Friday Jun 24, 2016

Master Oracle SOA Suite 12c by Lucas Jellema

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Design, implement, manage, and maintain a highly flexible service-oriented computing infrastructure across your enterprise using the detailed information in this Oracle Press guide. Written by an Oracle ACE director, Oracle SOA Suite 12c Handbook uses a start-to-finish case study to illustrate each concept and technique. Learn expert techniques for designing and implementing components, assembling composite applications, integrating Java, handling complex business logic, and maximizing code reuse. Runtime administration, governance, and security are covered in this practical resource.

  • Get started with the Oracle SOA Suite 12c development and run time environment
  • Deploy and manage SOA composite applications
  • Expose SOAP/XML REST/JSON through Oracle Service Bus
  • Establish interactions through adapters for Database, JMS, File/FTP, UMS, LDAP, and Coherence
  • Embed custom logic using Java and the Spring component
  • Perform fast data analysis in real time with Oracle Event Processor
  • Implement Event Drive Architecture based on the Event Delivery Network (EDN)
  • Use Oracle Business Rules to encapsulate logic and automate decisions
  • Model complex processes using BPEL, BPMN, and human task components
  • Establish KPIs and evaluate performance using Oracle Business Activity Monitoring
  • Control traffic, audit system activity, and encrypt sensitive data

For more information please visit the website here. For additional books please visit our SOA wiki here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Tuesday Jun 14, 2016

Visualizations are far more than a pretty face on the cloud

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Visualizations are probably the most effective way to convey information, insights and prompts for action to humans. We are not terribly good at quickly and correctly interpreting textual information that require sequential processing. Our brains however are very well equipped to rapidly interpret information presented in a well defined visualization. The expression ‘one picture says more than a thousand words’ is one that speaks volumes (and a picture capturing that expression would of course tell us even more…).

Visualizations were omnipresent at last week’s Oracle OpenWorld 2015 conference. From keynote sessions by Larry Ellison and Thomas Kurian to the demo grounds where SaaS applications as well as development tools, PaaS services and other products were demonstrated, visualizations were everywhere. In part because they look nice and have an immediate appeal. But far more than just eye candy, visualizations are truly very effective in many use cases – especially when rapid responses to real time findings are required or where decisions need to be made based on deep insight in trends, patterns, correlations and underlying causes.

Glance, Scan, Commit

At the heart of Oracle’s strategic design philosophy for [cloud]user experience is the ‘glance, scan, commit’ way of working we humans tend to adopt. We scan our surroundings for things that stand out in some way and therefore may require more attention. The things that attracted attention on our first scan are then glanced at – to better understand what makes them stand out, quickly interpret if action is indeed required (such as more in depth investigations, decisions or execution of a workflow or business process). Some things can perhaps be done on the fly (accept/reject, send left or right, acknowledge) and are immediately removed from the to-do list. For others we may determine that nothing further needs to be done. Then there are more involved tasks that are the end result of the scan and glance stages. These tasks form a to do list of things that we need to work on – commit ourselves to – either instantaneously or at a later moment. (see  Strategic design philosophy pushes Oracle cloud user experience to lofty new heights by Kathy Miedema for more details on this philosophy).

Glance, Scan and Commit are implemented throughout Oracle’s SaaS applications. Users typically start from an initial dashboard that provides them the information they need to perform the Glance. This is typically information that is the outcome of aggregations and advanced data analysis – resulting in condensed reports of those facts that the user needs to be aware of, needs to react to or decide upon. This information should be presented in such as way that the ‘cost of understanding is minimized’ – as Jairam Ramanathan, Senior Development Manager for Data Visualizations at Oracle Cloud and Mobility Development Tools puts it.

Usually this means that the presentation shows a recent change or trend, a comparison with a threshold, deadline or other target or a list of action items. Data Visualizations are used to present these elements in a way that makes them easy to interpret quickly and correctly. Compared with a purely textual representation, most visualizations can easily add context – such as time or location – and categorizations or grouping. Visualizations can leverage special traits of our human minds. These include our ability to quickly interpret, compare and spot differences in position, shape and size, color (to some extent) and extract a story from animation. Our brain’s associative powers quickly come into play with visualizations.

Jeremy Ashley, GVP Cloud Applications UX at Oracle and responsible for the Glance, Scan, Commit philosophy, stresses that visualizations may not be too simplistic, or our brain simply zooms out. A visualization needs to hold a certain challenge in order to pique our curiosity.

Visualizations not only cater for the glance phase, they can usually also play an important role in the scan phase. Visualizations can allow drill down, to analyze a little further and look in more details into specific areas of interest indicated during glance. Additionally, visualizations may go beyond just presenting the data and also support simple manipulation of data – for example adjusting a gauge or dragging elements on a time line or even a bubble chart. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Thursday Apr 28, 2016

Process Analytics with Oracle BPM Suite 12c and BAM – slides from OGh session for SIG SOA & BPM by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002Business Processes implemented in BPEL and BPM(N) and running on Oracle BPM Suite 12c or SOA Suite 12c have to fulfill a business purpose and as such must meet business requirements – both functionally and non-functionally. SLAs for throughput, response time, quality are usually associated with these processes and we typically also would like insight in the number of process executions (per group) and the paths taken through our processes.

