Tuesday Sep 16, 2014

People Shopping: Social HR and Recruiting

social media for recruiting“We have an opening.  I’d better start looking for somebody.” If those words ever ran through your head, you confirmed you’re already behind the 8-ball when it comes to social HR and social recruiting.


Today, you should ALWAYS be scouting and courting talent. It’s a perpetual process, and because it is, social is at the forefront of it. Social is the means for pretty much everything involved; referral, discovery, connecting, research, vetting, selling the virtues of the employer, reading recommendations, answering questions, gauging cultural fit, etc.


Just as transformative social technologies are being used for marketing, so too can those same powers be turned on recruitment. We’re talking about targeting, amplification, listening, moderation & engagement, and social data analysis. These are the things that will keep a flow of quality choices in the hiring funnel.


Of course, a solid argument can be made that if you’re in recruiting, you’re in marketing. Spherion Staffing’s study says 47% of Millennials think an employer’s online rep matters as much as the job itself. The truly qualified have more than enough choices, and they don’t want to be embarrassed to say whom they work for. The worst circumstance, of course, is that your competition has been connected to and engaging with all the real winners for months.


The sooner you determine the skillset you’re most in need of, target the online locales most frequented by such workers, and start monitoring the signals their activity is sending, the sooner you can connect and engage in relevant ways…whether the person is currently actively looking for a job change or not. And while you’re at it, do that with visual content that’s mobile optimized. Only 20% of F500 companies even have a mobile-optimized career site. Bad plan.


To get social HR and social recruiting right, you not only need the tech infrastructure and strategy, you need HR staffers that “get it” and are social themselves. The number of HR jobs requiring social skills is up 43% year to year. But a CIPD Resourcing and Talent Planning survey shows over a third of HR respondents said that while they do use social, they aren’t really sure how to maximize it.


Now that puts you in a pickle. Who in HR is going to teach employees how to help recruiting efforts via social contact referrals? Who’s going to lead the drive to implement social for internal communication and collaboration? Who’s listening across social and the web to what’s being said about the company by employees and non-employees alike? Who’s being consistently active on the professional communities, forums and groups where quality prospects can be found?


And those are just the basics. Social can have profound implications in HR in areas beyond recruitment and hiring such as employee reviews, goal setting & tracking, and training/certification. But just as the often-difficult revolution we’ve seen take place in marketing called for team members in that department to rise to the occasion and assume new disciplines and broader responsibilities, so too must HR firmly plant their feet and execute its role in fostering the social-enabled enterprise.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: Alexander Wallnfer, freeimages.com

Friday Sep 12, 2014

Essentials of an Employee Social Media Policy

social media employee policyThere’s still a lot of fear out there around employees’ use of social media related to their company of employment. Employees are scared to mention the company for fear of doing something wrong. That’s not good. Brands want and need employees to be the first wave of social message amplifiers and engagers.


Companies are afraid an employee post referencing the company will lead to a humiliating PR nightmare. That’s not good either. With the content fire hose wide open and as hard as it is to get your brand noticed on social, restrained marketing rooted in fear is a sure path to #fail.


So below are some terms you may want to include in your company’s social “rules of the road.” Having such guideposts in place helps the company and its employees understand each other’s wants and concerns so that mutually beneficial activity can comfortably proceed.


  • We encourage all employees to follow company social channels and actively engage on those channels. Additionally, we ask that you set the preferences on your social channels and devices to receive notifications when a post goes out from the company’s social channels.


  • We encourage all employees to share official company social posts and content on their own social channels. When adding comments to such content, employees are expected to use sound judgment in not criticizing or being counter productive to the messaging the company is trying to communicate. If you have questions or criticisms of the messaging, please address with your immediate supervisor FIRST.


  • The more you use your personal social channels to mention the company and share its content, the more guarded you are requested to be in how you present yourself overall on your social channels. Please respect and be aware of the fact that during the time of your employment, you are a representative of the company. This is actually a sound practice that should help you professionally, regardless of your employment with our company.


  • Please always use proper, widely acceptable, non-offensive language and terminology in any posts you make on your personal social channels that also mention the company.


  • Please refrain from posting any news or imagery from or about the company on your personal social channels if you have any doubts whatsoever such material is not cleared for public release. This includes product rollouts, product improvements, policy changes, etc. Immediacy of posting is not required such that there isn’t time to check with a supervisor first and make sure employees are clear to talk about the subject in question.


  • Please refrain from engaging in any discussion with or about a company competitor on your personal social channels. Simply direct such conversations exclusively to our company’s products, solutions and benefits.


  • We ask that you take with the highest level of seriousness and consideration any request by the company to immediately remove a post on your personal social channels that inappropriately mentions the company, runs counter to privacy policies or embargoes, or is factually incorrect.


