Wednesday Apr 06, 2016

SOA Suite 12c: Collect & Deploy SCA composites & Service Bus artifacts using Maven by Maarten Smeets

clip_image002An artifact repository has many benefits for collaboration and governance of artifacts. In this blog post I will illustrate how you can fetch SCA composites and Service Bus artifacts from an artifact repository and deploy them. The purpose of this exercise is to show that you do not need loads of custom scripts to do these simple tasks. Why re-invent a wheel when Oracle already provides it?

This example has been created for SOA Suite 12.1.3. This will not work as-is for 11g and earlier since they lack OOTB Maven support for SOA Suite artifacts. In order to start using Maven to do command-line deployments, you need to have some Oracle artifacts in your repository. See http://biemond.blogspot.nl/2014/06/maven-support-for-1213-service-bus-soa.html on how to put them there. I have used two test projects which were already in the repository. A SCA composite called HelloWorld_1.0 and a Service Bus project also called HelloWorld_1.0. In my example, the SCA composite is in the GroupId nl.amis.smeetsm.composite and the Service Bus project is in the GroupId nl.amis.smeetsm.servicebus. You can find information on how to deploy to an artifact repository (e.g. Nexus) here.

SCA Composite

Quick & dirty with few dependencies

I have described getting your SCA composite out of Nexus and into an environment here. The process described there has very few dependencies. First you manually download your jar file using the repository API and then you deploy it using a Maven command like:

mvn com.oracle.soa.plugin:oracle-soa-plugin:deploy -DsarLocation=HelloWorld-1.0.jar -Duser=weblogic -Dpassword=Welcome01 -DserverURL=http://localhost:7101

In order for this to work, you need to have a (dummy) pom.xml file in the current directory. You cannot use the project pom file for this. The only requisites (next to a working Maven installation) are;

  • the sar file
  • serverUrl and credentials of the server you need to deploy to

Notice that you do not even need an Oracle home location for this. In order to build the project from sources however, you do need an Oracle home. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

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Tuesday Apr 05, 2016

SOA Expert Series Webcast April 6th 2016

http://www.middleworks.com/wp-content/uploads/MW_4c_leftaligned_35px.jpgWe’ve been talking about this for a couple years now, but finally did it. The idea is to take the very popular Open World panel session called “Oracle SOA Suite Tips and Tricks from Oracle Engineering and A-team” and bring this content to a much wider audience via webinar. We tested the waters with the first webinar in Jan, 2016 and it was even more successful than we had hoped.

We are now extending this into a larger series, to promote sharing of knowledge and expertise with the SOA Suite community at large. We have the commitment of the A-team and lots of good content from engineering, partners as well as customers. So, please check out the information below and register for the series.

And, please email any suggestions you have for future topics or proposals you have to present content of your own.



Upcoming Events

Weds Apr 6, 9AM PDT – Upgrading to SOA Suite 12c:
Tips and Best Practices from Engineering, Customers and A-team

Register Now!

(For those of you who have already upgraded to 12c, or are planning to in the next 12 months, please fill out our survey.)

In this webinar, we have put together a panel to share tips, tricks and best practices for upgrading to SOA Suite 12c. By now, many customers have made this transition, but there are still a very large base of 11g installations. This session will share real world experiences and lessons learned from those who have been down this path to those who will follow. As usual, we will have an active panel with brief, focused presentations and pointers to much more content which can be digested following the session. On the panel will be the SOA product management/engineering team responsible for the upgrade, and customers or partners describing the easiest and hardest parts of their upgrades, as well as some of the new opportunities/components available once your upgrade is complete. Come prepared with your questions and comments!

Planned for the panel or available for chat questions:

  • Antony Reynolds and Jay Kasi from the Oracle Service and Cloud Integration prod mgmt team, responsible for 12c upgrades, providing an overview and best practices for upgrade and describing a customer case study
  • Danilo Schmiedel of Opitz, an Oracle ACE Director talking about lessons learned and best practices from a 12c upgrade experience
  • Deepak Arora of the Oracle A-Team with some upgrade recommendations
  • David Shaffer of Middleworks, moderating and providing a list of additional resources
  • Kathryn Lustenberger from the Oracle Service and Cloud Integration prod mgmt team responsible for this series
  • Vamsee Goruganthu from the Oracle QA team, responsible for SOA 12c upgrade QA

Check back regularly as we plan out future events or email dave@middleworks.com to be put on the mailing list for an invitation.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Composite Sensors in Oracle SOA Suite 12c by Jennie DeRosa

clip_image002Overview

Implementing composite sensors within a SOA solution provides the ability to define trackable fields on messages and enables you to find a specific composite instance by searching for a field or fields within a message. For example, a sensor could be defined for an invoice number within a message, thus allowing us to search and find the instance where the invoice number in question is found.