This presentation introduces process analytics in both BPEL and BPM processes in Oracle SOA Suite and BPM Suite 12c. It explains how to configure out of the box generic analytics and process specific business indicators. The presentation than introduces BAM 12c. It demonstrates the out of the box process analytics reports and dashboards. Then it explains how to create custom reports on the unified process analytics star schema or on custom tables. Finally the presentation goes into real-time monitoring in BAM using JMS and enterprise message resources in combination with the event processing templates in BAM. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Tuesday Dec 01, 2015

Key take-aways from the Oracle PaaS Cloud announcements – Integrate, Accelerate, Lead by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002Monday June 22nd was the launch date for Oracle for 24 (and more) Cloud Services. June is traditionally an important month for Oracle when it comes to product launches and important announcements. This year is the same in that respect. The announcements came in a many-hour live webcast including a 45 minute presentation by Oracle CTO Larry Ellison (see videos from Oracle Cloud Platform Launch). I have harvested some of the most relevant slides from this presentation – that capture the essence from his announcements (or at least the things that stood out to me).

See some other relevant resources regarding these announcements:

Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Thursday Nov 05, 2015

SOA Suite Handbook preview by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002Part I – “Setting the Stage” – introduces the case of Saibot Airport and the business and IT challenges it faces. The path the airport has laid down for itself in order to create its future and the IT architecture and technology it has selected is discussed along with the core concepts that make up Service-Oriented Architecture. The history of Oracle Fusion Middleware is described as well as its current status. The focus then moves to a detailed overview of SOA Suite 12c, its main constituents and closely associated products such as Managed File Transfer, API Catalog, API Manager, B2B and Healthcare. This part concludes with a very quick start-up instruction which includes the installation of SOA Suite 12c development environment, ready for the creation and deployment of the HelloWorld equivalent in SOA applications.

Chapter 1 – Saibot Airport reaching for the Future

This chapter introduces Saibot Airport as an organization with a vision and a business strategy, and one that depends heavily on IT to fulfill the strategy. The IT department itself is confronted by changing industry trends, new technology and an evolution in the way it organizes its processes. From all of these, architecture consequences are derived. And finally, technology products have to be selected to start the realization of the information and application architecture designed to enable the IT and business objectives. Read more about Lucas upcoming book here. Looking for additional SOA Suite book? Visit our wiki here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Tuesday Nov 03, 2015

Stream Explorer and JMS for both inbound and outbound interaction by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002In this article, we will look at the very common interaction between Stream Explorer and JMS. JMS is a commonly used channel for decoupled exchange of messages or events. Stream Explorer can both consume messages from a JMS destination (through Stream) and publish findings to a JMS destination (with a target). The use case we discuss here is about temperature sensors: small devices distributed over a building, measuring the local room temperature every few seconds and reporting it over JMS. The Stream Explorer application has to look out for rooms with quickly increasing temperatures and report those over a second JMS queue. Note: this article describes the Java (SE) code used for generating temperature signals. This class generates temperature values (in Celsius!) for a number of rooms, and publishes these to the queue temperatureMeasurements. At some random point, the class will start a fire in a randomly selected room. In this room, temperatures will soon be over 100 degrees. Also in this article is Java class HotRoomAlertProcessor  that consumes messages from a second JMS Queue. Any message received on that queue is reported to the console.

Our objective in this article is to read the temperature measurements from the JMS Queue into a Stream Explorer application, calculate the average value per room and then detect the room on fire. This hot room should then be reported to the JMS Queue.

Open Stream Explorer and from the Stream Explorer Catalog page, create a new item of type Stream. Select JMS as the source type. Read the whole article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Friday Sep 11, 2015

SOA Suite 12c – Create, Deploy, Attach and Configure a Custom OWSM Policy – to report on service execution by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002This article describes how to develop a straightforward custom assertion that can be used as part of custom OWSM policy to be attached to Web Services in WebLogic, such as services exposed by SOA Composite applications and Service Bus projects as well as custom JAX-WS or ADF BC Web Services. The custom assertion that I demonstrate here reports the execution of web service operations to a JMS Destination and/or the system output. It shows how to access property values set on the policy binding (values specific for the service the policy is attached to) and how to inspect the headers and contents of the request and response messages. Most custom assertions will use a subset of the mechanisms shown in this example. As always, the source code is available for download. Note: this article was edited on April 6th to reflect better code structure.

Custom assertions can be used in policies that are applied to web services. Depending on the type and configuration of the policy and assertions, they can be triggered at different moments and perform different tasks. These assertions are similar to aspects (in AOP) that take care of cross cutting concerns and that do not interfere with the internals of a service. Policies are attached (and detached) at runtime by the administrators. The assertion discussed in this article is to be attached to the service binding at the inbound end of a SOA composite application (or at a Service Bus proxy service that serves the same purpose). The assertion will report every incoming request as well as each response returned from the service binding. This information can be leveraged outside the scope of this article to monitor the runtime service environment.

