Friday Aug 29, 2014

10 Reasons Why Your Social Brand Content Might Be Boooring

Back in the day (whatever day that was), the race was to establish a presence on social and collect lots of fans & followers.  Then everything became about social media engagement. To get it, your posts had to be visible. That’s when the social networks started caring…a lot…about monetizing.


Now, social has backed itself into being…TV advertising, but with added burdens. Social marketers now do what TV advertisers have always done; pay to get their content possibly seen. Whether the TV ad “worked” or got buzz depended on how entertaining, catchy, or compelling it was. So it is today with social brand content.


It’s not enough to be on. It’s not enough to be seen. Your content has to be awesome enough to inspire social’s added burden: the like, comment, and share. Nobody ever asked a viewer to go kiss their TV if they liked the ad they saw. But that’s what social asks.


Additional burden #2 is that social is a 24/7, two-way pipeline brands must fill with…something. The call for quality does not go down, while the call for quantity skyrockets. Caught in those crosshairs, several things may be conspiring to keep your social brand content boring and thus, not worthy of engagement.


1. You Can’t Keep Up With the Volume Needed

Content marketing wouldn’t be happening if content consumption weren’t going up. If you don’t fill that News Feed, others will be more than happy to and keep you shut out.


2. You Refuse to Shift Your Staffing Search

It’s the reason you can’t keep up with the volume needed. You’ve got marketers that can do the occasional deck and white paper. You’re not seeking prolific creators, entertainers and journalists.


3. You Continue to Try to Commoditize Today’s Most In-Demand Skills

If you do find those prolific content-generators, you want to lowball them. If “anyone can do it,” then you should probably start doing it yourself and really save some money.


4. You Aren’t Listening, or Watching, or Caring, or Asking

Any content creator knows the first thing you should do is know who your audience is. Tech listening and engagement tools remove the excuse to stay in the dark. Love what they love, care about what they care about, tune in to them, be one of them.


5. You Are Ignorant to the Content Competition Out There

I’m not talking about the content your competition is posting, I’m talking about the universe of viewing/listening options we all have at any given moment. You are entitled to nothing. You have to earn every scrap of attention your content gets.


6. You’re Still Banking on One-Offs Instead of “Shows”

What content can your social fans/followers rely on you to give them on a regular basis, without fail? Get them into a habit of consumption. They have no obligation to come around only when you’re ready to give them something.


7. You’re Playing to Internal Corporate Forces, Not the Real World

Does your C-suite know content? Do they know how to pull in, hold, delight, and impassion the public? Have they ever done it? If your content is aimed at pleasing them, you can be almost 100% guaranteed your social fans’ eyes are glazing over.


8. Your Company isn’t Shifting Resources to Content

If you’re fighting yesterday’s marketing war, that’s nostalgic. Maybe you could open a museum or something. Or hey, maybe people will stop wanting to watch things on their phones and brand content will just go away.


9. Your Brand Just Isn’t Cool. Like…at All

It’s not that people won’t share. AOL & Nielsen found 27 million pieces of content are shared daily. Ipsos says 70% of Internet users share content regularly. But when people share brand content, they’re publicly identifying with the brand and defining a part of themselves. You can’t afford not to have an overall cool image.


10. You Aren’t Doing Enough Newsworthy Things

Why would anyone share your content “just because”? If you’ve made legitimate news, people feel useful to their followers by sharing that news. If you’re not creating, innovating, launching, doing something…then it’s hard to make a ripple.


Forrester learned that on 6 of the 7 social networks, social brand content gets an engagement rate of under 0.1%. A Business Review Weekly piece talked to users about why they ignore brand content. One replied, “It’s an ad. . .and they never say anything funny or interesting.” You wrote the check, you got it seen, but for whatever reason, you found the quality of the content itself completely expendable. Yawn.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freeimages.com

Tuesday Aug 26, 2014

An Engaging Experience at CRM Evolution 2014

Our guest post today is from Oracle Social Cloud Group VP Meg Bear, fresh off presenting at the CRM Evolution event. With seismic technology shifts taking place in CRM, we wanted to get her take on what she heard and saw.


What a fun week! CRM Evolution wasn’t just a great experience; it was a truly engaging event. The reason I say that is many of the conversations at the event were around best practices for customer experience and customer engagement. Thanks to the amazing Ray Wang for summarizing the discussion so concisely!