While this functionality is not new within Oracle SOA Suite 12c, there are some improved capabilities that have been included in this release, which will be covered in this article.

Composite Sensors Review

Composite sensors can be defined within a SOA composite application in several components:

  • Service component (exposed service)
  • Reference component (external reference)
  • Mediator or BPEL component that have subscribed to a business event (publishing an event cannot have a sensor)

Within these components, a composite sensor can be defined in a couple of different ways. One way is to specify an existing variable as the sensor (as shown below). Another way is to define by an expression with the help of the expression builder. The third way is to define using properties (e.g. message header properties). Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Monday Apr 04, 2016

StreamExplorer and Oracle Event Processor – installation instructions to quickly get going by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002This article discusses the installation of Oracle Event Processor 12c on Linux 64bit and the subsequent installation of Stream Explorer on top of OEP 12c. This article assumes Linux 64bit as the operating system. More specifically: it assumes the environment that can be produced following the instructions in my article Quickly produce a Linux 64 bit Ubuntu 14.04 Desktop environment using Vagrant and Puppet – as starting point for Oracle installations – Ubuntu 14.04 64bit plus Desktop and JDK 7U79. Note that other Linux 64bit environments are probably fine (even better maybe as Ubuntu is not officially certified with OEP). Note that in a subsequent article I am going to leverage Vagrant and Puppet to automatically install OEP and Stream Explorer – so as to stamp out VM images for researching OEP and SX without manual actions.

I assume that the Linux environment has a user oracle in a group oracle and a directory (tree) /u01/app/oracle of which user oracle is the owner. This directory is where the ORACLE_HOME will be based.

The following steps are required:

1. Download Software Packages for OEP and SX and JDeveloper

2. Install Oracle Event Processor

3. Install Stream Explorer (as OPatch on top of OEP)

4. Create an OEP Domain

5. Start the OEP Domain and access Stream Explorer in browser

optional: 6. Install JDeveloper and create a connection to OEP domain

1. Download Software Packages for OEP and SX and JDeveloper

Go to http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/complex-event-processing/downloads/index.html, accept the OTN license agreement, and download three files:

  • OEP – ofm_sx_generic_12.1.3.0.0_disk1_1of2.zip
  • Stream Explorer – ofm_sx_generic_12.1.3.0.1_disk1_2of2.zip
  • (optional) JDeveloper – fmw_12.1.3.0.0_soaqs_Disk1_1of1.zip

Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Sunday Apr 03, 2016

SOA Suite on Docker by Jorge Quilcate

clip_image002

Visit Docker here

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Saturday Apr 02, 2016

API Management Implementation 12c Book Overview by Luis Augusto Weir

clip_image002Digital transformation is at the core of every business strategy regardless of what type of business an organisation is in. Companies that embark on a on a digital transformation journey are able to create innovative and disruptive solutions that are capable of delivering a much richer, unified and personalised user experience, at a lower cost. They are able to engage the customer in a seamless fashion through many channels such as mobile apps, responsive websites and social media. Organisations that adopt innovative digital business models gain considerable competitive advantage over those that don’t.
The fundamental driver for digital transformation is the ability to unlock key information assets and business functionality, which is often hidden inside an organisation’s enterprise systems and in SOA based web services which are only internally accessible. To materialise these assets, organisations need to build web based Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that not only provide standard, lightweight web access to these assets but also do so in a secured and controlled fashion. The lightweight nature and ease of use of these web APIs, ensure that they soon become the main mechanism for accessing information and functionality that is needed to build mobile applications, responsive websites and other cloud based solutions.
API management is the discipline that governs the software development lifecycle of APIs. It defines the tools and processes needed to build, publish and operate APIs including the management of the community of developers around it. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Service Bus enabling API Management by Tshepo Madigage

clip_image002Two of the most important questions businesses are asking themselves when launching new application infrastructure projects are:

  1. What steps do we need to take to elevate our initial “services infrastructure” into a “shared services infrastructure” supporting spikes in loads, improving high service availability, introducing agility, and simplifying manageability?
  2. As our infrastructure begins to expand beyond our firewalls to incorporate more third-party cloud services into mission critical projects, are we prepared to manage the increase in service response latency time and risk?

Oracle Service Bus – an integral part of Oracle SOA Suite – is proven, lightweight integration Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), Oracle Service Bus simplifies integration and improves time-to-market for new business services by replacing complex point-to-point integration with a single service virtualisation connection. Instead of disparate integration tool kits throughout your enterprise, Oracle Service Bus delivers a common standards-based integration solution spanning public cloud, private cloud, and on-premises applications and services. Oracle Service Bus allows you to achieve value more quickly with simple, code-free, configuration-based integration and supports rapid mobile enablement of smartphones and tablets.

