Tuesday Apr 30, 2013

Social Network Updates: While You Were Busy Marketing

many phonesYou’re a busy, powerful social marketer, so you may not have time to track every little change the social networks make. And they make a lot of them. Since these trends can inspire and inform strategy for brands, let’s look at some recent developments with 4 of the big ones.

Facebook

Facebook’s moves continue to underscore their growing self-image as a mobile company.

  • Facebook Home, an Android overlay that lives across the operating system, piqued enough curiosity that it got well over 500,000 downloads on Google Play right out of the gate. It’s preloaded in many phones. But do users like it? The average rating has been around 2.2 stars out of 5.
  • Facebook made your brand pages look different on mobile.  Some say it’s about the “Yelpification” of Facebook. It’s easier for your customers to see your hours, get a map, check prices, check ratings, contact you and like or recommend you. It’s more visual and pinned posts are prominent, but…no tabs.
  • On the iOS app, users now see the same choices for viewing their News Feed as they have on desktop.  The dropdown lets them get Most Recent, All Friends, Following, Pages, and other sorting options. Some users have a list for the brand pages they follow. Let’s hope they check that one a lot.

Twitter

Twitter’s developments have mostly been about going beyond text-based messaging toward being a gateway for all online multimedia content.

  • Twitter Music launched, a way for music lovers to use Twitter to find and enjoy music and artists.  They’re open to more music sources, but right now streams come from iTunes, Rdio and Spotify. Basically, it uses Twitter activity to see what tunes you might like and plugs you in to music and artists your fave artists follow and tweet about.
  • There’s talk Twitter’s getting into local tweet discovery. If they execute this take on letting users see tweets from a certain radius around them, whether they follow the tweeters or not, that gets interesting for brands who want to tweet offers to nearby users.
  • Twitter made a deal with the sizable Starcom MediaVest Group that will give its clients access to special ad opportunities on and with Twitter. Those in the know look at this plus Twitter’s keyword targeting and see a commitment from the little blue bird to play ball with marketers so everybody’s nest gets feathered.

Google Plus

King of the “should we or shouldn’t we increase the amount of attention we pay to this” platforms. The value prop, G+’s integration with other Google products, continues.

  • If you open a Google Drive file, now you’ll see G+ profile shots of the others looking at it.  Mouse over the pic and you’ll get the person’s G+ card, cover image, and which circle you put them in. It’s all about making Google Plus a key integrated collaboration tool.
  • Most still use Facebook to log in to websites, but a Janrain report says Google Plus' share went from 31 to 34% quarter to quarter. Google’s also shutting down its acquired Meebo Bar in June. Google Plus tools will then serve as the user/website matchmaker.
  • But they also want Google Plus to be fun!  So now when you put a photo up on your G+ account, you see an emoticon option that (get this) analyzes the expressions on the faces in the photo and assigns each an emoticon that goes over their heads. Let me answer what may be your first question, yes you can turn it off.

LinkedIn

Linked in turns 10 in May and is enjoying nice growth; revenue and profit up 80% in 2012 and 200 million users. LinkedIn knows what it does and doesn’t want to be.

  • The new Linkedin Contacts pulls all your contacts from various sources into one place. You can make notes about each, get details of past interactions, be alerted to meetings and birthdays, and sort on the fly based on several criteria. Info automatically updates when changed on the sourced platform. Not included: Twitter & Facebook contacts. LinkedIn wants to be all business.
  • LinkedIn is also quite aware mobile is where it’s happening.  A revamped mobile app features big visual improvements and works hard to deliver users content informed by their profiles and habits.
  • Speaking of content, LinkedIn has made big moves toward being a key content provider for business.  They acquired newsreader Pulse to “be the definitive professional publishing platform.” That gets added to LinkedIn Today and the ability to subscribe to the content of Influencers.

You have now been quickly caught up on which way the social network development winds are blowing. Therefore, we expect you to be even more busy and powerful.