Buzzwords aside, I was happy to see the focus on engagement and I believe there are two key distinctions between the concepts. Firstly, engagement suggests an ongoing relationship, versus a one-time experience. Importantly, engagement makes it clear that the customer is in control and the actions taken by an organization, only impact the outcome.


CRM EvolutionWhat made CRM Evolution 2014 such a great experience and so engaging, you may ask? Well, it wasn’t the view from the windowless press/analyst room I spent most of my day in that’s for sure. The amazing conversations I was lucky enough to join (and of course the hugs!) make this “THE” event for those who care deeply about this industry.


I shared fascinating discussions with the delightful Paul Greenberg. Paul has an amazing ability to bring people together (as he clearly showed in his role as CRM Evolution Conference chair) and hosted a panel on the growing importance of customer engagement that I joined. Not content with lifting the curtain on the increasingly small distinction between “social CRM” and traditional CRM systems, Paul asked complex and insightful questions about business, social and customer engagement. I was honored to participate.


And it wasn’t just Paul. My visit was enriched by a large number of industry veterans sharing their experiences. Denis Pombriant kindly took the time to share his presentation with me even though I was double booked during his session; Brian Vellmure and I talked for so long that I made him late for a Yankees game (sorry, Brian!); and I waited for but did not get coffee (to say the “experience” at the hotel Café could have used a little investment would be an understatement) with the one and only Brent Leary. Any minute spent getting Michael Krigsman’s take on the state of things is always a minute well spent. And that’s not to mention the countless other conversations I had with some of the best people in the industry including Marshall Lager.


One of the things I was talking about was how the right user experience can increase customer engagement. As with the introduction of Social Station, a cool new workstation within Oracle Social Cloud, we now provide a next-gen user experience that drives productivity and social business results. It was great to see some of the initial reaction and read what Maria Minsker (CRM Magazine), Natalie Gagliordi (ZDNet), Tom Murphy (CMSWire), Omar Akhtar (The Hub) and others had to say about the latest enhancements.


By making it easier than ever to understand, report and share social insights across the enterprise, Social Station helps our customers move at the speed of social. And that’s not just a nice to have. That type of agility is a must-have if organizations are to engage customers in a way that has a positive and tangible impact on business results.


So thanks to Paul, the rest of CRM Evolution team and everyone that took the time to meet and speak with me. I hope to see many of you at Oracle OpenWorld next month and perhaps while I am there, I will get my very own selfie with Ray Wang.



@oraclesocial

Friday Aug 22, 2014

Customization: It’s Wanted in Enterprise Tech Platforms Too

social media managementDid you know that every customer service person does their job the exact same way in every business organization?  And did you know that every business organization cares about the exact same metrics? I hope not, because both those things couldn’t be farther from the truth. And if there are different needs and approaches in different enterprises, it stands to reason technology platforms must become increasingly customizable.


Oracle Social Cloud sees that coming and is doing something about it, at least in terms of social media management. Today we introduce Social Station, a customizable user experience workspace within the Oracle Social Relationship Management (SRM) platform.


We think a lot about customer-centricity and customer experience around here, and we know our own customers are ready to start moving forward in being able to set up their work environments in the ways that work best for them. That kind of thing increases productivity, helps deliver on social objectives faster, and generally just makes life more pleasant.


A recent IDG Enterprise report says that enterprises currently investing in more consumerized, easy-to-use technologies experience a 56% increase in employee productivity and a 46% increase in customer satisfaction. Imagine that. When you make it easier and more pleasant for employees to help customers, more customers get helped and everyone ends up happier.

social media analytics

So what does this Social Station do and what does it mean, exactly? It’s an innovative move to take some pretty high-end tech (take a bow developers) and simplify it, making things more intuitive:


  • Drag and drop lets you easily build out and personalize your social workspace with different modules.
  • The new Custom Analytics module can mix and match over 120 metrics with thousands of customizable reporting options. You can check constantly refreshed updates and keep a real-time eye on the numbers you’re trying to move.
  • One-click sharing and annotation in the Custom Analytics module improves sharing and collaboration across teams, departments and executives.
  • Multi-view layout helps you leverage social insights by letting you monitor conversations by network, stream, metric, graph type, date range, and relative time period.
  • The Enhanced Calendar is a better visual representation of content, posts, networks and views, letting you easily toggle between functions and views.
  • The Oracle Social Station sets us up to always be developing & launching additional social modules for you, covering areas like content curation, influencer engagement, and command center creation.

social media management

Oracle Social Cloud Group VP Meg Bear says, “Consumers today have high expectations of their technology application capabilities and usability, and those expectations don’t stop when they enter their workplaces.” In other words, internal enterprise technology platforms must reflect the personalization and customization being called for in consumer products and marketing.


