Tuesday Apr 29, 2014

The Art & Science of Social Marketing

An abbreviated version of this post first appeared at Forbes.com


social marketing artAs we near a very exciting event in NYC April 30, in which CMO’s will bear witness for the first time to the “big picture” of cloud and data-driven modern marketing execution, how about a quick look at the social media component of that modern marketing?


Marketing used to be largely art. But today’s CMO must also know and be adept at the science driving customer insight, relevant and timely targeting, and precision measurement.


The Science

  • Understanding the tech of each social network, those that are here and those yet to come. What are their functions? What value prop do they offer marketing? Just keeping up with the changes the current nets are always making can be rough.
  • Integrating those networks into one, manageable platform for efficient publishing and facilitating a comprehensive picture of your social analytics.
  • With organic reach dropping and the importance of paid social rising, is there tech that connects you to your choice of paid social media partners so you can quickly leverage top performing content to extend its reach and engagement?
  • Listening to the customer has become every bit as important as pushing marketing messages. Your social listening tool should alert you to the current hot topic in your space, what the public is saying about you, where the competition is messing up so you can offer better solutions, how people are responding to your campaigns, and the overall sentiment for your brand.
  • If customers are engaging on your social channels, you must honor that by responding quickly and relevantly. An engagement tool surfaces these communications and facilitates such responses. Nobody likes being ignored.
  • An extensive, enterprise-capable workflow system means tasks can be assigned, managed, and customer communications can be routed to the right person for the fastest response and resolution. This workflow also allows for internal admin so, global to local, access to and activities on your channels are closely managed.
  • All these tools lead to the ultimate…the social-enabled enterprise, in which social weaves not only through marketing functions, but connects to other enterprise systems such as CRM, Sales, HR, Fulfillment, etc. for the most powerful use of big data imaginable.


The Art

  • Tech is far from the answer to every marketing challenge. Creativity is not only still vital, it is even more do-or-die as content quality separates winners from losers. Bad idea attempting to commoditize creative talent.
  • Brands now have to be “Liked.” So, you can’t realistically proceed sans brand voice and personality. People don’t connect with entities, they connect with humans. As in real life, there’s an intuitive art to striking a chord with people and making them want to associate with you.
  • Brands need entertainers and journalists. For the content you put out there to stand a chance, it must entertain or inform. Entertainers and storytellers are artists.
  • You’ll hear how effective it is to “surprise and delight” customers. Yes, tech can show what your audience tends to like, but creating something that truly catches them off guard and sweeps them off their feet is an art. (See? You didn’t realize you were performing art when you came up with that amazing surprise for your anniversary)


Social is but one part of the modern marketing ecosystem. But perhaps more than any other component, as a result of being in the trenches of day-to-day brand/customer relationship building and nurturing, social is where you’re likely to find the most even mix of art and science.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

Friday Apr 25, 2014

13 Social Marketing Facts + Your Possible Reactions

social media statisticsMore people own a mobile device than a toothbrush.

“So I guess we should get around to mobile-optimizing our site, right?”


90% of consumers trust peer recommendations. 14% trust ads.

“Then why isn’t our daily mission to turn our customers into raving fans?”


The average person has an attention span of 7 seconds, that’s one second less than a goldfish.

“But…I just finished a 280-page white paper!”


45% of CMOs are confident they know which metrics or business outcomes key stakeholders care about.

“Wow, I haven’t even asked what my stakeholders care about. I should probably hop right on that.”


B2B buyers are 70%-90% of the way through the buying journey before they reach out to a vendor.

“That’s a shame, cause I’m awesome on the phone. I sure hope the assets we have out there that precede us are good enough.”


Social media marketing budgets are projected to double in the next 5 years.

“Great! Time to calculate what’s double the cost of one low-paid intern.”


Adding social sharing buttons to email messages increases click-through rates over 150%.

“Wait, what? You can put social sharing buttons on emails?!”


60% of consumers feel more positive about a brand after consuming content from it.

“Hey, we post a blog every 3 or 4 months. We’re solid.”


56% of Millennials won’t work for firms prohibiting the use of social in the office.

“Banning social; kind of a hard way to get that employee brand advocacy program going.”


Job postings on LinkedIn for social media positions have grown 1,300% since 2010.

“Apparently my stock is going way up, and the brand I work for is doing an outstanding job of pretending it isn’t.”


