Thursday Jun 04, 2015

B2B 12c – HTTP Generic Channel with transport callout by Bruno Neves Alves

First of all, season's greetings to everyone!

Then, let me introduce this post saying that, already in the version 11g, a generic HTTP listening channel for message posting to B2B using the HTTP protocol was available. Any configured trading partner could use this generic channel to post messages to B2B.

A single common URL was available by default:
http://[host-name]:[host-port]/b2b/httpReceiver

In this way, a single listening channel is able to serve multiple trading partners for every HTTP communications with B2B.

When this channel is used, the process follows the default steps for message processing, namely:

Sender identification (i.e. using HTTP Header);

Document protocol/version/type identification ;

Agreement identification;

Message processing (parsing and validation);

Synchronous delivery to a back-end application.

The only differentiation factor is: since this channel is generic and not configurable or even available on the list of listening channels in B2B console, make it unavailable for channel callout configuration.

This has now changed with the 12c version.

With the version 12c of B2B is now possible to define a generic HTTP transport callout and associate it with a specific transport level callout.

As of now, this is driven by an B2B configuration Fusion Middleware property that needs to be added on Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control

Read the complete article here.

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Wednesday Jun 03, 2015

Middleware Partner Update June 2015

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The June edition of the Middleware Partner Update contains three key topics:

With this new format we will update you on the highlights of our partner news every month. For further information please read latest edition of the SOA & BPM Partner Community newsletter here. Watch the video here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Tuesday Jun 02, 2015

Inside Fusion Middleware 12c: Increasing Scalability with JMS Adapter 12c by Stefan Koser

clip_image002JMS Adapter (also known as Oracle JCA Adapter for JMS) is a component available with Oracle SOA Suite or Oracle Service Bus (OSB) which provides a very powerful way to use  the Java Messaging Service (JMS) for sending or receiving messages.

The most important goals for optimizing an SOA Suite or OSB environment are to make sure that

  • Each node of the cluster makes effective use of Java threads and other resources.
  • The cluster will be able to scale efficiently when adding new nodes.

In this article, we will show how JMS Adapter in the new release 12c can be configured in high throughput scenarios to use much fewer threads that in earlier versions. This means, that adding new nodes to the cluster will not require additional threads in all other nodes. As a result, a cluster with many nodes will perform and scale much better.

There are 2 main use cases of JMS Adapter with SOA Suite or OSB:

  • Inbound activation of a composite by receiving messages from a JMS destination (queue or topic)
  • Publishing messages from a composite to a JMS destination

We will focus in this article on the first use case for receiving messages. Only in that scenario – for listening to a queue, the activation framework of the Java EE Connector Architecture (JCA) layer will start a number of threads for JMS Adapter.

First, we will describe how many threads will be created by default or in versions prior to 12c, and then how this changes when using the new feature available with 12c.

Default thread creation for JMS Adapter

For the first example, we will assume a scenario with a 2-node SOA cluster where a Uniform Distributed Queue (UDQ) “jms/TestQueue” is defined and one SOA composite with an inbound JMS Adapter is listening to this queue. See line 2 of the JMS destination overview in Weblogic server in the following table:

With the default behavior, the number of threads used to read messages from this queue in each Java Virtual Machine (JVM) is one. This is derived from the default of the corresponding configuration parameter: Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Monday Jun 01, 2015

Protecting Sensitive Data in Oracle SOA Suite 12c by Jennie DeRosa

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Given the recent security breaches, data security should always be a concern when designing and creating IT solutions. In particular, what are some considerations that should be made when implementing a solution within the Oracle SOA Suite? Is it sufficient to protect the data using WS-Security/SSL or is additional security needed? If you have sensitive data traversing through the SOA Suite then additional security must be considered.

As noted within the National Institute Standards and Technology (NIST) publication, ‘to appropriately protect the confidentiality of personally identifiable information (PII), organizations should use a risk-based approach’. To understand what is considered PII, or sensitive data, along with recommendations to protect PII read Guide to Protecting the Confidentiality of Personally Identifiable Information.