@mikestiles
Photo: stock.xchng

Friday Apr 26, 2013

4 Steps to Social Selling

No solicitorsSocial selling has all but done away with the image of poor Willy Loman, the guys of Glengarry Glenn Ross, or the door-to-door vacuum cleaner salesman who cleans everyone’s carpets for free then doesn’t get a sale. Those guys were cold callers who didn’t know their prospects. Didn’t even know they weren’t prospects at all.

But even the most veteran salespeople will tell you relationships are what usually get the deal closed. So it’s mighty convenient that social is all about connecting and fostering relationships. How senseless not to use social to do just that with customers and prospects, or not to use social to know as much about buyers as possible.

Ta-da! Marketing automation + social data + social listening & engagement is ready to rock your monthly billings. CSO Insights found “effective use of sales intelligence increases revenue productivity per sales rep by 17%.” Social is a fountain of sales intelligence, and there are 4 steps to positioning yourself for that kind of win.

1. Be a good, active social citizen
Would you buy sunglasses from a longtime personal contact on Facebook or someone that randomly pinged you solely for the purpose of selling you sunglasses? People buy from people they know.

  • Get to know prospects by being on the networks they favor.
  • Be part of the groups they’re in, sharing content of real and relevant value to that group.
  • Be consistent, perpetually growing your network so your own fans and rave reviewers will be there to legitimize you.
  • Make sure all your social profiles are accurate and transparent so prospects can research you.
  • Make sure your contact info is on all your profiles so prospects can reach you.
  • Don’t be constantly pitching your product to every eye that can see you.

2. Listen and learn
Do they teach in sales school that often, the fastest path to a deal is to just shut up and listen? If not, they should. Listening to your prospects’ conversations reveal issues you can step in and resolve. You won’t be a pest, you’ll be a hero.

  • Honest, it’s not stalking. Be aware of what your prospects are thinking and talking about.
  • Look for indications in their social posts that signal they may need your solution.
  • Use the keywords in your social listening platform (you do have one, right?) to get alerted whenever a prospect is experiencing a pain point.
  • Use that same platform to keep an eye on multiple social networks at once so you can seize all such opportunities in real time.
  • With social listening, insert yourself into the buyer’s current stream of thought as opposed to trying direct their stream of though to what you want.

3. Engage at the right time, in the right way
You’re not cold calling, which is a time burner anyway. According to InsideView, over 90% of CEO’s said they never respond to cold emails or calls. Instead, you’re approaching the buyer due to their publicly expressed problem.

  • Craft your social relationship so you’re not seen as a vendor, but as a trusted advisor. Invest the time to foster that image.
  • Connection rates through LinkedIn are 7 times greater than email. Their InMail yields an open rate often over 20%. Connect in ways they trust and are comfortable with.
  • Studies show it can take an average of 6.2 email/phone/voicemail exchanges and 9 business days to set up a meeting. Social tools can reduce the friction.
  • Engage buyers early in their search for a solution. They do a lot of research on social, so if you’re listening, you can be the first to solve their problem.
  • Connect prospects to others who’ve used your solution to positive effect. It’s greatly reassuring, and studies show social users trust peers with no vested interest much more than brands.
  • Make sure your solution is clear, that it’s about them and their immediate needs, and that you’re making them confident enough to take the desired action.

4. Use data to apply what you learn, enterprise-wide
There are few things sadder than really great customer insight, much of it gleaned from social, sitting unapplied to all of the customer touch points across the enterprise, including sales.

  • Absorb integrated data so consumer preferences and behavior can be predicted, and the effectiveness of sales approaches and channels can be adjusted.
  • Understand that social affords you real time info that’s squandered if real time responses aren’t a part of the strategy.
  • Marketing automation technology is driving the convergence of sales and marketing. Marketers must be sellers, meaning leads and sales get added to awareness on the marketer’s to-do list.
  • In “Successful Social Selling,” Matt Heinz reminds us the goal is to get qualified prospects, not followers. That calls for different metrics to gauge the success of social selling.
  • Integrated marketing/sales approaches help track how effective marketing campaigns are across varying media such as mail, email and social.
  • A holistic approach such as the Oracle/Eloqua combo that activates all data and generates deep-dive analytics will pull marketing closer to sales and every other department across the enterprise, so the insight can enable superior customer experiences across all channels.