78% of small businesses get at least a quarter of their new customers via social.

“But I keep hearing there’s no ROI to social. I guess new customers don’t translate to ROI.”


1 million links are shared every 20 minutes on Facebook.

“That’s a lot of competition. I have a bad feeling some of the lame stuff we put out doesn’t make the cut.”


In 10 years, 40% of the Fortune 500 won’t be here anymore.

“Wow, I hope we’re as nimble and innovative as we like to think.”



@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freeimages.com

Tuesday Apr 22, 2014

I Won’t Be Ignored: Why We Want Customer Service on Social

bad social customer serviceAdmit it.  Sometimes in the dark of night, when you’re alone and no one is looking, you gripe about how annoying those people who expect customer service on social are. They get in the way of how corporations wanted to do customer service: “Your call is very important to us, please continue to hold.”


Prior to the expectations social customer service brought, it seemed like the goal of most customer service was to actually break down the customer and frustrate them out of wanting help at all, supported by a brand attitude of, “Wow, you sure seem mad. But what are you gonna do about it?”


Along came social, and suddenly they actually could do something about it. We want customer service on social because:


It’s faster…or at least it should be.

53% reaching out to a brand for service on Twitter expect a response within an hour. 32% expect a response within half an hour. And 57% expect the same response time on nights & weekends as during business hours. Sitting on hold for 30 minutes on the phone is regarded as an abuse that older folk had to endure, but that’s no longer tolerable. In fact, J.D. Power tells us 18 to 29-years-olds are more likely to use your social for customer service (43%) than for marketing stuff (23%).


It connects us to a human.

We’re a generation that’s fine with automation and letting robots help us…to a point. What the bots lack is the ability to project caring or a personal investment in the resolution of our problem. It’s hard to have a relationship with automation, but when a community manager saves the day, the customer feels like they have a hero inside the brand. That’s relationship building.


It acknowledges my problem is not like “all the others.”

FAQs and reams of self-help pages project that you, the customer, are nothing special and neither is your problem. It’s a problem someone else has had, and there’s an answer. All you have to do is shut down your work and devote as much time as necessary to finding it. If you find it, hopefully the generalized solution will actually apply to your specific situation. If not, it’s off to the user forums, where the advice you get might take days, and may or may not come from someone who actually knows what they’re talking about. The extent to which brands try to keep from interacting with you makes quite an impression.


It more aggressively seeks to resolve my problem.

55% of customers get frustrated if they have to repeat the same info several times to several different people. 65% get frustrated if they have to contact the brand twice for the same issue. Managers of brand social channels know they have no such luxury to put a customer on ice or pass them around like a hot potato. The public is watching the interaction, so there must be a timely, happy ending to each customer service story. Integration into CRM systems helps make that happen.


It empowers and sets us up to publicize mistreatment.

American Express says the average number of people a social customer will tell about a good customer experience is 42. The average number of people they’ll tell about a bad experience is 53. Increasingly, customers feel it’s nothing short of their duty to warn people about you. 58% are more likely to share their customer services experiences now than 5 years ago.


It empowers and sets us up to publicly express pride in the brands we like.

Likewise, your customers want to be happy and proud to be associated with you. In addition to the advocacy and the help marketing your company, when you execute good service on social, those delighted customers spend 20% to 40% more with you. Take that to the next social ROI conversation with your boss.


So splash that customer service email or phone number everywhere you want. Force people into fix-it-yourself trees or open forums. People are still going to go on your social channels seeking customer service. Questions on Facebook Pages alone are up 85% over last year. And if the experiences don’t match up to modern expectations, you’re largely in the disappointment business.


BONUS EYE-OPENING STATISTIC:

70% of Marketing departments are involved in social, compared to a mere 19% of Customer Service departments – Ragan


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: Belovodchenko Anton, freeimages.com




Friday Apr 18, 2014

When Bad Tweets Attack: 8 Bits of Advice

Bad Twitter attackIt’s the nightmare every C-suite exec envisioned back when talk of doing social media first started…what happens if the brand makes a catastrophic and very public social media mistake? Don’t people realize how much money has been spent on marketing and PR to make sure every syllable the brand puts out is soft, safe and sanitized?