WS-Security and SSL only will protect data outside a SOA composite or Service Bus. Once the data hits either one of these, it is viewable in clear text within audit trails, console or logs. This means sensitive data is viewable within the console and log, causing this data to be unencrypted at rest. An example of this is shown below. Anyone with access to EM (Enterprise Manager) could view the sensitive data just by opening the audit trail of a process: Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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SOA & BPM Community Webcasts June 30th 2015

Missed our May edition of the SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast – watch the recording here. In this webcast your get an update by Vikas Anand about our Cloud Platform for Digital Business. Including the Integration Success Workshops we offer and the Integration Cloud Service and Process Cloud Service pricing and reselling. Watch the Webcast on-demand here.


SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast – June 30th 2015

clip_image002Attend our June edition of the SOA & BPM Partner Community WebCast live on June 30th 2015 16:00 CET.


MONTHLY WEBCAST SOA & BPM PARTNER COMMUNITY
TUESDAY JUNE 30 2015 16:00 CET (UTC/GMT +1 Hour)

WATCH AND LISTEN You can join the Conference by clicking on the link:
Join Webcast (Employees and Partners) (audio will play over your computer speakers or headset

AND / OR DIAL IN Call ID: 5566478 Call Passcode: 333111

Austria: +43 (0) 192 865 12
Belgium: +32 (0) 240 105 28
Denmark: +45 327 292 22
Finland: +358 (0) 923 193 923
France: +33 (0) 15760 2222
Germany: +49 (0) 692 222 161 06
Ireland: +353 (0) 124 756 50
Italy: +39 (0) 236 008 198
Netherlands: +31 (0) 207 143 543
Spain: +34 914 143 755
Sweden: +46 (0) 856 619 465
Switzerland: +41 (0) 445 804 003
UK: +44 (0) 208 118 1001
United States: 140 877 440 73
More Local Numbers

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: Webcast,Vikas Anand,SOA Community,Oracle SOA,Oracle BPM,OPN,Jürgen Kress


SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: Webcast,Vikas Anand,SOA Community,Oracle SOA,Oracle BPM,OPN,Jürgen Kress

Purging data from Oracle SOA Suite 11g – Part 1 by C2B2

clip_image002The following questions will be answered:

    • How does Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) store data?
    • What data does Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) store?
    • Why do you need to purge Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) data?
    • What are the purging options available for Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7)?
    • Which data will be purged by the Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script?
    • List of composite instance states that will be considered for purging by the purge script
    • How to install the Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script?
    • How to execute the Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script?
    • What is Looped purging (Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script)?
    • What is Parallel purging (Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script)?
    • Description of parameters used by the Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script
    • Example 1: Executing the Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script for all composites
    • Example 2: Executing the Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) purge script for a specific composite

How does Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) store data?

SOA Suite uses a database schema called SOAINFRA (collection of database objects such as tables, views, procedures, functions etc.) to store data required for the running of SOA Suite applications. The SOAINFRA (SOA Infrastructure) schema is also referred to as the ‘dehydration store’ acting as the persistence layer for capturing SOA Suite data.

What data does Oracle SOA Suite 11g (PS6 11.1.1.7) store? Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Sunday May 31, 2015

Message Aggregation in Oracle SOA Suite 12c by Jennie DeRosa

clip_image002Within the Oracle SOA Suite, message aggregation is a concept that allows for multiple messages to be routed to the same BPEL process, based on a value(s) defined within the incoming payload. This is implemented within BPEL through the use of correlation sets.

To implement this, a correlation set is defined and will contain one or more properties. These properties have aliases to values within the input payload message (i.e. PurchaseOrderNumber), which are used for the correlation of messages.

Oracle SOA Suite 12c has provided a wizard that allows for easy definition of the correlation set, properties and property aliases which are all necessary for correlation to occur. Below are the steps required to configure your BPEL process to perform message aggregation via correlation set.

Configuration Steps

The first step is to create the Correlation Set. Right click on the initial receive of the process and select ‘Setup Correlation…’ Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Saturday May 30, 2015

Message Aggregation in Oracle SOA Suite 12c by Jennie DeRosa

clip_image002Within the Oracle SOA Suite, message aggregation is a concept that allows for multiple messages to be routed to the same BPEL process, based on a value(s) defined within the incoming payload. This is implemented within BPEL through the use of correlation sets.

To implement this, a correlation set is defined and will contain one or more properties. These properties have aliases to values within the input payload message (i.e. PurchaseOrderNumber), which are used for the correlation of messages.

Oracle SOA Suite 12c has provided a wizard that allows for easy definition of the correlation set, properties and property aliases which are all necessary for correlation to occur. Below are the steps required to configure your BPEL process to perform message aggregation via correlation set.