Much has been written about the growing critical nature of the customer experience. Keeping in mind prospects approached via social are part of that customer experience imperative will encourage A-game social sellers to demand the tech tools to listen to and engage potential customers more effectively.

@mikestiles
Photo: stock.xchng

Tuesday Apr 23, 2013

Easy Ways to Look Really Uncool to Your Fans

sleazeHave you as a brand ever paused to think about what an honor it is for somebody, anybody, to Like your Facebook page or choose to follow your tweets?  Outside of business reasons, how many brands have you followed on social? It’s a big deal for John Q. Public to invite you into their circle of friends and ask to hear from you. What kind of social content are you rewarding them with?

Below are quick, easy ways to immediately make someone regret Liking you. You see, they only want to self-identify with cool companies, and the things below make you markedly uncool.

Posting too much
A bigger issue on Facebook, but even on Twitter, each post should be new, breaking news type info. If you hog feeds, you’ll be seen as “clutter.” People like to clear clutter. Plus there’s no way you’ve got that much A-grade material. I’m not just making this up, a Lab42 study found posting too frequently is the #1 reason users unlike a brand.

Using social as a one-way megaphone
You’re not listening, you’re not responding, in general you’re making your fans feel like they’re there for you and not the other way around. The above study cites bad customer experience as the #3 reason fans dump brands on social. As for not listening, you’re only hurting yourself. 86% of consumer feedback online is being missed by brands, and 70% of marketers collect no social data about their competition.

Desperate selling
Do you really think your fans don’t know you want them to buy your product? So chill out and don’t make every post a breathless pitch. A Vanson Bourne study found 48% don’t want marketing messages at all. Another study (MediaBrix) shows people find ads disguised as content annoying, and 85% said it changed their opinion of the brand negatively if it had an effect at all. Yet…the study also found a great many marketers think this kind of disrespectful fake-out is effective.

Proving you’re uncommitted and/or lazy
Inconsistent posting that swings from radio silence to spammy barrage, auto-DMing that ruins the human-to-human social advantage, connecting social networks so Twitter hashtags show up in your Facebook posts, meaningless posts (“tell us your plans for the weekend!”), using an inhuman corporate voice, all prove to fans that for your brand, social is a pesky afterthought. Considering social makes up just 10% of brands’ digital marketing spend, and annual digital marketing operating budgets were a whopping 2.5% of company revenue in 2012, lack of commitment probably starts at the top.

There are certainly other annoyances: going hashtag crazy, not targeting or mis-targeting offers (studies indicate a 66% increase in engagement with proper targeting), asking fans to jump through hoops for you with no reward for doing so, etc.

But there are two bits of really good news. One; social management platforms now exist that make posting, listening, targeting, responding, and analyzing easier and more of an integrated process than ever. Doing social the right way is more do-able. And two; the rewards of not chasing fans away are great.

The Vanson Bourne report shows 68% of social users researched a product or service recommended by a friend, and 15% of those bought based on the recommendation. Win your fans’ trust, and they’ll get you new customers without a frantic hard sell. And 82% of respondents to the Lab42 study said Facebook is a good platform for interacting with brands, with 50% finding the page more useful than the brand’s www.

So your fans are quite predisposed to keep following you. Only you can mess that up and become the uncool kid they don’t want to be seen around.

@mikestiles

Friday Apr 19, 2013

Slam Dunk: March Madness Shows Social Works for Brands

basketballAren’t you glad brands don’t have to compete in head-to-head, single elimination brackets?  That really separates the champs from the challengers.  But if you do want to be a social marketing champ, there are lessons to learn from March Madness, its sponsoring brands, and the presenting network. 