“One size fits all” is becoming an endangered concept.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial

Tuesday Aug 19, 2014

So You Want to Be a Social Media Director

social media directorDo you want to be a Social Media Director? Some say the title is already losing its relevance; that social should be a basic skill that is required and used no matter what your position is inside the enterprise.


I suppose that’s visionary, and a fun thing for thought leaders to say. But in the vast majority of business organizations, we’re so far away from that reality that the thought of not having someone driving social’s implementation and guiding its proper usage conjures up images of anarchy.


That said, social media has become so broad, so catch-all, and so extended across business functions, that today’s Social Media Director, depending on the size of their staff, must make jacks-of-all-trades look like one-trick-ponies. Just as the purview of the CMO has grown all-encompassing, the disciplines required of their heads of social are stacking up.


Master of Content

Every social pipeline you build must stay filled, with quantity and quality. Content takes time, and the job never stops. Never. And no, it’s not true that anybody can write.


Master of Customer Experience

You must have a passion for hearing from customers and making them really happy.


Master of PR

You must know how to communicate and leverage the trust you’ve built when crises strike. Couldn’t hurt to be a Master of Politics.


Master of Social Technology

So many social management tools on the market. You have to know what social tech ecosystem makes sense and avoid piecemeal point solutions.


Master of Business Development

Social for selling and prospecting is hot, and you have to know how to use social to do it.


Master of Analytics

Nothing else matters if you can’t prove social is helping the brand. That’s right, creative content guy has to also be a math and stats geek. Good luck with that.


Master of Paid Media

You’ve got to learn the language, learn the tactics, learn the vendors and learn how to measure results.


Master of Education

Guess who gets to teach everyone who has no clue how to use social for business.


Master of Personal Likability

You’ll be leading the voice, tone, image and personality of the brand. If you don’t instinctively know how to be liked by actual people, the brand will be starting from a deficit.


How deep must you go in this parade of masteries? Again, that depends on your employer’s maturity level in social. Serious players recognize these as distinct disciplines requiring true experts for maximum effect. Less serious players will need you to execute personally in many of these areas. Do the best you can, and try to grow quickly at each.


If you’re the sole person executing all social…well…you’re in the game of managing expectations and trying to socially educate your employer. The good news is, you should be making a certifiable killing. If you’re alone and your salary is modest, time to understand how many brands out there crave what you’ve mastered. Not to push back against thought leaders, but the need for brand social leadership has not gone away…not even a little bit.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: Stefan Wagner, freeimages.com




Friday Aug 15, 2014

Alert: It is No Longer 1982, So Why is CRM Still There?

Hot off the heels of Oracle’s recent LinkedIn integration announcement and Oracle Marketing Cloud Interact 2014, the Oracle Social Cloud is preparing for another big event, the CRM Evolution conference and exhibition in NYC. The role of social channels in customer engagement continues to grow, and social customer engagement will be a significant theme at the conference.


According to Paul Greenberg, CRM Evolution Conference Chair, author, and Managing Principal at The 56 Group, social channels have become so pervasive that there is no longer a clear reason to make a distinction between “social CRM” and traditional CRM systems.


Why not? Because social is a communication hub every bit as vital and used as the phone or email. What makes social different is that if you think of it as a phone, it’s a party line. That means customer interactions are far from secret, and social connections are listening in by the hundreds, hearing whether their friend is having a positive or negative experience with your brand.


According to a Mention.com study, 76% of brand mentions are neutral, neither positive nor negative. These mentions fail to get much notice. So think what that means about the remaining 24% of mentions. They’re standing out, because a verdict, about you, is being rendered in them, usually with emotion. Suddenly, where the R of CRM has been lip service and somewhat expendable in the past, “relationship” takes on new meaning, seriousness, and urgency.