Social is 24/7, real-time, revealing, and involves interaction between humans. That is not a recipe corporations seek out. But it’s the one they’re now forced to deal with. And just as they feared, mistakes are going to be made.


Case in point, this week’s disastrous tweet on the US Airways account containing a photo I really can’t describe without getting into trouble myself. To its credit, the airline is not firing the social manager who made the mistake. Skift.com found US Airways sends over 400 reply tweets a day, with an average response time of 38 minutes. Despite the horror of the mistake, that’s a solid record. An organization dispensing with the “off with their heads” mentality when it’s not warranted is quite mature and refreshing.


They are hardly alone in taking a social media stumble. Sometimes it’s innocent error. Sometimes it’s being greatly disconnected from how the public feels about you and what they’re likely to do, such as a financial firm’s cancelled Q&A after followers seized the solicitation for questions as a chance to mock the brand and industry mercilessly.


All too often, it’s a lack of judgment or a lack of awareness to make good judgment calls. Far too many brands have piggybacked on trending current events for marketing purposes, only to meet with blowback from followers for being exploitative. Light events like the Super Bowl, fine. Tragedies & anniversaries of tragedies, not fine.


Sometimes, it’s rogue employees such as the live-tweeting of a mass firing at HMV on the brand account, made worse by the marketing director then publicly asking followers, “How do I shut down Twitter?”


And sometimes, bad things even happen from what you don’t do. British Airways lost Hasan Syed's luggage and didn’t respond to his Twitter inquiry, so he simply bought a promoted tweet and amplified what happened, which was his right. British Airways later admitted its Twitter feed was only open during the day.


So here are a few things to keep in mind about when bad tweets happen:

  • As some of the above examples illustrate, you’re often your own worst enemy. Learn to do social right.
  • Have a social media policy so you’ll minimize risk and instantly know what to do if something goes wrong.
  • Get the best social listening tools you can find so you’ll know what’s being said about you.
  • Understand that if you make a mistake, it’s going to go viral, especially if it’s funny. You better find a sense of humor about your corporate self if you don’t have one.
  • Know that social is a human endeavor…if it’s done right. Mistakes are going to happen. Don’t over-react.
  • Don’t hire your social managers carelessly. They have to be smart, aware of the world around them, in tune with their audience, able to stay calm in a crisis, and have solid judgment.
  • If a bad tweet happens, do NOT try to be slick. Own up to it, explain it, apologize if necessary.
  • Know that a bad tweet usually isn’t as big a deal to readers as it is to you. They’ll express snarky outrage if it’s in bad taste. They’ll have fun with it at your expense. But they’re generally understanding and forgiving. Remember, they do social themselves. They know it’s a high wire act.


@mikestiles @oraclesocial
Photo: freeimages.com

Tuesday Apr 15, 2014

5 Things That Should Be Keeping CMO’s Up at Night

CMO insomniaHey, don’t go assuming that being kept up all night is always a bad thing. When you think about what’s swirling around in a CMO’s head, it might be worry that keeps them tossing and turning, or it could be excitement about the cool changes we’re seeing.


To be on safe side though, let’s just assume it has to do with confusion.


And that’s understandable, because marketing has been turned on its head in a very short period of time. Here are 5 things the CMO-on-their-toes should be asking themselves. If they don’t know enough to even be asking the questions, well, there are bigger problems.


1. Seriously, Am I Going to Be in Charge of EVERYTHING Now?


The demands on today’s CMO have gone far beyond branding, PR and advertising. Since the disruption to business had its epicenter in Marketing, the CEO is looking to the CMO to “deal” with every ripple effect resulting from it, no matter how far out into the organization it reaches.


Suddenly, it’s not about getting leads for sales, it’s about conversions. Suddenly, the CMO must understand the tech that drives marketing execution or harvests the metrics by which they’ll be judged. Suddenly, with social a big part of recruiting, the CMO has a big hand in HR. Suddenly, with customer service via social, the CMO is invested in that customer interaction. Suddenly, the CMO is culling feedback that informs product development.


Today’s CMO might notice the c-suite doesn’t require as many offices as it used to.


2. What Do My Customers and Prospects Want From Us?


Nothing good will come from a CMO that lies awake at night thinking about the next campaign or corporate message. If you’re going to lose sleep, lose it thinking about how to find out exactly what your customers do and don’t want from you. It’s called customer-centricity. Lots of companies talk about it, but frighteningly few actually do it. If you care, and if you listen, you’ll be more than halfway to sleeping through the night.