First, consider the value of piggybacking on or being a sponsor of events that are, in and of themselves, attention getting.  You want to be where the people are.  Facilitating such events usually allows you lock up the social around it as part of the package.

Lesson: Find, support, and partner with cool events.

Social heightens the event experience.  It gets buzz going prior to the event.  It increases the desire to be part of the event in some way.  It connects people to others who are equally interested in the event.  It makes the event “bigger.”  And yes, it ups the “cool” factor of associated brands.

Lesson: A social ecosphere with a life all its own can be created around events.  

March Madness sponsors activated campaigns across social to leverage all that excitement into product-related executions, and launched 2nd screen activations to be everywhere fans were. 

Coke Zero did an “It’s Not Your Fault” campaign, created content to reinforce it, launched a “Bracket Insurance” Facebook app where fans could win prizes, had a constant presence on the 2nd screen, and was attached to all social aspects of the NCAA mobile app. 

Capital One launched a #RallyCry hashtag campaign, did a campaign takeover on Facebook/Twitter/Google+, had their profile reflect tweet battle results with celebrity allegiances fueling the rivalry, and supported content like “Bracket Challenge” on both NCAA.com and the mobile app. 

AT&T integrated into NCAA.com through “courtside” branded pictures with social sharing for Facebook and Twitter, put an interactive graphic on Twitter with celebrity athlete content, and held a Google+ hangout with CBS Sports’ Clark Kellogg. 

Lesson: To capitalize on social around events, bring something unique and fun to the festivities.  Add to the party, don’t just bring ads to the party.

As for CBS Sports, Twitter handles were featured during pre, post and halftime shows, plus cut-in updates.  Fan tweets were featured on-air during the post show.  Hashtags were integrated into the game itself through score table banners and backboard placements.  And mobile, tablet, and desktop access were promoted on-air.  

They also maximized the 2nd screen experience with a Game Tweets sidebar including content options, Key Moment video capture of highlights shareable to Facebook or Twitter, Key Moment tweets and stats in the “Twitter Game Pulse” tracker, and Facebook and Get Glue check-ins to games watched in the player.

Lesson: There are a LOT of ways you can include social in whatever your brand is doing.  Brainstorm them all, then execute everything that’s within your capacity and resources.  

Does all this social get anybody anywhere?  Can it help an event?  Can it move any needles?  Does it add to brand awareness?

A post March Madness analysis reveals the following:

  • There were 181 million viewers across TV, online, and out-of-home. 
  • Live streaming broke records within the first 2 weekends, with 45 million video streams (up 158%) and 12.6 million hours of live-streaming video (up 201%).
  • Mobile viewing went from 43% to 68% from the 1st weekend to the 2nd.
  • There were 7.7 million social media comments during game telecasts. 
  • There were 1.5 billion online conversations about corporate partners during the tournament.
  • There were 70 million Facebook interactions.

Lesson: Help the event and it will help you.  Social makes a big deal bigger, and you can facilitate and bask in that glow.  

A study by MEC, Australian TV network Seven, and Neuro-Insight used neuroscience to quantify the impact of the 2nd screen on viewer awareness and engagement.  There are an average 4 social interactions during a program, a cumulative increase of 23% in program engagement, and the impact on viewers included a “heightened receptivity to details.”  That’s good, actionable news for brands socially attached to the programming. 

Lesson: Events and content fight half the battle for you.  They draw a crowd.  Your job is to use social to bring additional fun to that detail-receptive crowd, and get credit for it.

Super Bonus Free Lesson: Get ready, you as brands will be increasingly tasked with staging your own events, creating your own content and drawing your own crowds.  And it’s got to be about what your fans like, not what you like.