Remarkably, legions of brands still approach CRM as if it were 1982. Today, brands must provide customer experiences the customer actually likes (how dare they expect such things). They must intimately know not only their customers, but each customer, because technology now makes personalized experiences possible.


That’s why the Oracle Social Cloud has been so mission-oriented about seamlessly integrating social with sales, marketing and customer service interactions so the enterprise can have an actionable 360-degree view of the customer. It’s the key to that customer-centricity we hear so much about these days.


If you’re attending CRM Evolution, Chris Moody, Director of Product Marketing for the Oracle Marketing Cloud, will show you how unified customer experiences and enhanced customer centricity will help you attract and keep ideal customers and brand advocates (“The Pursuit of Customer-Centricity” Aug 19 at 2:45p ET)


And Meg Bear, Group Vice President for the Oracle Social Cloud, will sit on a panel talking about “terms of engagement” and the ways tech can now enhance your interactions with customers (Aug 20 at 10a ET).


If you can’t be there, we’ll be doing our live-tweeting thing from the @oraclesocial handle, so make sure you’re a faithful follower. You’ll notice NOBODY is writing about the wisdom of “company-centricity.” Now is the time to bring your customer relationship management into the socially connected age.


@mikestiles
Photo: Sue Pizarro, freeimages.com

Tuesday Aug 12, 2014

5 Things Brands Should Learn From the Rise of YouTube Celebrities

YouTube social media contentTV actors used to worry about reality show stars stealing their thunder and opportunities.  Ah what quaint days those were. Turns out the no-names doing seemingly brainless stuff as YouTube “celebrities” loomed as the larger dinosaur-killing catastrophic threat.


We present as evidence a recent survey commissioned by Variety, the traditional film/TV industry’s legendary trade publication. It showed that as far as US teens 13-18 are concerned, the faces they watch on YouTube are more important and influential to them than Sheldon, Leonard & Penny.


No, those actors aren’t hurting (just renegotiated huge new per episode deals). But much of a star’s value is in their ability to sell stuff. And that’s where YouTube celebrities are shining, ranking sky high on traits like engaging, approachable, authentic, and relatable. They even hold their own in sex appeal vs. the glitterati. Their fans love that they aren’t handled by slick PR machines or marketing operatives. There’s realness and intimacy.


It used to be that YouTubers put out content hoping to get discovered by the networks & studios. Now, that could be the worst thing that could happen to them as it risks damaging the profitable relationships they’ve built with fans. The top earner, a Swedish gamer known as PewDiePie, has 23.9 million subscribers and 3.69 billion total views, earning him up to an estimated $8.47 million per year after Google’s 45% cut. Who needs Hollywood?


So what should we as brands tasked with using content to build audiences and relationships take from this seismic shift in entertainment sources?


1. Your brand is legendary? So what? Nobody owes you a thing. The Variety article points out it’s not that teens don’t know the big TV, movie and music stars, it’s that they fail to appeal to them like YouTube stars do. You’re building your audience from scratch, and on even footing. Act like it.


2. You’ve got to be a consistent, reliable presence. If your brand doesn’t have a “show,” you’re in trouble. Your one-off attempt at a viral video or your twice a year Prezi about your white papers is a neglectful, non-serious effort that will be rewarded as such.


3. You must be real. This runs counter to everything corporate communications was built to be. “Who can be the best fraud” is no longer the game. Nobody really believed you were perfect and flawless anyway.


4. You must be approachable/accessible. Again, corporate customer service and interaction has been historically constructed for one purpose, to avoid actual contact with customers. You can’t build intimacy and hide at the same time.


5. Communities get built around great content. Following a YouTube star alone isn’t nearly as much fun as having a tribe to discuss the star and their content with. If the content strikes a chord, fan bases coalesce and spread quickly. Think less about creating fans of your brand, and more (much, much more) about creating fans of your content.


Modern marketing and the technology to optimize social distribution & promotion are falling into place. But those capabilities will go completely wasted if brands can’t stop self-obsessing long enough to care about what kind of content will make them a star with their customers.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freeimages.com

Friday Aug 08, 2014

Is Google Plus Toast?

Google Plus is just 3 years old, far to young to have already entered that “awkward” stage. But just like a maturing adolescent, Google Plus seems to be trying to find itself, to figure out what it is, and to find the crowd it wants to run with.