3. How Am I Going to Cope with Being a Media Company?


No matter the platform, marketing is increasingly content marketing. With an all-out war on to capture attention from a mobile, over busy, short-attention-span public, only content that entertains, informs, or provides tangible value will score.


You’re probably not an entertainment or journalism brand. That doesn’t matter anymore. You have to be. Imagery and video are huge in terms of engagement. Your blog has to rock. 24% of digital marketers even plan to add podcasting this year to capitalize on the intimacy of in-car listening and car connectivity. The days of not resourcing content, not hiring people who know how to consistently make it, or trying to commoditize it, are OVER.


4. What Tech Am I Supposed to Invest In?


Many brands are trying to operate with disconnected, standalone solutions. That’s an untenable position as Marketing continues its expansion and social extends to nearly every function of the enterprise. Not having integrated components means you’ll be leaving big data advantages on the table. The right hand won’t know what the left hand is doing, and the feet will be completely clueless.


It’s unlikely most brands are ready to jump in to the largest social and marketing ecosystem for the enterprise available. Therefore, a technology partner that gets you the components you need today, but that also sets you up for the addition and quick integration of components like CRM, will help you rest easier.


5. What If I Pursue a Strategy and Then Everything Changes?


Good news: you don’t have to wonder about that, because you can already be 100% assured everything is going to change…probably often and quickly. Looking for a point at which you can say, “Okay, we’ve totally got this down,” or at which you can go on autopilot, will only lead to anxiety.


The social networks themselves will always change, the ad products they offer will come and go, mobile technology will change, abilities to measure will change, trends & tastes will change, and consumer behavior will change – as will their expectations. The fact that change is inevitable makes waiting for things to “settle down” before you act a dangerous endeavor.


Asking yourself the questions is the first step toward resolving these pressing issues in your mind, which is your key to sleeping like a baby.


@mikestiles
Photo: freedigitalphotos.net


Friday Apr 11, 2014

Twitter Advertising: 15 New Ways to Bet on Your Content

Reality check: like Facebook, Twitter has to make money.  And in the absence of charging users a subscription fee to use it, that money has to come from Twitter advertising.


The profitless Twitter makes most of its revenue from advertising, $219.6 million in Q4, which doubles the previous year’s numbers. So it occurred to them that if they offered you marketers more advertising products and options, that number would only go higher.


Enter 15, count ‘em, 15 new ad plays that will be coming your way from Twitter over the next 6 months. And from the reports so far, if your goals are downloads, subscriptions, or purchases, these products will speak more to your needs than existing offerings.


Expect most of these products to be fueled by the Twitter Card technology, which allows functionality to be programmed into tweets. This allows for a world of one-click calls-to-action not possible in regular tweets, which, given the speed and immediacy with which people use the platform, is almost a must to capture desired engagement. Users can download an app, get someone on the phone, make a purchase, sign up for a contest, etc.


But the big question: will Twitter users think these are cool opportunities? Or will they see them as highly intrusive, annoying ads? That depends a great deal on what you do.


Twitter hasn’t really upped the ad content since their first product in 2010, and that’s because they’ve been pretty diligent about the user experience. So far their ad products have not done damage, but these new 15 do represent risk. As it is, a Deutsche Bank Securities report showed 85% of users said the ads they get aren’t relevant.


So Twitter and you marketers are about to jump into the unknown together. These ads must be targeted and relevant. They must be served up at just the right rate. And they must be of quality; meaning what it always means for content - it entertains, it informs, or it offers something of real value. Put out flops and you inflict damage to both Twitter and your brand.


In short, when it comes to Twitter advertising you’re about to pay to get your content in front of more user eyeballs, and in so doing you’re placing a bet that said content is going to be appreciated and welcomed, not a user experience downer.


@mikestiles
Photo: stock.xchng

Tuesday Apr 08, 2014

Is Social Marketing Over?

“Is social marketing over”?! It’s a question that might come as a bit of a shock seeing as how many brands are still in the “just getting started” phase of it.


So to get an answer to our question, and to lessen the shock, we should probably determine just what “social marketing” means. The method of marketing to people by building relationships with them and winning their trust is hardly anything new. Door-to-door vacuum cleaner salesmen figured that out long ago.