More Browsing and Sources:

@mikestiles

Tuesday Apr 16, 2013

The Value of Enterprise Specific “Social Data” - Social Data within Social Customer Relationship Management (Social CRM)

This is the first in a series of guest posts from Don Springer, VP Product Development for Oracle Social and Pat Ma, Principal Product Marketing Director for CX and CRM on the value of leveraging social data across your enterprise.

shopperLately, we have been meeting with marketing, sales, services and IT executives at very large Financial Services, Consumer Products, Retail and Technology companies. They have all made significant progress in deploying social customer relationship management (Social CRM) capabilities, but are looking for more automated and powerful ways to socially enable their external customer facing functions. In essence, they want to do more with their Social Data. With enterprise data growth expected to continue at 40% through 2020, driven by consumer generated content, getting value from this data is becoming increasingly and strategically important.

In this post, we’ll cover the basics of first implementing a Social CRM approach, and the value your enterprise specific social data. In a future blog post, we will cover more advanced “next” steps in how to leverage social data within your enterprise’s Big Data Analytics, Business Intelligence and Customer Experience Management deployed applications and systems.

Below is a diagram that highlights a general process for leveraging Social Data as part of an overall Social CRM approach. Think of this as a process that tracks your social efforts across your customers’ life-cycles, starting with listening and point-to-point engagement to more broadcast communications efforts in a repeatable and flexible fashion.

Social CRM Process

chart

1. Listen.  The enterprise wants to listen to what people (customers, prospects, and influencers) are saying about their brand on social media channels.

  • Your customers are talking about your brand on social media channels. They are posting, tweeting, commenting, sharing, complaining and liking your brand.
  • Through Social Listening, the enterprise should figure out what their constituents are saying en mass, analyze sentiment, hear what they like and don’t like about your product, and know if they intend to purchase your product or not.
  • Your social listening approach needs to be accurate and filter out the irrelevant “noise”, to get to pure customer signal for analytics and engagement.

2. Engagement (1-on-1) The enterprise wants to engage with relevant social signals to interact with their customers, and determine how those 1-on-1 engagements perform. 

  • This can be done by asking your customers various questions, responding to their posts and comments, and creating engagement applications like contests and polls. 
  • Your social engagement should be used to listen and respond to social posts. Social posts should be automatically categorized by your Listen engine and flow from multiple social networks into one “inbox” designed to make managing your community easy and efficient, within your appropriate business function (sales, marketing and support).

3. Content and Apps (within your Enterprise’s Social Assets) The enterprise should leverage the lessons learned from your 1:1 engagements to scale what works within relevant content and apps you create, whether it’s user-generated contests, polls, videos, or other interactive content.

4. Publish (message through your social channels’ communities) The enterprise should continue to build on its learning on all your interactions with your fans and followers to publish and amplify relevant content to multiple social media channels.

  • Create great looking landing pages and publish to multiple social networks or embed on any website. 
  • This should be done specifically within your various channels focused on marketing, sales, service, and commerce.

5. Managed Workflows The enterprise should develop and deploy specific workflows so your assigned business functions (Sales, Marketing, Service and Commerce) are communicating the right message to the right customer at the right place and the right time.  

  • Social media teams are growing and becoming more global. Why take the risk of someone in your organization publishing off-brand information?
  • By using your listening engine to auto-tag customer signals, managed by function appropriate workflows, you can better control your points of communication (1:1, through content, apps and publishing) to improve ROI.

6. Analytics. The enterprise should create a culture that always analyzes your results and metrics to quickly capture lessons learned to establish a continuous improvement process.

  • This will enable you to show ROI on all your social media investments, pre, during & post-campaign across your owned & earned media to improve social performance.
  • This helps you optimize your efforts over time to get more lift and value from your resource and communications spend.

Makes Sense?

Once your enterprise has this Social CRM approach in place and functioning, you can take the broader “next” step to amplify your social value through integration into your other core applications, which we’ll cover in a future post.

