpha’s still around, technically, as is Itanium.  SPARC killing, though: not achieved.

But there’s more to this story than just sheer survival—SPARC has a habit of becoming the leader in technologies other companies had to scramble to match: RISC computing, extreme chip multithreading, and now Software in Silicon.  SPARC stays not-dead the way any technology does: continuous innovation.

OK… but what’s the next reason for it to be not-dead?

How about four?

FOUR REASONS TO BET ON SPARC


1. Oracle and this other guy named Larry


A lot of people were skeptical—very skeptical—about what was going to happen to Sun’s hardware business after the acquisition.  (That’s OK; some of us at Sun were kind of interested in that, too.)

Larry Ellison answered that pretty boldly on the day the deal closed, laying out a roadmap for SPARC/Solaris systems.  How’d we do on that? Not too bad:


Oracle’s strategy is to be in a business for the long haul, and nothing shows that more dramatically than what has happened with SPARC since then—moving beyond “not dead” to “holy…”.  Oracle’s intensified efforts on both SPARC and Solaris are demonstrably paying off, in a big way, at the same time our main enterprise competitors seem to have lost their way.

2. RISC

RISC—Reduced Instruction Set Computing—was a then-obscure concept that Bill Joy championed in the mid-‘80s, resulting in Sun developing the SPARC architecture.  The idea’s very simple: bet your silicon real estate on the instructions that do you the most good.  As big an idea as that was then, it’s even bigger now.

Here’s why: it’s the best way to deal in silicon with a reality we’ve been living for decades: most compute tasks today are ludicrously over-provisioned on a single processor.  An architecture based on simplified processing units lets you put more flexible compute on a single chip, for less money, less power, less cooling.

By putting more compute units on a single chip, instead of deploying a lot of low-performance systems in your data center, with redundant support hardware, you can now put all that compute in a more cost-effective system.  You drive down cost yet further, and you drive down latency, the real enemy of performance today.

3. Writing to a chip?  You still do that?

Back when I joined Sun, rolling out a new processor architecture was considered to be audacious.  Building a whole new ecosystem was challenging, and optimizations for a particular chip/OS combination were hard-fought battles only won by the most brilliant developers.  

This hasn’t completely gone away, but it’s not what you, the developer/operator, do any more.  You’re going to chunk away at much higher layers of abstraction, and let our campus full of folks in Santa Clara take care of the optimizations.  Our deal with you is: we’ll build and co-engineer awesome hardware, operating systems, software and developer suites, and you use it to build, run, and maintain the services you need.

Bottom line: if you can do it, you can do it on SPARC.  And what we do makes it better.

4. Solaris

You didn’t think I was going to miss that one, did you?  This is a Solaris blog, after all.

The combination of chip multithreading and virtualization has turned the concept of data center performance exactly upside down.  Instead of worrying about how to get enough power to a single application, the challenge is to how to get enough applications onto the power you have.

SPARC/Solaris solves this challenge brilliantly, with an unmatched combination of enterprise dependability and cloud agility.  The strengths that have made Solaris the “go to” OS for enterprise computing continue to get even better, and now we bake in things like OpenStack, built-in virtualization, SDN, and compliance tools to make your life easier, and your applications rock-solid and wicked fast.

ONWARD TO THE SECOND INNING

There's a tendency to think that we're always at the end of the game, when we're really only in the first inning.  If you look at the history of SPARC, you see competitors who wanted customers to think the game was over, before most of the crowd had even settled in their seats.

A few days ago, IEEE celebrated the beginning of SPARC, and that gives us a chance to talk about where that's going to take us. Keep in mind, this isn’t the 9th inning of the compute era. SPARC’s more than just “not dead”—it’s just getting rolling.

Learn more:

Monday Feb 09, 2015

February 11, 2015: Developers Virtual Technology Summit

If you're familiar with the Oracle Technology Network's Virtual Sysadmin Days that have been held in the past, you know a bit about what this is about: a series of hands-on, proctored labs brought straight to your desktop on the web.

But did you know they've expanded in scope? Of particular interest to enterprise developers is that this time around, there's a track aimed straight at you.

This Wednesday, February 11th, Oracle will be holding a Virtual Technology Summit, and one of the tracks is on Oracle Solaris Studio.  That means you can go through a live, hands-on exercise with experts standing by to help you out, from the comfort of your home, office, or coffeehouse -- anywhere you can sit down and connect up.