So social is not a marketing method. It’s a medium, a type of media. Look…it’s even right there in the name, social media. It’s a utility, a stage, a delivery and measurement system. It's a way for brands to utilize new technologies to get messaging to customers and prospects, and to help those people receive it in a way that lines up with how they’ve adopted technology into their personal, day-to-day lives.


So if you aren’t social marketing on the medium of social, what are you doing? You’re content marketing and influencer marketing. You’re not “putting out a social.” You’re putting out content and using the medium of social to do it. Certainly it’s unlike any other medium we’ve had access to before. It’s empowered the consumer, upped the mandate of real-time, raised the value of providing real value, and demanded two-way interaction.


Because of that, the medium has also come to be used for functions that formerly were not, but that are increasingly coming under, marketing’s domain; eCommerce, Customer Service, A/B Testing & Research, Recruiting, even Sales & Fulfillment.


This, my friends, is the social-enabled enterprise. In it, CMO’s have more responsibilities and accountability than ever, and it’s the utility of social coursing through the organization like electricity, touching and integrating its multiple components, that has created this new business reorganization.


So the perception that you’re doing “social marketing” when you post on Facebook is technically true. But that’s like saying you’re doing print marketing when you publish a book. In both examples, what you’re actually doing is content marketing. You’re just employing two different types of media to do it.


Now, how does this mental delineation help you?


One, it should underline the degree of importance you should be putting on content creation. Two, it should shorten the debate over whether to “do” social. Marketers today are still driving social with the parking brake on, shocked that such an approach isn’t resulting in immediate, astonishing rewards. Are you prepared to attempt content, influence and event marketing while either eliminating or keeping a stranglehold on the entire medium of social? It’s akin to a CEO saying, “we’re serious about growing this business, but by golly we’re going to do it without phones.”


If you’re approaching social as a method and not embracing it for the medium that it is, then broadcast, print, and outdoor will no doubt still welcome you with open arms. Who knows, there might even be a nostalgic, anti-modern marketing charm to it.


@mikestiles
Photo: Mateusz Stachowski, stock.xchng

Friday Apr 04, 2014

You Didn’t Miss These Changes at LinkedIn Did You?

LinkedIn changesYes, LinkedIn is a very different social network with very different users and a very different purpose than the likes of Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. But, that doesn’t mean it’s not a platform that’s always experimenting, evolving and changing like the others.


In the past few months alone, LinkedIn has made alterations that you, especially if you’re B2B, must be aware of in case they affect current strategy or serve as inspiration for new LinkedIn tactics for your brand.


Congratulations! You’re a Publisher!


Did you ever see a post from one of those LinkedIn Influencers and think to yourself, “Hey, that should be me”? Now it can be. If you can’t publish already, you can apply to do it sooner rather than later. Then you can get people to follow you who aren’t in your network and start building an audience for your content.


But just to give you an idea of how impressed people need to be with your content, the average Influencer post gets over 31,000 views, over 250 likes and around 80 comments. We guess that’s why they’re called Influencers, and we’re proud to count Oracle President Mark Hurd among them.


Hmm, That Didn’t Work, Part 1


In what LinkedIn described as a decision to focus on a few big bets, they shut down LinkedIn Intro. It had only been around less than 4 months, so the decision to stop focusing on it came pretty quickly.


Intro infused LinkedIn contact data into your iPhone email inbox. LinkedIn still likes that idea and will pursue it via partnerships, but to do what it did meant LinkedIn had to scan every email that came into your inbox, which raised security concerns and frankly, successfully scared many people off. Adding to the headache, those that did install Intro had to be sure to uninstall it or their email wouldn’t work properly after the shutdown.


Hmm, That Didn’t Work, Part 2


LinkedIn is shutting down Slidecast (which didn’t make the “we want to focus on this” cut either). That let LinkedIn-owned SlideShare users put up presentations complete with audio. That stops April 30.


I Don’t Have to Deal With You Anymore


LinkedIn provided something users had been asking for in large numbers, a way to block members. It’s called…are you ready for this…”Member Blocking.” But before going nuclear on someone and blocking them, LinkedIn encourages you to try other settings such as disconnect, change your profile visibility, use anonymous profile viewing, and be mindful of what activities you broadcast.


