Tuesday Dec 22, 2015

MTOM using SoapUI and OSB by Martien van den Akker

clip_image001MTOM (Message Transmission Optimization Mechanism) is incredibly hard... to find practical information about, on SoapUI and OSB. There are loads of articles. Like:

But I need to process documents that are send using MTOM to my service. And to be able to test it, I need to create a working example of a SoapUI project to do exactly that. Also about SoapUI and MTOM there are loads of examples, and it is quite simple really. But I had a more complex wsdl that I was able to use for Soap with Attachments (SwA) wich is also simple really. But how to connect those two in a simple working example? Well, actually, it turns out not so hard either... So bottom-line, MTOM with SoapUI and OSB is not so hard. If you know how, that is.
So let's work this out on a step-by-step basis.

XSD/WSDL

I'll start with a simple XSD: Read the complete article here.

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Friday Dec 18, 2015

How to customize your Service Bus 12c pipeline templates by Jan van Zoggel

clip_image001One of the new features in Service Bus 12c is the ability to use pipeline templates. Usually the Oracle Service Bus pipelines in an environment have many common steps. Think of the re-use of logging, error handling, alerts and pattern + naming convention for your stages. In practice with OSB 11g we often used a “template” or existing OSB project which we then copied and modified. With the “clone” option of 12c this task is already easier, but the use of pipeline templates is even better. Since templates and concrete pipelines (generated pipelines from a template) remain linked we can update our services easier with new insights. For example, when you want to change your default logging or fault handling behavior.

Index:

To use pipeline templates to their fullest potential we can customize them to our own needs. For this we have multiple options.

Generic configuration

The essential configuration of most actions can be left empty in the template without any problem. As soon as they are implemented in concrete pipelines the actions there will come into an ERROR state. The example below shows the Routing which is empty in the pipeline template. When developing the concrete pipelines we can then easily set the correct business service. Read the complete article here.

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Wednesday Sep 16, 2015

OSB Release Management Utility by Joao Moura

clip_image002Agile methodologies have increased radically the numbers of release events in organisations where it has been adopted.  Both development and operations teams need to collaborate more closely during production release events requiring more than ever the right supporting tools.

How many times have you been asked what has been deployed in environment X?

If you are using CI tools and doing release management properly it should be a straightforward answer. However, software deployment comprises a set of steps involving multiple parties. As a result, the process isn't entirely automated requiring human intervention which is susceptible to errors.

Imagine you have just delivered an OSB Production bundle to the operations guys (DBAs, Weblogic Admins…).

How can you prove that the expected jar has been deployed without looking at the source code or running any tests ?

We are using a custom Release Management Utility that saves us a lot of time and headaches ☺

· No third-party software required; It uses Hudson, SVN, Maven and OSB

· Allows users without technical knowledge to view what’s deployed

· Identifies project changes between sprints

· Track back to source code based on SVN revision

· Displays build date and version for each individual project

Read the complete article here.

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Tuesday Sep 15, 2015

Searching Service Bus Pipeline Alert contents by Maarten Smeets

clip_image001There are several ways monitor messages passing through the Service Bus. Using pipeline alerts is one of them. Pipeline alerts can be searched in the Enterprise Manager based on several parameters such as summary or when they have occurred. Usually an important part of the message payload is saved in the content of the alert. This content can not be searched from the Enterprise Manager. In this post I will provide an example for logging Service Bus request and response messages using pipeline alerts and a means to search alert contents for a specific occurrence. The example provided has been created in SOA Suite 12.1.3 but the script also works in SOA Suite 11.1.1.6.
Service Bus Pipeline Alerts

The Oracle Service Bus provides several monitoring mechanisms. These can be tweaked in the Enterprise Manager.

In this example I’m going to use Pipeline Alerts. Where you can find them in the Enterprise Manager has been described on: https://technology.amis.nl/2014/06/27/soa-suite-12c-where-to-find-service-bus-pipeline-alerts-in-enterprise-manager-fusion-middleware-control/. I’ve created a small sample process called HelloWorld. This process can be called with a name and returns ‘Hello name’ as a response. The process itself has a single AlertDestination and has two pipeline alerts. One for the request and one for the response. These pipeline alerts write the content of the header en body variables to the content field of the alert.