Configuration Steps

The first step is to create the Correlation Set. Right click on the initial receive of the process and select ‘Setup Correlation…’ Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Friday May 29, 2015

Building a Scalable, Highly Available Oracle API Gateway 11g Infrastructure in a Cloud Environment by Marcelo Parisi


clip_image002Introduction

One of the major challenges that companies face in adopting a cloud computing platform is the secure provisioning of services in the cloud. Oracle API Gateway (OAG) 11g can be a very powerful tool in this sense, since it focuses on service protection, with authentication mechanisms, message encryption, and security/policy functionalities.

In this article, we will see how to create a cloud-based OAG infrastructure, with high-availability and scalability support. Both high-availability and scalability operations will be covered here. We’ll be using virtual machines (VMs) and storage concepts, along with OAG and Oracle Traffic Director (OTD). While a physical load balancer will also be necessary, its configuration is beyond the scope of this article.

The service infrastructure—Oracle SOA Suite, Oracle Service Bus or any other kind of service provider environment that needs to be exposed in a secure manner through the environment we’ll be building—will also not be covered in this article.

This article assumes a Network File System (NFS) v4 and Network Information Service/Lightweight Directory Service Protocol (NIS/LDAP) compliant environment. If you don’t support it, the article will indicate the changes so that you can run on a NFSv3 environment without NIS/LDAP.

There is no capacity planning or sizing work done on this article. The number of CPUs, memory and filesystem size are all just for demonstration purposes and should be revisited in a production environment.

OAG and OTD documentation should always be consulted. This document is not intended to replace any of the product’s official documentation.

Finally, please note that OTD is supported only in Exalogic environments.

Infrastructure Architecture

In this article, we’re going to build a brand new infrastructure from scratch to support this environment. We’ll consider two VMs for OTD and, initially, three VMs for OAG, one of them for administration purposes only. The environment infrastructure architecture will resemble the architecture in Figure 1, below:

As you can see, we have high availability on both the OTD layer and the OAG layer. Both layers are scalable either horizontally or vertically. This article discusses scalability only on the OAG layer.

We’re going to create five VMs—three for OAG, with Oracle Linux 5.6; two with Oracle Linux 6.6 for OTD. I suggest using VM Templates or cloning to make this task easier. The VMs’ configuration should resemble the table in Figure 2, below: Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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SOA Suite 12c: Multithreaded instance purging with the Java API by Maarten Smeets

clip_image002Let’s tackle a single topic at a time in this blog post SOA Suite 12c provides a Java API to perform operations on the SOA infrastructure and things running there such as composites and instances. There are several blog posts available on how to do this in SOA Suite 10g and 11g. However since 12c is relatively new, I decided to try if I could easily access the Java API in 12c and if the API was still similar to 11g or had undergone major changes. As a usecase I decided I wanted to purge instances. This is usually done by database scripts on the SOA infra database. If however you do not have direct access to the database, this can be used as an alternative. I could of course have done the same by using WLST. I found that purging instances by using the Java API was slow so I decided I would like to try this using multiple threads working in parallel. The resulting code is provided in this post.

Implementation

In order to separate the different topics which will be discussed in this blog post I split the implementation in three parts. JDeveloper 12c, Purging composites and Multithreading.

JDeveloper 12c. Using the SOA Suite Java API

In JDeveloper 11g I would have to add the required libraries in the project properties and I could create a Java class which could access the Java API. In JDeveloper 11g I would have to add the following library references: WebLogic 10.3 Remote-Client, SOA Runtime, JRF API. I decided to try the same in JDeveloper 12c. When adding the SOA Runtime however, JDeveloper 12c decided I would want to develop a composite and ‘refactored’ my project to allow development of composites. This wasn’t what I wanted however. In order to avoid this issue/feature I decided to add a single JAR to my 12c project containing required classes instead of using the SOA Runtime library reference. I added oracle.soa.wlstman.jar from my ORACLE_HOME/soa/soa/oracle.soa.fabric.11.1.1 folder (yes, the 11.1.1 folder is still there in 12.1.3). I of course also needed to add Weblogic 12.1 Remote-Client and JRF API to get it working. I have not tried manually editing the pom.xml to include the SOA Runtime dependency, so I can not say if this will avoid the project refactoring done by JDeveloper. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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