Friday Feb 27, 2015

BPM & SOA Application missing in JDeveloper 12c gallery by Martien van den Akker

clip_image001

A few weeks ago I did a BPM12c Quickstart Installation under Oracle Linux 6. Everything went smoothly, as described in the install guide as well as on many blogs already.
But I found that most of those blogs did an installation under Windows, where I did it under Oracle Linux in Virtualbox.
You would think (as I did) that it shouldn't matter. However, it turns out that in JDeveloper I was missing the 'BPM Application' amongst others in the JDeveloper New Gallery. Very inconvenient. I couldn't find any hints on the big internet. My friend Google wasn't very helpful in this.
But I wouldn't write this blog if I did not solve it. It turns out that with an update I got it solved.
It turns out that I lacked the 'Spring & Oracle Weblogic SCA' extension. Using the Help->Update functionality I downloaded and installed that and after restarting JDeveloper my 'New Gallery' was properly filled.
For those not so familiar with the JDeveloper update mechanism, here a step by step guide:

Choose Help->Update: Read the complete article here.

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Friday Feb 20, 2015

OSB12c: Errorhandling in REST by Martien van den Akker

clip_image002Yesterday, I had an OSB consulting day at a customer. We looked into a REST service that was to be extended with update functionality. Since calling an update service of an EIS (Enterprise Information System) can go wrong with all sorts of errors, it is important to be able to return a fault-message with the errors, jason format.
Now in OSB12c it's very apparent how you define possible fault-messages and even how the should be formatted in JSON:

In this sample case we created a more or less simple xsd for faults (dutch: fouten). To test with different fault messages we simply duplicated the 'fouten' element in the xsd to 'fouten2'. You can assign different HTTP-status codes to the different fault.
So this is configuration is pretty simple and straight forward. But it is not quite clear in the documents how you would return a specific fault within your error-handlers in the pipeline.
Internally OSB works not only 'XML'-based but actually SOAP-based. So the trick in the end is to replace the body with a soap-fault message and the selection of the REST/JSON errormessage is done based on the structure of the document in the details-section of the SOAP-Fault. In the screen above, you would define for each fault message an xsd-element and apparently it validates the soap-fault-details content against each XSD defined, and the xsd against which the detail-content is valid points to the returned fault, with the corresponding HTTP Status.

Read the complete article here

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Tuesday Mar 05, 2013

Generate Tradingpartners for Oracle B2B 11g with Ant by Martien van den Akker

At my previous customer, a Dutch energy infrastructure managing company, I worked on an implementation of AS2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AS2) message exchanging with Oracle B2B (part of SOASuite 11g) The company needed to exchange information about energy delivery with other companies that supply and transport energy (in this case natural gas).

Problem
Since there are many companies in the Netherlands that supply and transport gas, we needed to enter about 80 tradingpartners (TP's), that were very similar in message-exchange capabilities. Instead of entering those 80 TP’s in Oracle B2B by hand, which is a lot of error-prone work, I decided to see if it was possible to automate the process, by generating an export file that would serve as input property file for B2B. Hence, as a start I looked at the B2B selfservice scripts. With those (ANT) scripts you can generate an export file based on a set of definition input xml files. Afterwards this export file can be imported into B2B. This last step can be done manually, but you could even import (deploy) the generated export file and even deploy the agreements automatically.

Generating the export file from an addressing properties input Excel sheet
Oracle B2B IntegrationIn our case we had two roles: shippers and suppliers. There are a few differences between the two tradingpartner roles, but all the shippers have the same capabilities as well as all the suppliers.
Hence, shippers and suppliers send and receive about the same set of messages.
Also, all the TP’s are identified in the same way, using a code. Furthermore, all the addressing properties were delivered in an Excel sheet. So I could generate a property file naming all the TP’s with all their properties and their roles. Based on the TP’s role I determined if the TP should be enabled or not: only suppliers and shippers had to be imported, the rest of the TP's I disabled in the property file.
Lets take a look in how this was done.

Initializing
For the scripting I have some base targets and a base property file.

The property file: Read the full article here.

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For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit  www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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