When I call this service with ‘Maarten’ and with ‘John’, I can see the created pipeline alerts in the Enterprise Manager. Read the complete article here.

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Monday Jul 20, 2015

CI using Oracle Fusion Middleware 12C: Part 2. Building a SB and SOA project using maven and the MDS by Hugo Hendriks

clip_image001In the part 1 I have shown how to setup a simple CI environment and how to build a Service Bus project using Maven. In this part I will try to make a release pipeline which builds, deploys, tests, packages and release a whole service using Jenkins and if all successful and finally install the artifact in Nexus.

Lets start where we left of. Startup Tomcat and log into Jenkins. We need some sort of plugin to be able to run multiple actions in a sequence. Jenkins has alot of plugins but the one which I am going to use is the MultiJob one. Go to Manage Jenkins->Manage plugins, choose the available tab, check the Multijob plugin and click Install without restart.

The multi-job plugin can chain jobs together and share variables and artifact between jobs. You can make very intricate jobs but for now I will keep it simple. I will make 1 job that will:

  1. Build the service bus component which also refers to a SharedObjects project and deploy it to my server
  2. Build the soa component which also refers to the MDS and deploy it to my server
  3. Run the matching soap ui test
  4. If succesfull, install the artifact to nexus

I have created a simple HelloService which first goes to the SB and then routes to a SOA component. The SB component makes use of a SharedObjects SB project which holds the WSDL and XSD. This project is setup so you don’t have to sync between this project and the MDS. This because the SB isn’t able yet to access the MDS. The SOA component does nothing else the return a string response. So the setup will look like this: Read the complete article here.

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Saturday Jul 18, 2015

How to use the Domain Value Map (DVM) in Oracle Service Bus 12c by Jan van Zoggel

Introduction

clip_image002Due to the tighter integration of Oracle Service Bus 12c in the whole Oracle SOA Suite product it’s now much easier for developers to use general SOA Suite components like the Domain Value Map (DVM).

Getting Started

First I use the OSB 12c clone project ability to copy th earlier created/blogged OSB 12c Database adapter project and create a project named GetCaseServiceDVM. In the new project we add a Domain Value Map (DVM):

The file name and description speak for themself. The Initial DVM Entries forces us to define the minimum amount of 2 domain names (source and target of our value) and if we want we can inmediately configure the 1st record here.

The result is a DVM file in our project which we can easily edit within JDeveloper 12c.
For this blogpost we will add 2 records which will allow us to translate the value “1” and “2” which we receive from the database to a basic description of that value. Read the complete article here.

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Sunday May 24, 2015

https://soacommunity.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/mobile-suite-service-bus-rest-and-adf-bc-soap-by-andrejus-baranovskis/


clip_image002One of the key parts of Oracle Mobile Suite 12c offering is Service Bus product. This is logical choice - Service Bus allows to transform complex SOAP Web Service data into simplified REST format, preferred by mobile client. I think it is essential to use Service Bus, when implementing enterprise mobile applications. It makes sense to learn how Oracle Service Bus works. I would recommend to start from Steven Davelaar excellent tutorial article, available here - Creating a Mobile-Optimized REST API Using Oracle Service Bus – Part 2.
I have created my own ADF BC application with SOAP WS - findEmployees method (filters by first and last name). Here you can download both applications - MobileServiceBusApp_v1.zip. Keep in mind, for some reason Service Bus server doesn't start with JDEV 12c BPM Default Domain, it works only with JDEV 12c SOA Default Domain. Make sure to check, which JDEV you are using, you can check the list features installed: ADF BC SOAP service is implemented to support Master-Detail (Employee - Department Managed by Employee) structure: Read the complete article here.