The steps describes in this article in the process of creating and putting into action the custom assertion are:

  • Create Custom Policy:
    • Assertion Java Class
    • Policy XML File
    • Policy Configuration XML File
  • Deploy Policy Artifacts to Runtime Fusion Middleware platform (and restart the WebLogic Servers)
  • Import Policy Definition into Runtime Fusion Middleware platform
  • Attach the Policy to a Service Binding in an existing SOA Composite application and configure the policy binding properties
  • Invoke the service exposed by the [Service Binding in the existing] SOA Composite application
  • Verify the results produced by the policy attachment
Create the Custom Policy

The main part of the custom assertion definition is a Java class. See for details the sources that can be downloaded from GitHub.The project contains a helper class – CustomAssertion – that takes care of some generic plumbing that are required for the AssertionExecutor superclass that needs to be extended. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Monday Aug 24, 2015

SOA Suite 12c – Create, Deploy, Attach and Configure a Custom OWSM Policy – to report on service execution by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002This article describes how to develop a straightforward custom assertion that can be used as part of custom OWSM policy to be attached to Web Services in WebLogic, such as services exposed by SOA Composite applications and Service Bus projects as well as custom JAX-WS or ADF BC Web Services. The custom assertion that I demonstrate here reports the execution of web service operations to a JMS Destination and/or the system output. It shows how to access property values set on the policy binding (values specific for the service the policy is attached to) and how to inspect the headers and contents of the request and response messages. Most custom assertions will use a subset of the mechanisms shown in this example. As always, the source code is available for download. Note: this article was edited on April 6th to reflect better code structure.

Custom assertions can be used in policies that are applied to web services. Depending on the type and configuration of the policy and assertions, they can be triggered at different moments and perform different tasks. These assertions are similar to aspects (in AOP) that take care of cross cutting concerns and that do not interfere with the internals of a service. Policies are attached (and detached) at runtime by the administrators. The assertion discussed in this article is to be attached to the service binding at the inbound end of a SOA composite application (or at a Service Bus proxy service that serves the same purpose). The assertion will report every incoming request as well as each response returned from the service binding. This information can be leveraged outside the scope of this article to monitor the runtime service environment.

The steps describes in this article in the process of creating and putting into action the custom assertion are:

  • Create Custom Policy:
    • Assertion Java Class
    • Policy XML File
    • Policy Configuration XML File
  • Deploy Policy Artifacts to Runtime Fusion Middleware platform (and restart the WebLogic Servers)
  • Import Policy Definition into Runtime Fusion Middleware platform
  • Attach the Policy to a Service Binding in an existing SOA Composite application and configure the policy binding properties
  • Invoke the service exposed by the [Service Binding in the existing] SOA Composite application
  • Verify the results produced by the policy attachment
Create the Custom Policy

The main part of the custom assertion definition is a Java class. See for details the sources that can be downloaded from GitHub.The project contains a helper class – CustomAssertion – that takes care of some generic plumbing that are required for the AssertionExecutor superclass that needs to be extended. The class SOASuiteServiceExecutionReporter contains the custom logic that is to be executed whenever the policy assertion is triggered. In the current case, this logic consists of retrieving some key elements about the service request – service name, operation name, ECID, timestamp and selected payload details – and reporting them. Initially, this report consists of a few lines in the system output (i.e. the domain log file). Later on, we will send the report to a JMS destination. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Saturday Aug 15, 2015

Demonstration of Stream Explorer for live device monitoring – collect, filter, aggregate, pattern match, enrich and publish by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002This article describes a use case for Oracle Stream Explorer – Oracle’s business user friendly interface on top of OEP – Oracle Event Processor. We assume a large number of devices – such as printers, copiers, sensors, detectors, coffee machines – spread across the globe – and the cloud.

All devices continuously report their status, by sending a message every other second that contains their device identifier, a code that can indicate the healthy status or an error and some additional details. The sheer number of devices combined with the continuous stream of reports they sent in set the challenges perimeters within which we have to implement fast and effective monitoring. Our specific challenge is: “whenever a device reports an error code three times within 10 seconds, we consider that device broken, and action should be taken” (that also means that we do not spring into action on the first or even second fault report from a device). Additionally: we only require a single action for a broken device – once the action is initiated, we do not have to start an action again for that same device – unless of course it is broken again at a much later point in time.

The concrete implementation described in this article looks as follows:

For the sake of a simple demonstration, we read device message reports from a csv file, instead of a live stream such as a JMS destination or an HTTP channel. Note that the Stream Explorer implementation would be exactly the same for these other stream types. Stream Explorer processes the device signals. For signals that satisfy the requirements of a broken device, the information is enriched from a database with device details – such as the physical location of the device – and finally an EDN event is composed and published. This event is consumed by a SOA Composite application in the SOA Suite 12c environment. This composite can virtually do anything, including assigning a task, starting a BPM process or sending an email.

The implementation described in this article is also demonstrated in a video on YouTube: Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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