  • We want you to be a sincere, transparent, enthused ambassador for our brand. If there are reasons you are reluctant to be publicly associated with the company or product, and if you feel comfortable doing so, please discuss the origins of this reluctance with a supervisor. We see this as a learning opportunity for us in how the workplace or product can be significantly improved.


  • We encourage you to report conversations of note about the company that you encounter on your personal social channels to the brand’s social manager. While we do have a social monitoring and engagement platform in place, it’s always helpful to have such conversations called to our attention to insure proper engagement.


  • As active social channel users in your personal lives, you are particularly experienced in what type of content, especially from brands, captures your attention and wins your engagement. We encourage you to submit content to the brand’s social manager for possible posting on the company’s channels, be it a tweet, image, video, poll, curated content, or original blog post.


  • The company allows access to social network sites, including personal social network sites, onsite during the workday so employees can remain connected and in communication. We ask that you honor this policy by consistently and regularly using that access to help amplify the company’s messaging and stimulate engagement with the brand’s posts.


  • If you have any questions regarding proper usage of your personal social channels when referencing the company, please consult your supervisor or the brand’s social manager before publicly posting.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: Krzysztof Szkurlatowski, freeimages.com

Friday May 30, 2014

Are Chief Digital Officers the Result of CMO/CIO Refusal to Change?

Apparently CDO no longer just stands for “Collateralized Debt Obligations.”  It stands for Chief Digital Officer. And they’re the ones who are supposed to answer the bat signal CEO’s are throwing into the sky, swoop in and POW! drive the transition of the enterprise to integrated digital systems.


So imagine being a CMO or a CIO at such an enterprise and realizing it’s been determined that you are not the answer that’s needed. In fact, IntelligentHQ author Ashley Friedlein points out the very rise of the CDO is an admission of C-Suite failure to become savvy enough, quickly enough in modern technology.


Is that fair?


Despite the repeated drumbeat that CMO’s and CIO’s must enter a new era of cooperation and collaboration to enact the social-enabled enterprise, the verdict seems to be that if it’s happening at all, it’s not happening fast enough. Therefore, someone else is needed with the authority to make things happen.


So who is this relatively new beast? Gartner VP David Willis says, “The Chief Digital Officer plays in the place where the enterprise meets the customer, where the revenue is generated, and the mission accomplished.” In other words, where the rubber meets the road. They aren’t just another “C” heading up a unit. They’re the CEO’s personal SWAT team, able to call the shots necessary across all units to affect what has become job one…customer experience.


And what are the CMO’s and CIO’s doing while this is going on? Playing corporate games. Accenture reports 38% of CMOs say IT deliberately keeps them out of the loop, with 35% saying marketing’s needs aren’t a very high priority. 31% of CIOs say marketers don’t understand tech and regularly go around them for solutions. Fun!


Meanwhile the CEO feels the need to bring in a parental figure to pull it all together. Gartner thinks 25% of all orgs will have a CDO by 2015 as CMO’s and particularly CIO’s (Peter Hinssen points out many CDO’s are coming “from anywhere but IT”) let the opportunity to be the agent of change their company needs slip away.


Perhaps most interestingly, these CDO’s seem to be entering the picture already on the fast track. One consultancy counted 7 instances of a CDO moving into the CEO role, which, as this Wired article points out, is pretty astounding since nobody ever heard of the job a few years ago. And vendors are quickly figuring out that this is the person they need to be talking to inside the brand.


The position isn’t without its critics. Forrester’s Martin Gill says the reaction from executives at some traditional companies to someone being brought in to be in charge of digital might be to wash their own hands of responsibility for all things digital – a risky maneuver given the pervasiveness of digital in business.


They might not even be called Chief Digital Officers. They might be the Chief Customer Officer, Chief Experience Officer, etc. You can call them Twinkletoes if you want to, but essentially anyone who has the mandate direct from the CEO to enact modern technology changes not currently being championed by the CMO or CIO can be regarded as “boss.”


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

Tuesday Dec 04, 2012

How to Set Up Your Enterprise Social Organization

The rush for business organizations to establish, grow, and adopt social was driven out of necessity and inevitability. The result, however, was a sudden, booming social presence creating touch points with customers, partners and influencers, but without any corporate social organization or structure in place to effectively manage it.

Even today, many business leaders remain uncertain as to how to corral this social media thing so that it makes sense for their enterprise.

Imagine their panic when they hear one of the most beneficial approaches to corporate use of social involves giving up at least some hierarchical control and empowering employees to publicly engage customers. And beyond that, they should also be empowered, regardless of their corporate status, to engage and collaborate internally, spurring “off the grid” innovation.

An HBR blog points out that traditionally, enterprise organizations function from the top down, and employees work end-to-end, structured around business processes. But the social enterprise opens up structures that up to now have not exactly been embraced by turf-protecting executives and managers. The blog asks, “What if leaders could create a future where customers, associates and suppliers are no longer seen as objects in the system but as valued sources of innovation, ideas and energy?”