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Sunday Mar 22, 2015

XSLT and DVMs – Design Time Execution in Oracle Service Bus 12c by Jennie DeRosa

clip_image002Within Oracle Service Bus 11g, there is not an easy way to reference Domain Value Maps (DVM), like there is in Oracle SOA Suite 11g Composites. Typically, a kluge solution is implemented as a workaround in a Service Bus 11g project. With Oracle Service Bus 12c, this has changed, DVMs are now accessible in XQuery and XSL maps.

While this is good news, the even better news is that XSL maps which contain references to DVMs can now be successfully executed at design time, allowing for testing within JDeveloper. Testing of XSL maps at design time is always a good practice, it allows for catching bugs early in the development process.

Within this article, I will provide an overview of the configurations required to enable testing an XSL map at design time, which references a DVM within an Oracle Service Bus 12c project.

Overview of creation of a DVM along with publishing to the MDS repository can be found here: http://technology.amis.nl/2014/06/27/soa-suite-12c-using-domain-value-map-dvm-in-service-bus-projects/

One prerequisite step necessary when referencing a DVM outside of the current Service Bus project is to import the resource from the Meta Data Storage (MDS).  OSB 12c cannot contain references to resources, like a DVM, within the MDS repository. Rather, the resource needs to be imported into the Service Bus project, as shown below.

Select the DVM within the MDS repository and select ‘Import Resource’: Read the complete article here.

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Friday Mar 20, 2015

Caching in OSB 12c without Out-Of-Process Coherence Servers by Ricardo Ferreira

clip_image002Introduction

One of the most popular use cases for Oracle Service Bus (OSB) is the mediation of synchronous service interactions. In this scenario, a client invokes the service through a proxy instead of the actual service endpoint, guaranteeing that the consumer is decoupled from the producer. This type of architecture allows producers to be changed without impacting the consumers, allowing greater agility for projects with volatile requirements.

Synchronous services that return results that do not change often are good candidates to have their results cached by OSB, through a feature called Result Caching. This improves performance by reducing network overhead to access the back-end service. Result caching can help to improve scalability by reducing the load on the back-end servers that host the service. Figure 1 illustrates a client invoking a synchronous service with Result Caching enabled.

Although using the Result Caching feature may seem to always be a good idea, it is important to evaluate its side effects. When this feature is activated, all results are cached in the JVM heap. That means that heap can rapidly become full after a number of service invocations occur. This could lead to serious garbage collection (GC) issues once the JVM starts to reclaim the used space when it hits the high water-mark of 80% of the heap size. Eventually, full GC pauses will start to occur and jeopardize OSB performance.

To avoid using too much heap space with Result Caching, out-of-process Coherence servers can be set up to run in their own JVMs to hold the cached results. They are termed “out-of-process” because they execute in a JVM different from the OSB JVM. The technique here is to allocate data off the OSB JVM letting the Coherence servers use their own heap space without affecting the heap space OSB uses to process messages. This technique is also called off-heap caching. Figure 2 shows an OSB domain using out-of-process Coherence servers to hold the cached results. Read the complete article here.

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Thursday Mar 19, 2015

Service Bus 12c – Exposing a Pipeline as a REST Service by Jennie DeRosa

clip_image002Within Oracle Service Bus 12c, there are several ways to implement a pipeline as a REST service.

One approach is to REST enable an existing SOAP service. In this scenario, a pipeline is supported by both SOAP and REST based interactions. A video that provides a good overview of the required steps to implement this can be found here.

Another way is to derive it from a pipeline WSDL (REST bindings in OSB 12c are based on a WSDL document). The steps below detail the configurations required to accomplish this.

The first step is to create a pipeline that is a WSDL-based service. If the WSDL does not exist, it can be generated from a schema. To do this, select the ‘Create a WSDL’ icon in the Pipeline Service creation wizard to open the Create WSDL dialog.  Before selecting ‘Finish’, be sure the ‘Expose as a Proxy Service’ is not checked, since we will be generating a REST based proxy in a later step. Read the complete article here.

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