Of note in this session: hands-on experience with the Code Analyzer for software analysis, and the Performance Analyzer for optimizing application performance.

Just as before, this event is free, although you do need to register, and there is some prep work you need to do beforehand, including downloading a virtual image.  Rick Ramsey explains what you need to know and do at the OTN Garage blog.

This day's event will run from 9 AM to 12:30 PM Pacific time, but click through to the registration page to see upcoming event dates that will run at times that may be more appropriate for your location (or circadian rhythms).

(By the way: not a C, C++ or Fortran kind of developer? Check out the parallel tracks on database, middleware and Java.)

Sign up now and start your prework, and join us on Wednesday!

Oracle Technology Network
Virtual Technology Summit

Wednesday February 11, 2015
9:00am (PST) / 12:30pm (EST)
REGISTER NOW


Saturday Jan 31, 2015

10 at 10

Can it have been so long already?  Today is the 10th anniversary of the first release of Solaris 10. This was a breakthrough release for Solaris, Sun, and really, the industry -- it breathed new life into a class of systems software that some companies had written off long before.  How did it do that?  By including a wealth of groundbreaking new features that raised the bar for what an enterprise operating system should be.  To use one of my favorite phrases: innovation matters, and the operating system is too critical a place in the application delivery stack not to innovate.

Many of these features are still ahead of the curve even 10 years later, and form the core of yet more innovation in Oracle Solaris 11: Zones and ZFS in particular stand out as enabling technologies that give our customers the power of zero-overhead virtualization, "nineteen 9s" data integrity, and simple, fast, reliable provisioning and service management.  If you look at the underpinnings of OpenStack as deployed in Oracle Solaris 11 today, innovation that's still fresh from Solaris 10 will be staring right back at you.  And it's exciting to see that the same fundamental concepts like these that we thought were important to build into the OS in 2005 are starting to come into vogue with operating systems from other companies just ten short years later.

Thanks to everyone who has contributed to the success of Solaris 10 and beyond!


Wednesday Nov 12, 2014

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 Solaris Presentations Now Available

Another Oracle OpenWorld is over, and as usual, there was a lot to take in.  Markus Flierl had a great recap, covering what we said about Oracle Solaris, as did Rick O'Herron over on the Oracle Hardware blog, summarizing what's happening with SPARC M7.

Whether or not you got to attend this year, you might want to take a look at the presentations, which are now posted for many of the sessions.  You can go to the entire content catalog (a mere 2,800+ sessions for OpenWorld and JavaOne!), or drill down to just the Oracle Solaris-related sessions via our ever-popular Focus on Oracle Solaris guide.

Here's a last look at some of this year's people, places, and performances (you can click through to a gallery of the images, if you're so inclined).  Hope you can join us next year!

Tuesday Nov 11, 2014

Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4 Now Available: Create Powerful, Efficient, Secure Applications

The latest release of Oracle’s #1 C, C++ and Fortran development environment, Oracle Solaris Studio 12.4, is now available for building world-class applications for Oracle Solaris and Linux systems.  If you've been following along during the beta program, you already know that there are several significant new features, including support for C++11 and OpenMP 4.0.

There's also a complete redesign of the Performance Analyzer, providing a powerful window into the workings of your application with the ability to do remote and cross-platform analysis, simplifying your life as a developer and allowing you to create high-performance code from the client system of your choice, targeting SPARC or x86 servers.

Also sure to be on the top of any developer's mind (and if not, why not?) is code vulnerability protection.  You want your apps to make a stir in a good way, which is usually not on CNN at the top of every hour.  The Code Analyzer gives you the ability to detect and correct memory leaks and access issues before you unleash your code on the world.  This is top-notch stuff found nowhere else, providing unique ways to increase code coverage and make your services more reliable.

And of course, the compilers' ability to deliver just plain flat-out application performance has always been a prime reason why developers choose Oracle Solaris Studio over alternatives, and this release has leading-edge optimizations for the latest SPARC and x86 based platforms, including Oracle’s SPARC M6 and T5 systems, and Intel Haswell-based systems.  We've seen 4.8 times the performance on industry standard benchmarks compared to other compilers you might be using.  Picking the right development tools can make a much bigger difference than you might have thought!

And... even though price might not be your most important concern, it's still kind of nice that all this is free to download, for production use and the development of commercial applications.

About

Security. Speed. Simplicity.
An efficient, open, affordable cloud platform for SPARC and x86 systems.

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