Thursday Aug 27, 2009

Parallel Computing: Berkeley's Summer Bootcamp

Two weeks ago the Parallel Computing Laboratory at the University of California Berkeley ran an excellent three-day summer bootcamp on parallel computing. I was one of about 200 people who attended remotely while another large pile of people elected to attend in person on the UCB campus. This was an excellent opportunity to listen to some very well known and talented people in the HPC community. Video and presentation material is available on the web and I would recommend it to anyone interested in parallel computing or HPC. See below for details.

The bootcamp, which was called the 2009 Par Lab Boot Camp - Short Course on Parallel Programming covered a wide array of useful topics, including introductions to many of the current and emerging HPC parallel computing models (pthreads, OpenMP, MPI, UPC, CUDA, OpenCL, etc.), hands-on labs for in-person attendees, and some nice discussions on parallelism and how to find it with an emphasis on the motifs (patterns) of parallelism identified in The Landscape of Parallel Computing Research: A View From Berkeley. There was also a presentation on performance analysis tools and several application-level talks. It was an excellent event.

The bootcamp agenda is shown below. Session videos and PDF decks are available here.

talk title speaker
Introduction and Welcome Dave Patterson (UCB)
Introduction to Parallel Architectures John Kubiatowicz (UCB)
Shared Memory Programming with Pthreads, OpenMP and TBB Katherine Yelick (UCB & LBNL), Tim Mattson (Intel), Michael Wrinn (Intel)
Sources of parallelism and locality in simulation James Demmel (UCB)
Architecting Parallel Software Using Design Patterns Kurt Keutzer (UCB)
Data-Parallel Programming on Manycore Graphics Processors Bryan Catanzaro (UCB)
OpenCL Tim Mattson (Intel)
Computational Patterns of Parallel Programming James Demmel (UCB)
Building Parallel Applications Ras Bodik (UCB), Ras Bodik (UCB), Nelson Morgan (UCB)
Distributed Memory Programming in MPI and UPC Katherine Yelick (UCB & LBNL)
Performance Analysis Tools Karl Fuerlinger (UCB)
Cloud Computing Matei Zaharia (UCB)

Thursday Jun 18, 2009

FORTRAN: Calling All Dinosaurs!

DO you PROGRAM FORTRAN? IF so, READ on.

Please ASSIGN some time to RECORD your opinions about current and future FORTRAN needs in our non-COMPLEX online survey. It is in your INTRINSIC self-interest to PAUSE and DO so.

It is IMPLICIT and LOGICAL that you also CALL on your colleagues (those CHARACTERs) to READ this, get REAL, and make an ENTRY as well.

You can OPEN the survey IF you GOTO here.

(Something we share in COMMON: I am a FORTRAN TYPE as well and am eligible to join the Dinosaur UNION.)

Wednesday Mar 18, 2009

More Free HPC Developer Tools for Solaris and Linux

The Sun Studio team just released the latest version of our HPC developer tools with so many enhancements and additions it's hard to know where to start this blog entry. I suppose with the basics: As usual, all of the software is free. And available for both Solaris and Linux, specifically Solaris, OpenSolaris, RHEL, SuSE, and Ubuntu. Frankly, Sun would like to be your preferred provider for high-performance Fortran, C, and C++ compilers and tools. Given the performance and capabilities we deliver for HPC with Sun Studio, that seems a pretty reasonable goal to me. We think the price has been set correctly to achieve that as well. :-)

I have to admit to being confused by the naming convention for this release, but it goes something like this. The release is an EA (Early Access) version of Sun Studio 12 Update 1 -- the first major update to Sun Studio 12 since it was released in the summer of 2007. Since Sun Studio's latest and greatest bits are released every three months as part of the Express program, this release can also be called Sun Studio Express 3/09. Different names, same bits. Don't worry about it -- just focus on the fact that they make great compilers and tools. :-)

Regardless of what they call it, the release can be downloaded here. Take it for a spin and let the developers know what you think on the forum or file a request for enhancement (RFE) or a bug report here.

For the full list of new features, go here. For my personal list of favorite new features, read on.

  • Full OpenMP 3.0 compiler and tools support. For those not familiar, OpenMP is the industry standard for directives-based threaded application parallelization. Or, the answer to the question, "So how do I use all the cores and threads in my spiffy new multicore processor?"
  • ScaLAPACK 1.8 is now included in the Sun Performance Library! It works with Sun's MPI (Sun HPC ClusterTools), which is based on Open MPI 1.3. The Perflib team has also made significant performance enhancements to BLAS, LAPACK, and the FFT routines, including support for the latest Intel and AMD processors. Nice.
  • MPI performance analysis integrated into the Sun Performance Analyzer. Analyzer has been for years a kick-butt performance tool for single-process applications. It has now been extended to help MPI programmers deal with message-passing related performance problems.
  • Continued, aggressive attention paid to optimizing for the latest SPARC, Intel, and AMD processors. C, C++, and Fortran performance will all benefit from these changes.
  • A new standalone GUI debugger. Go ahead, graduate from printf() and try a real debugger. It won't bite.

As I mentioned above, full details on these new features and many, many more are all documented on this wiki page. And, again, the bits are here.

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Josh Simons

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