To whet your appetite, you can socially enable your enterprise by creating a 360o view of your enterprise customers (both content and profile) to support:

*Business analytics across all forms of structured (customer transactional and behavioral data), semi-structured (enterprise text sources that capture your internal customer conversations via chat, email, call center, etc.), and Social CRM unstructured data for:

  • Big Data insight discovery – finding insights you did not know existed
  • Business Intelligence - developing dynamic, real-time dashboards, reports and alerts for rapid decision-making.
*Customer Experience Management applications already deployed and in use by your enterprise’s Customer Service, Sales and Service/Support functions for near real-time action (customer experience management).

Friday Apr 12, 2013

Mad Men is Just a Show: How to Be the CMO of the Future

baby macLife has changed, and is still in the process of changing for the CMO.  The marketing opportunities of social, of emerging technologies, of mobile, the rising importance of content, the addition of social data to big data, and how social is changing the enterprise experience have all evolved the required skillset of the position. Since these consumer behaviors are highly unlikely to reverse, I picked the brain of Oracle VP Product Management for Cloud Social Erika Brookes for a look at what today’s CMO should seek to fully understand going forward.

The Customer Owns Your Brand

  • Understand the customer is now in charge and should be the focus. Their expectation is to be respected and treated well. Anything less disappoints.
  • Understand that phenomenal products and services, and personalized, hyper-attentive customer service is the new marketing.
  • Understand social is how the public is choosing to engage with each other and brands, and has kicked word-of-mouth into overdrive. The public is talking about you.
  • Understand social is not a megaphone for ads. Try to internalize how mistrustful of push messaging people are and that the path to drawing attention is to provide something of real value.
  • Understand you’ve got to lead crowd-pleasing content creation efforts, or find people who do know how to entertain/inform.

The Marketer Must Speak API

  • Understand you can no longer be comfortable in what you don’t know. You have to jump into technology head-on, knowing how it will deliver business value.
  • Understand you’ll be collaborating with the CIO and IT to leverage technological advantages faster than ever. You must have a voice on tech matters and implementation.
  • Understand the unprecedented gold mine of social data that, married with enterprise and 3rd party data, can paint an actionable picture of the customer.
  • Understand the importance of your brand’s mobile experience and how fast it’s becoming the primary way social is accessed.
  • Understand the cloud as the best technology practice for gathering, managing, analyzing and acting upon big data.

Know the Science Behind the Art

  • Understand campaigns should be built around what the consumer has shown you, through data, they like.
  • Understand not just social marketing, but social selling, social commerce, social service, social HR, social recruiting, and social collaboration.
  • Understand the value of listening, and how to extract worthwhile data from the noise.
  • Understand all of the social channels and platforms available to you, which targets are using them and how so appropriate strategies, messaging and measurement can be crafted for each.
  • Understand you have to keep moving toward proving the ROI behind the spend.

You Will Likely Conduct an Internal Symphony

  • Understand the changes going on inside the organization. Your role is expanding.
  • Understand that an unprecedented collaboration of people, processes and technology is being called for, and it’s probably you that must conduct that symphony.
  • Understand you have to communicate and align with sales for consistent brand and consumer experiences.
  • Understand you’ll play a large role in finding the technology partner to insure effective execution of social, a single vendor that offers every piece of the puzzle.
  • Understand that even in huge business enterprises, agility offers a competitive advantage and should be aspired to.

Below are some additional resources on the changing role of the CMO that might help you get to the future sooner rather than later.

Webinar with Oracle SVP Product Development for Cloud-Social Reggie Bradford and Forrester lead analyst David Cooperstein.

Social Spotlight Blog: Scandal! The CMO/CIO Relationship Revealed.

Video: “The changing role of the CMO.” Argyle Executive Forum’s 2013 Chief Marketing Officer Leadership Forum (New York).

@mikestiles
Photo: stock.xchng

Tuesday Apr 09, 2013

Do You Have a Clue What to Do Other Than Advertise?

Warning: before entering the social tech/marketing world, my background was about content creation. On radio, TV, stage, digital, or print, very little enthused me more than making “stuff” that informed and entertained the public, putting it out there and seeing what they thought of it. So I tend to get a little impassioned when I see what’s going on with marketers and content.