Recent events have broadcast strong signals that its dream of being a major social network has begun hitting the wall of reality. Kind of like that moment it dawned on you the band you formed with your slacker friends that practiced in your basement was NOT going to be the next Beatles.


When that moment arrives, the next logical step is to figure out what plan B is going to be. Plan A was to make G+ a foundation from which identities (real, not anonymous) would be established, and that would be used to log into all Google’s products and services. Thoughts of being a full-on competitor to the likes of Facebook reportedly faded coinciding with the departure of the farther of Google Plus, Vic Gundotra.


Technically, Plan A was a success. The single login was created and G+ was integrated into YouTube and Gmail. If you wanted to use Hangouts, Photos, Talk, gChat, Auto Backup, you were going to be a G+ user. In fact, if you used Google products for personal and work, you were probably going to have several G+ accounts. Many blanched at the imposition of it, but Google Plus user numbers soared.


Now recent developments:


All things that make you go hmm, as is the fact some users got a survey from Google asking what they’d think if G+ didn’t exist anymore. Data says it wouldn’t exactly rock monthly schedules. Nielsen saw in November US site users spent an average 6 hours, 15 minutes there, compared to G+’s visitors spending an average 7 minutes on that site. Smartphone usage paints a similar story.


And yet…you’ll find plenty of Google Plus defenders. Forrester’s Nate Elliott points out 22% of US online adults told them they visited G+ monthly, the same as Twitter and beating out LinkedIn, Pinterest, & Instagram. Of even more interest to marketers, they saw that on average, top brands gathered 90% more fans on G+ than on Twitter. Like engagement? Looking at interactions with over 2,500 brand posts across 7 social networks, Forrester saw G+ generate almost as much per follower engagement as Facebook, and almost twice Twitter’s engagement.


But arguments that Google Plus is an effective social network don’t mean much if Google itself does not intend for G+ to be a social network. Analysts like Scott Strawn of International Data believe it will instead be a means of linking Google products, this time more for business customers & purposes vs. for connecting and sharing by the masses, with the Google Plus brand moving steadily into the background.


So even if you want to say that Google Plus as a social network is “toast,” that doesn’t mean it can’t then be effectively reimagined for different purposes, like say croutons.



@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freeimages.com

Tuesday Aug 05, 2014

Benefits and Risks of Social Media for Financial Communications

Today (Aug 5), we’ll be doing one of those highly informative, timely webcasts we’re in the habit of doing.  This one is on the SEC’s disclosure guidelines for you brave souls trying to do social for financial services companies. We’re trying to keep you out of trouble. So let’s turn the blog over to one of the presenters, Serena Ehrlich, Director of Social and Evolving Media at Business Wire.


social media for financial servicesIn April 2013, the SEC announced that with proper promotion, public companies could utilize social networks to meet material news disclosure. This decision was met with cheers and jeers. For some, this was proof that news distribution and consumption had changed, and moved online to a wider, more transparent audience. For others, this opened a can of worms, as IROs scrambled to determine if this type of communications matched their audience base.


In truth, there are pros and cons to this decision. For many, the cons of using social media as a sole disclosure network outweigh the pros. For these IROs, instead of utilizing these platforms for disclosure, many IROs have found great success leveraging social networks as both a listening tool and a way to enhance traditional disclosure methods.


Social Media as a Disclosure Tool – The Good:


Social Media Is A Discussion Platform – And People Are Talking About You!

Search Twitter for your ticker symbol, cash tag ($ + ticker symbol), company name, or senior leadership and you will see a wide range of conversations occurring about your business. Look deeper and you start to see themes highlighting the good, and bad, truth and lies, about your company. This free focus group allows you to see what is being said and adjust your program accordingly.


Social Media Can Be Planned

While many conversations in social media are generated somewhat spontaneously, once you know the general conversations that do take place, you can craft some pre-approved response messaging, or even decision trees, to help you manage your involvement. Decision trees highlight the steps to take based on each type of potential conversation – from a misunderstanding, to a crisis. Being organized helps you respond faster.


Social Media Increases the Reach of Your News

Share your news across social channels and watch interested parties pick it up and reshare it with their own audiences, a perfect addition to traditional news coverage. Include a photo or video with your social media update, and increase social shares of your news by up to 100%! In addition, utilize blogs to provide additional information surrounding larger events to provide journalists easy ways to round out their stories.