Hmm, That Didn’t Work, Part 3


Sell Hack thought its "Hack In" tool did a pretty cool thing. It let you go to any profile on LinkedIn and with the click of a button, get the email address of that person from LinkedIn’s database. Boy did LinkedIn not like that. After a cease and desist, the tool was removed, though Sell Hack said they’ll be back with something else that fits more in line with LinkedIn’s terms of service.


The Best Way to Get to People


The new “How You’re Connected” tool is right there on profile pages, and shows you not just who in your network knows them (which is pretty helpful in and of itself), but how they know each other. This way you can choose the person to make the introduction that makes the most sense given what you’re trying to accomplish.


How’s Your Content Doing?


Do you want an analytics resource that gives you insight into the impact of your paid and organic content on LinkedIn? Awesome, because that’s exactly how LinkedIn defines their Content Marketing Score. Take your unique engagement on LinkedIn, divide it by your total target audience and there you have it, along with tips on how to get your score up. It’s partner, Trending Content, shows you what stories are resonating best in a range of subject areas.


So Long Products & Services


Products & Services on Company Pages will be gone by April 14th. Who needs it when you now have “Showcase Pages,” which let people follow individual products without following the whole brand? That means more relevant content and communities. Updates still show up on the Company Page though, and show up there in search results.


LinkedIn is doing just fine, 277 million users and adding 2 per second. 40% of users check in daily. There are 3 million business pages and 2.1 million groups, with 8,000 more created weekly. With all that going on, be ready to stay on top of what the inevitable growth spurts might mean for you.


@mikestiles
Photo: stock.xchng

Tuesday Apr 01, 2014

Your Brand Personality: You Should Probably Get One

Do you bore people out of their skull at parties?  Do people avoid you because they can never quite figure you out? Then you may not want to volunteer to be put in charge of your brand’s personality or voice.


We’ve all seen them, those charismatic people who can walk into a room and light it right up. People gravitate toward them, want to spend time with them, be associated with them. It’s like they’ve never met a stranger. That’s what you want your brand to be.


Imagine being at a barbecue and someone arrives looking out of place in a buttoned-up suit. They speak and respond to questions in carefully rehearsed lines. They only talk about their agenda. They offer no emotion or opinion. And oh yeah…they have their lawyers with them to carefully vet conversations. Wheee!


It’s very difficult to live life at its fullest with no personality. Yet for decades, corporations have actively fostered the “corporate veil,” which cast them as faceless, inhuman entities with walls that protect them from customers. Relationships? Are you kidding?


Now, post-social revolution, brand personalities are vital. Without one, no one can get to know you, connect with you, like you, root for you, vouch for you…everything we want them to do. Plus, social abhors a vacuum. If you don’t establish a brand personality, the public will project one onto you. And they may cast you as the villain, or the loser.


How do you get a brand personality and internalize it? You make a huge, jargon-filled whitepaper. Just kidding.

  • Consider your mission and values
  • Decide what you want people to think of when they think of you
  • Think about what kind of people your targets are and what they like
  • Decide what kind of experience you want people to have with you
  • Settle on a tone


As for internalizing, “The Big Bang Theory” has multiple writers. But they can all write for the character of Sheldon because that character has been so clearly defined. They can hear the voice of Sheldon in their heads as they write. Beyond that, there are head writers, directors and the actor himself. If a line or action is inconsistent with the character, they’ll catch it.


Lay out a clear description for employees and representatives of your brand as to what the personality and experience should be. Make this personality the dominant vibe in the workplace (Brands get this wrong. Personality isn’t just for external consumption). Make the personality evident in all assets and communications. The more you live it, the more instinctive it becomes. And don’t half do it. You have to really put your personality out there, just like a person has to.


Some final thoughts on brand personality:

  • Inconsistent or erratic personalities confuse (and scare) people. Commit to the character.
  • Personalities are hard to break up with. Mysterious inhuman organizations aren’t.
  • Studies show brands that display human characteristics connect better because we’re more receptive to messages from those we have an emotional connection with.


Would anyone become an enthused “fan” of Katy Perry if she were a dull, unimaginative wallflower? Even if they liked the songs, without Katy’s personality (present and evident in everything she does), it’s unlikely her brand would be what it is today. What could the power of personality do for your brand?


@mikestiles
Photo: stock.xchng


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