Here’s what’s going on. Very little.

stageNew research from Forrester recently re-emphasized (and I’m not sure how many different times and in how many different ways the public can emphasize this for us) faith in digital ads continues to drop.

9% of Americans and 8% of Europeans trust texts from brands. 10% and 8% trust web site banner ads. Mobile apps are trusted by 12% of Americans and 10% of Europeans. 18% of Americans trust emails compared to 11% of Europeans.

So there you go. The best you’re going to do when it comes to the public believing your digital ad is 18%. And that’s if they read it or watch it. But ads are what we know, so ads are what we keep doing, thinking the world is wrong…not us. As with many things, the consumer is showing us what they want from us, and we’re not listening. We want what we want, and we want full-on sales pitches. We feel like we’re not doing our jobs if we’re not pounding the product.

It’s a new day. You win with the quality of your product. You win by knocking customer and prospect socks off with CX and service. That’s the new marketing. But to get the public close enough so you can wow them with your goods and service, you’ve got to give them something else they value. Welcome to branded content.

The study showed many marketers still aren’t even quite sure what branded content is. Forrester defines it as “content developed or curated by a brand to provide added consumer value such as entertainment or education. It’s designed to build brand consideration and affinity, not sell a product or service. It is not a paid ad, sponsorship, or product placement.” That’s a good definition.

It’s noisy out there, and branded content is the window to something that’s harder to get than ever, awareness. That’s especially true on social. You have a stage, you have an audience sitting there staring at it, what are you putting on it? Or here’s another question. Have you even hired a producer to put on your show?

Forrester points out that even though almost 80% of marketers say they’re spending on branded content, few CMO’s have actually staffed for it. Some agencies get it, and are creatively capable. But their clients inevitably double-clutch and end up pushing the end product as close to a traditional digital ad as they can get it. And then they scream, “Why didn’t my ad go viral?!” Money wasted.

Get your in-house entertainer/journalist sooner rather than later. Their prices are about to leap. Loosen the grip on your content calendar so you can capitalize on trends and breaking news (think Oreo). Believe that as the presenting brand, viewers will give you full credit for giving them content they liked. And if you show people how awesome you are with your products and customer experience vs. trying to talk them into something with ads, you won’t be able to keep the raving fans away or stop them from spreading the word about you.

@mikestiles
Photo: stock.xchng

Friday Apr 05, 2013

Multitaskers Force Brands to Be Everywhere

multitaskingThe old joke used to be that someone couldn’t walk and chew gum at the same time.  Now we can walk, chew gum, do some needlepoint, play Words With Friends, listen to an audiobook, do isometric stomach crunches, hum, take in the smells of the city, and mentally go over your to-do list…all at the same time.

We are a multitasking species. We’re everywhere, and we’re using everything at our disposal to accomplish tasks, amuse ourselves, or take in information. Multiple people multitasking means multiple devices, which leaves brands trying to figure out which devices to focus on.

Well, you are also expected to multitask. So the answer is “all of them.” Your instinct might be to say, “Hey, they’re only going to engage with us one device at a time, and if we’re on every device, we’re just going to have our device strategies cannibalizing each other.”

A presentation at Oracle CloudWorld NYC with SVP Product Strategy for Oracle Social Reggie Bradford and NBCUniversal CMO John Miller showed otherwise.

The Olympics were the most watched event in TV history - 217 million viewers. 82 million were reached via digital platforms. There were 2 billion Page views, 65 million live streams and 8 million app downloads.

As it turns out, the more screens/ways there were to experience Olympic content, the more time was spent on all devices, with no cannibalization. Overall usage and engagement simply went…up.

With TV only, time spent consuming was 4 hours, 19 minutes. When the PC/laptop was added in, it was 5:18. Add in mobile, it was 6:50. Toss in tablets and we’re at 8:29. Not only did more screen increase overall consumption time, the addition of secondary screens such as tablet resulted in increased viewing on the primary screen, TV.