In addition, many IROs are utilizing Twitter as a means to live tweet their earnings or large announcements. This is a terrific use of the service and very easy to implement. This allows interested parties to receive updates in real-time, just as if they had dialed into your earnings call.


Social Media as a Disclosure Tool – Be Wary:


Social Channels Are Not Real Time News Distribution Services

One of the biggest downsides to social media platforms as disclosure vehicles is that social platforms do not provide real time news distribution. Since the revenue of social platforms is mostly dependent on advertising, social networks do alter feeds based on user preferences.


Lack of Access to Social Networks

Even in 2014, many financial institutions do not allow employees to access social channels from their work computers.


140 Character Limit

In many cases, the downside to social only disclosure is the character limits for news updates. Can you tell the entire story you need to share in only 140 characters?


Less Media Coverage

Unfortunately, for many companies utilizing social media for disclosure, this distribution method has impacted their overall news coverage. If your goal for financial news is coverage within key publications, limiting media relations to social only, social media news distribution is not for you.


Social media platforms are incredibly powerful communication tools. Used properly, they will increase the relationship between an organization and their key constituents as well as provide insights into company perception, company message alignment and provide an early head’s up to potentially negative news. To learn more about the 12 reasons why companies should or should not utilize social media for financial disclosure, download our guide now.


And, of course, try to make today’s webinar. If you can’t, it will be recorded for your listening pleasure.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freeimages.com

Friday Aug 01, 2014

Social Commerce: Shopping Inside of Social

social commerceWe know the value of friends recommending products to friends, but are we seeing these motivated transactions conducted immediately on the social platforms themselves?  Is social commerce still a thing?


What really seems to matter most is whether or not brand participation on social channels is generating incoming traffic to wherever transactions happen to be transacted. In fact, the very definition of sCommerce has quietly morphed over the years from sales conducted on Facebook, to sales resulting from social.


On-Facebook stores are still available, of course. Brands like J.C. Penney, GNC, Levi’s and 1-800-Flowers have done it or are doing it. But the real drive, budget-wise, is to use social to generate traffic and leads as opposed to building social stores. Social budgets are also moving to rounding up leads and sales as opposed to branding. The expectations for pre-sold shoppers to come from social to the brand’s transaction location and make the purchase are high.


And yet…despite a Shopify survey that found Facebook driving almost two-thirds of social visits to Shopify stores and claiming a 129% year over year increase of orders from social, and despite the barely known Polyvore driving the top average order value of $66.75, less than 2% of traffic to retailers’ sites comes from social. And almost half of retailers said less than 1% of social shoppers wound up buying anything. The best social conversion rate is Facebook’s 1.85%.


So what’s broken?


Every hoop a buyer has to jump through is a golden opportunity for that buyer to reconsider, change their mind, or put off the purchase. The shortest, most frictionless path from discovery to reassurance to sale should be every brand’s Apollo mission. And since two of those three things are happening primarily on social, sales inside of social, that original definition of sCommerce, might be worth a solid second look.


The social nets are inching forward. Pinterest, the proclaimed king of purchase intent, has rich pins so prices and inventory can be updated real-time. You can reply to tweets with Amazon product links adding #AmazonCart and throw the item into your shopping cart. You can make AMEX purchases by adding a hashtag. But these things amount to better social catalog experiences or buy link usage, not purchase-inside-social opportunities.


Pictures leaked from Fancy in January gave us a peek at Twitter Commerce. Brand tweets can be expanded to show a Buy button, from which you could purchase the item inside the Twitter app. Now we’re talking. OpenSky is trying to get there as well.


The goal is to capitalize on everything social brings in terms of shopping and exposure to products tied to users’ visible interests, capitalize on the trusted recommendations of social connections, use content as your virtual end-aisle displays, use the ongoing social relationships you have with customers and rich social data to keep bumping them toward a purchase, customize their experiences, and find the quickest way to satisfy the buying impulse when it strikes.


Finding something you want to buy in a store and then being told by the clerk you have to go two buildings down to buy it sounds silly. Digital hoops are equally silly.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freeimages.com


About

Get the latest changes and innovations to social technology platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube, and learn where social marketing trends are headed.

Connect With Us

Search

Categories
Archives
« August 2014 »
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
     
2
3
4
6
7
9
10
11
13
14
16
17
18
20
21
23
24
25
27
28
30
31
      
Today