As mobile and the Internet of Things continue to digitize all kinds of products and services, APIs are an essential component in securely connecting applications with devices. The newly released Oracle API Manager provides easy-to-use facilities for annotating and publishing REST and SOAP services as APIs to a developer portal where application developers can discover, test, register and subscribe to these APIs, as well as track API performance. It is available on-premises today and will soon be available as a component of Oracle’s rapidly expanding cloud services portfolio. Additionally, Oracle API Catalog simplifies the publication of API services that are developed in Oracle and other sources. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Thursday Mar 31, 2016

Top tweets SOA Partner Community – March 2016

image

Send your tweets @soacommunity #soaCommunity and follow us at http://twitter.com/soacommunity. Make sure you share your content with the community!

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Podcast Show Notes: Oracle API Management Implementation by Bob Rhubart-Oracle

clip_image001This 4-part OTN ArchBeat Podcast brings together the authors of the upcoming Packt Publishing book Oracle API Management 12c Implementation for a discussion of what has changed in Enterprise IT to make APIs so important, and what architects and developers need to know to take advantage.

  • Listen to Part 1: APIs have been around forever. So why has API Management become so important?
  • Listen to Part 2: API management and service management are two different things. it's important to understand the differences.
  • Listen to Part 3: What API developers need to know in order to take advantage of the growing market for APIs.
  • Listen to Part 4: The authors of Oracle API Management 12c Implementation talk about what they know now that they didn't know when they started work on the book.
Additional Resources

Suggest a topic or panelists for an OTN ArchBeat Podcast.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Tuesday Mar 29, 2016

Microservices and the Integration Platform by Robert Wunderlich

clip_image002In case you have not already heard of microservices, yet another evolution is upon us in the world of software development. A microservice is the antonym of the monolith and is a relatively new name for some concepts that have been around for some time. Microservices push us further toward the dream of decoupling with a promise of simpler, easier and cheaper services that are more reusable. As we get started, you can find a great primer on microservices through Martin Fowler’s blog at http://martinfowler.com/articles/microservices.html

Before I continue, I should point out that I am the Product Manager for Oracle Service Bus and that may cause you to wonder why I would be talking about microservices. As a matter of fact, Martin Fowler in his blog states “The microservice community favours an alternatitive approach: Smart endpoints and dumb pipes”. Others position microservices as an alternative to SOA even going as far as saying that microservices can be SOA done the right way.

You might think that as a product manager for an enterprise service bus product, I might be inclined to defend my product against this movement, but I don’t think that is necessary. I think this is not an either-or question, but rather a hybrid approach to integration and service delivery is a more realistic direction to take. Quite simply we will need to leverage microservices, and SOA and we can learn and apply principles from both.

In this post, I’ll very briefly discuss the evolution from the monolith to services. I’ll compare and contrast SOA and microservices, mainly because of how monolithic elements have grown in SOA over the years. I’ll point out some of the pain-points of both SOA and microservices and will conclude with how choosing a hybrid approach can realize the benefit of both SOA and microservices while helping to reduce the pain-points.

Our long journey in software development began with the mega-monolith, the mainframe. From the very beginning, business rapidly came up with new requirements for software and the need to bring new features to production faster continues to grow every day. In the early days, when mainframes ruled, the change cycles were extremely long.

An example of this comes from very large insurance company that I worked for. Just to make a small change in their claims processing system would take from months, up to a year or longer, and would be exceptionally expensive to complete. That change never happened because even though it would have helped the “human workflow”, it was just too expensive to implement. In those days of the mega-monolith, human users simply had to adapt to the machine even if it was not the most efficient approach, rather than to incur the cost of changing the system.

Our approach has evolved quite a bit since the early days of the mainframe. We determined that rather than change a large monolith, we could make incremental changes and integrate systems together in order to support business processes more rapidly. From the early integration patterns, we progressed to Service Oriented Architecture (SOA).

Over the years however, we have witnessed SOA implementations that have taken on a more monolithic approach so some observers have associated SOA itself as being monolithic.

I do believe that there is a place for monoliths and it is important for the practitioner to strike a balance of when to use a monolithic approach, and when to use a microservice approach. While we may be more familiar with SOA, let’s discuss some of the characteristics of MSA.

Microservice Architecture (MSA) is mostly an organizational approach to developing and delivering discrete functionality that is highly de-coupled. If anything is tightly coupled, it is the functions of development and operations which we will talk more about shortly. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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