Consumer multitasking doesn’t hurt, it helps.

25% of time spent watching the competitions on TV was accompanied by the use of another screen. 50% of site, app, and mobile users watched while watching TV. And, of course, social fueled engagement, with 7 out of 10 viewers 13-34 saying it “made them more interested in watching the Games on TV.”

Okay, you might not be the Olympics, but the message is that when people find content they like, they seek out more of it in multiple places. That means we should strategize across all devices based on consumers’ multi-device behaviors, which a Microsoft study broke down into 4 categories in order of frequency.

Content Grazing: using 2+ screens simultaneously to do unrelated things.  
Investigative Spider-Webbing: using one device to get info related to what you’re doing on another.
Quantum Journey: using multiple devices sequentially to accomplish a task.
Social Spider-Webbing: sharing content on one device about what you did or found on another.

Does this apply to brands and revenue? Google/Nielsen found out 63% of shoppers used multiple devices to help with holiday purchases last year. And PricewaterhouseCoopers says 56% of US consumers spent more with a retailer since they started shopping across multiple channels.

What brands offer must match what consumers are doing. And that means multitasking on multiple devices.

@mikestiles

 

Tuesday Apr 02, 2013

It’s Personal: Reaching Mobile Via Social

Now that we’re learning the degree to which mobile is taking over the world, we’d better figure out how to best reach those devices, what content to employ, and how to do that without fostering negative vibes toward our brands.

mobile dateFirst, a reminder mobile is indeed taking over the world. Mobile accounts for 13% of global Internet traffic, with over 1.1 billion smartphone subscribers. Comscore says mobile channels now account for 1 out of 3 digital media minutes consumed. The US smartphone market has exceeded 50% market penetration, and the number of smartphone subscribers has gone up 99% from 2 years ago.

Second, a reminder of how strong social is on mobile. The eMarketer webinar “Social Media Marketing on Mobile Devices” showed an increase in users who engage in Facebook exclusively on mobile. In just one quarter, such users jumped from 126 million to 157 million. The time spent on mobile social apps grew 387% during 2012, beating out media/entertainment (+268%) and shopping (+247%) apps.

So it starts getting clear that social, be it a social app or social components threaded through other app experiences, is the key to the kingdom. Why? Because social is familiar and intimately personal.

Familiar: 
Why reinvent the wheel? Why put up an interface users have to “learn” when there’s already something they know and love? Weave familiar social actions through everything you do and the wheels are greased for the kind of engagement you want.

A Rhythm NewMedia study shows mobile campaigns that incorporate social calls-to-action are on the rise, and working. 30% of interactive in-stream campaigns included social buttons in the creative, which boosted engagement 36%.

Intimately Personal:
Public as it is, users tend to regard their social space as controlled, highly customized to their specifications, and personal. They use social to share with “friends,” making it an intimate place. Does this shut you out? Quite the contrary, it presents an incredible opportunity.

Digiday asked several experts what mobile’s next big opportunity is for brands. Most answers spoke to knowing the customer so incredibly well that highly customized, personalized experiences can be delivered. Anticipatory content delivery, targeting, personalized product research, and certainly attentive, rapid, personal customer service can get brands in customers’ intimate circle of trust. Execute that on what most users regard as a highly personal item, their device, and you’ve achieved the prime goal of welcomed access to them through that device.

An integrated, holistic, enterprise-wide social management suite is a foundation of that intimate knowledge of the customer. We at Oracle would love to get a snapshot of your mobile world. Take a minute and tell us what you have and what you want in the below survey.

@mikestiles

About

Get the latest changes and innovations to social technology platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube, and learn where social marketing trends are headed.

Connect With Us

Twitter

Search

Categories
Archives
« April 2013 »
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
 
1
3
4
6
7
8
10
11
13
14
15
17
18
20
21
22
24
25
27
28
29
    
       
Today