What if indeed? The social enterprise activates internal resources without the usual obsession with position. It is the dawn of mass collaboration.

That does not, however, mean this mass collaboration has to lead to uncontrolled chaos. In an extended interview with Oracle, Altimeter Group analyst Jeremiah Owyang and Oracle SVP Reggie Bradford paint a complete picture of today’s social enterprise, including internal organizational structures Altimeter Group has seen emerge.

One sign of a mature social enterprise is the establishing of a social Center of Excellence (CoE), which serves as a hub for high-level social strategy, training and education, research, measurement and accountability, and vendor selection. This CoE is led by a corporate Social Strategist, most likely from a Marketing or Corporate Communications background.

Reporting to them are the Community Managers, the front lines of customer interaction and engagement; business unit liaisons that coordinate the enterprise; and social media campaign/product managers, social analysts, and developers. With content rising as the defining factor for social success, Altimeter also sees a Content Strategist position emerging.

dandelion modelAcross the enterprise, Altimeter has seen 5 organizational patterns. Watching the video will give you the pros and cons of each.

Decentralized - Anyone can do anything at any time on any social channel.

Centralized – One central groups controls all social communication for the company.

Hub and Spoke – A centralized group, but business units can operate their own social under the hub’s guidance and execution. Most enterprises are using this model.

Dandelion – Each business unit develops their own social strategy & staff, has its own ability to deploy, and its own ability to engage under the central policies of the CoE.

Honeycomb – Every employee can do social, but as opposed to the decentralized model, it’s coordinated and monitored on one platform.

The average enterprise has a whopping 178 social accounts, nearly ¼ of which are usually semi-idle and need to be scrapped. The last thing any C-suite needs is to cope with fragmented technologies, solutions and platforms. It’s neither scalable nor strategic.

The prepared, effective social enterprise has a technology partner that can quickly and holistically integrate emerging platforms and technologies, such that whatever internal social command structure you’ve set up can continue efficiently executing strategy without skipping a beat.

@mikestiles

Tuesday Nov 27, 2012

Social HCM: Is Your Team Listening?

Word BalloonsDoes integrating Social HCM into your enterprise make sense? Consider Sam and Christina.

Sam is a new hire at a big company. On the job 3 weeks, a question has come up on how to properly file an expense report to get reimbursed. It was covered in the onboarding session, but shockingly enough, Sam didn’t memorize or write down every word of the session. The answer is probably in a handout, in a stack of handouts 2 inches thick. It also might be on the employee web site…somewhere.

Christina is a new hire at a different big company. She has the same question. She logs into her company’s social network, goes to the “new hires” group, asks her question and gets an answer in seconds.

Christina says, “Cool!” Sam says, “Grrrr.” It’s safe to say the qualified talent your company wants is accustomed to using social platforms to communicate and get quick answers. As such, Christina is comfortable at her new company, whereas Sam is wondering what he’s gotten himself into.

Companies that cling to talent communication and management systems that don’t speak to talent’s needs or expectations put themselves at risk. Right from the recruiting stage, prospects can determine if a company has embraced the communications tools of the 21st century. If they don’t see it, alarm bells go off. With great talent more in demand than ever, enterprises should reconsider making “this is the way we do it, you adapt to us” their mantra.

Other blogs have clearly outlined that apart from meeting top recruits’ expectations, Social HCM benefits the organization itself in terms of efficiency, talent performance & measurement.

Recruiting:
Jobvite shows 64% of companies hired using social. 89% of job seekers are using social in their search. Social can give employers access to relevant communities of prospects and advance the brand. Nucleus Research found general hiring software can provide over 1,000% ROI by reducing churn and improving screening. Social talent acquisition should perform at least as well.

Learning & Development:
Employees, learning from the company or from peers, can be kept on top of the latest needed skillsets and engage in self-paced training so as to advance within the company.

Performance Management:
Just as gamers are egged on by levels and achievements, talent can reach for workplace kudos, be they shout-outs from peers & managers or formally established milestones. Plus employee reviews become consistent and fair as managers have access to the cumulative feedback social offers.

Workflow and Collaboration:
With workforces dispersing in terms of physical location, social provides a platform that helps eliminate drawbacks that would have brought just 10 years ago. Finding and connecting with just the right colleague to get the most relevant info at any given time has never been more possible…or expected.

While yes, marketing has taken the social lead inside the enterprise, HCM (with the word “human” right there in its name) is the obvious locale for the next big integration of social in business. The technology is there. At Oracle, Fusion HCM apps are deeply embedded with Social HCM…just one example of systems taking social across the enterprise.

Christina’s company is communicating with her in ways she’s used to. Sam’s company may as well be trying to talk to him using signal flags.

@mikestiles
Photo via stock.xchng

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